HIGH HURSTWOOD

ITS HISTORY from the STONE AGE to the 21st CENTURY

 

ITS BUILDINGS AND LANDS, THE FAMILIES THAT OCCUPIED THEM,

AND THE ACTIVITIES THAT WENT ON THERE

 

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MAYPOLE FARM
& original MAYPOLE INN,
formerly MIRES

 

 

HISTORY

 

Google Earth placemark for the location of the Maypole Farm

 

 

The Maypole Farm was previously called Mires, particularly by the Alchorne family during their ownership in the second half of the 18th century and early part of the 19th century. It is thought that it was in about 1830 that a beer shop was opened in part of farmhouse and called the Maypole Inn, with the result that over the next decade or so the whole property became known as the Maypole. When the new Maypole Inn just across the road was built in 1878 the Maypole Farm became known as the Old Maypole and is today known as The Old Maypole Farm.

The farmhouse was built in the late 15th century on about 4 acres of new assert copyhold land taken from the Common called Hayerst Wood in Buxted Parish. This land was then part of the bailiwick of Framfield within the Manor of South Malling that was owned by the Archbishops of Canterbury. Then Henry VIII confiscated the Manor of South Malling and took it into royal ownership and over the remainder of the 16th century its three bailiwicks evolved into full manors and by the end of the century had passed into private ownership. The owner of Maypole Farm had now become a copyhold tenant of the Manor of Framfield, and that is how it would remain until it was enfranchised (made freehold) with the extinguishment of manors by Act of Parliament and the payment of compensation to the Lord of the Manor of Framfield in 1930 by the then owner.

The house was probably the highest status building in the area when it was built, being of slightly above average size at 47ft 6ins by 21ft 8ins with a closely studded front elevation. It is a four-bay medieval hall house with its main axis approximately north south and its front facing east. The two central bays formed a large central hall open to the roof with a fire in the centre of the floor. The south bay was the parlour with an end jetty and an upper floor open to the roof and accessed by stairs from the parlour. The north bay was the service end with an upper floor open to the roof and accessed by stairs from the hall. A garderobe turret (toilet) projected from the north-west corner of the service bay upper floor. The windows were unglazed and probably covered in translucent animal skins.

The surviving timber barn was built at the same time as the house, the main beams being of the same style as those in the house. Sometime after the initial building a half acre plot with a barn and millhouse was added to the farm, and then a plot of nearly an acre with a cottage on the opposite side of the road to the house was added. The ½ acre with barn and millhouse is thought to be where the new Maypole Inn was built as the field next to it where Maypole Cottages were built was called the Miller’s Field alias Millfield, but as there is no source of water there it couldn’t have been a watermill and it doesn’t seem to be a suitable position for a windmill so possible it was an animal powered mill. The one acre with cottage is thought to be part of what is now the village recreation ground from which the cottage has long gone. The original house is much too grand for someone who only farmed this small holding, so they either owned a significant amount of land elsewhere or they were involved in some other money making concern such as the local iron industry.

Major modifications were made to the house during the Elizabethan period, probably during the third quarter of the 16th century. An upper floor was inserted in the open hall and a single flue chimney built for a fire to heat the ground floor of the hall bay. The tall windows that lit the old open hall were replaced by bay windows in the front wall and the wide medieval door to the hall replaced by a narrower one. It was probably also during this period that the timber framing at the bottom of the front wall was replaced by stone.  Also during this period, or possibly during the 17th century, the timber framing of the lower half of the rear wall was replaced by stone. All these replacements were presumably due to rot in the timbers.

The next major modification to the house was during the 17th century when the single flue chimney was replaced by a four flue chimney in a slightly different place. This provided for an inglenook fireplace in the hall with a moulded and arched timber lintel of 16th century date that probably reused from the original fireplace. There was now a fireplace in the old service bay that now became the parlour and fireplaces in the upper rooms above the hall and the new parlour. A two room cellar was now added below the old service bay accessed by internal stairs, and ceilings added to the upper floor rooms. Also most of the windows would now have been glazed.

The earliest mention so far found of the owners of Mires has the fields called Cotties being owned by a member of the Sheather otherwise Stace family and the rest of Mires owned by Matthew Parker. Then probably in the early 17th century Robert Olive purchased both these parts of Mires bringing them under one ownership. The Olive family were major local property owners; whose main residence was at New House Farm (now Olive House). The Olive family probably never lived at Mires but leased or rented it out. Robert Olive’s ownership of Mires ended when at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 21 September 1664 Mires passed to his nephew William Olive.[1]

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 9 November 1687 William Olive conditionally surrendered (mortgaged) Mires to widow Joan Alchorne, this surrender to be void if William Olive paid Joan Alchorne £52 10s on 15 October 1688 at the Lewes mansion house of Walter Brett, gentleman. Mires was then described as a messuage with garden, orchard and croft of new assert land thereto belonging of 3 acres and 3 roods. (Plots 1, 2, 5 & 6 on the 1840 Buxted Tithe Map.) Also a little parcel of land with a barn and buildings called a millhouse thereon of half an acre, formerly part of the Waste. (Plot 4 on the 1840 Buxted Tithe Map.) Also one cottage and parcel of new assert land of 3½ roods on the other side of the highway opposite the aforesaid messuage. (Plot 3 on the 1840 Buxted Tithe Map.) All which premises are at High Hurstwood, late the lands of Robert Olive deceased, uncle of the aforenamed William Olive, and formerly Matthew Parker’s. Also four pieces of new assert land called Cotties containing 6 acres at High Hurstwood, late the lands of aforenamed Robert Olive and formerly Sheather’s otherwise Stace’s. (Plots 7, 8 & 10 on the 1840 Buxted Tithe Map.)[2]

William Olive, who had owned Mires for 23 years, died and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 22 March 1688. He had made his will on 9 March 1688 and probate of this will was granted to his son William Olive and his son-in-law Richard Alchorne, the two executors and trustees, by the Deanery of South Malling on 30 May 1688. In this will he left his land called Bridgfield to his son William and all the rest of his property both freehold and copyhold, which included Mires, he left in trust to his trustees, who were his son William Olive and his son-in-law Richard Alchorne, to be sold and the proceeds equally divided between his children, Mary Olive, Sara Olive, Elizabeth Olive, Charity Olive, Dorothy Olive and John Olive.[3]

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 9 May 1688 the death was presented of William Olive, who held the copyhold property of Mires. A Heriot valued at £4 10s was seized for the Lord of the Manor, and on production of the will of William Olive his son William Olive and son-in-law Richard Alchorne were admitted as tenants in trust of this property on payment of a relief and fine of 22s 3d to the Lord of the Manor.[4]

It seems that it was then realized that there was an outstanding mortgage from Joan Alchorne on this property that should have been repaid on 15 October 1688. So at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 18 December 1689, on the fifth proclamation of any claim on Mires, it was forfeited to Joan Alchorne, who was admitted as tenant. At the same court Joan Alchorne together with Richard Alchorne of Buxted, who was one of the trustees of Mires, sell Mires to William Olive, who was the other trustee of Mires and the eldest son of the deceased William Olive.[5] According to the normal custom of the manor this sale would have been for the amount of money owed on the mortgage.

This William Olive owned Mires for forty-one years, he died and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 19 November 1730. He had made his will on 6 August 1727 and probate was granted to his wife Mary Olive, the sole executor, by the Deanery of South Malling on 26 June 1731. In this will William left all his real and personal estate, except for 5s to Mary the wife of Richard Farmer of Barcombe, to his wife to use in the bringing up of their children. He made the Reverend Mr William Clarke of Buxted and Mr John Olive of Buxted trustees, who together with his wife he gave the power to sell his property as they thought convenient.[6]

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 13 October 1731 the death was presented of William Olive, who held Mires. For a Heriot a small cow valued at 25s was seized for the Lord of the Manor, and on presentation of William Olive’s will his widow Mary Olive was admitted as tenant of this property on payment of a relief and fine of 22s 3d to the Lord of the Manor. At the same court Mary Olive then surrenders this copyhold property to the uses of her will.[7]

Mary Olive only retained ownership of Mires for eighteen months, at an adjourned Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 10 May 1732, Mary Olive sold Mires to Richard Olive, the younger brother of her late husband William Olive. For a Heriot a small cow valued at £1 1s was seized for the Lord of the Manor, and Robert Olive was admitted as tenant of this property on payment of a relief and fine of 22s 3d to the Lord of the Manor. At the same court Robert Olive then surrenders this copyhold property to the uses of his will.[8]

Robert Olive owned Mires for eleven years, he died and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 10 March 1743. He had made his will on 12 March 1736, when he described himself as a yeoman of Buxted Parish, and probate of this will was granted to William and Robert Olive, the two executors, by the Deanery of South Malling on 7 May 1743. In this will Robert left all his copyhold properties, which included Mires, to Robert Olive the son of his late brother William Olive of High Hurstwood and made his executors the guardians of Robert and his brother William.[9]

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 12 October 1743 the death was presented of Robert Olive, who held Mires. No Heriot was due as Robert Olive had no living beast. Came to the court Robert Olive, a mercer of Mayfield, nephew of Robert Olive deceased and eldest son and heir of William Olive the late owner of Mires, and claimed Mires as his right and inheritance, and he was admitted as tenant of this property on payment of a relief in the name of a fine of 3s 9d to the Lord of the manor.[10]

Nine years later, at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 21 May 1752, Robert Olive, a mercer of Mayfield, sold Mires to John Alchorne, a yeoman of Lane End Farm, and his wife Sarah. No Heriot was due as Robert Olive had no living beast, and John and Sarah Alchorne were admitted as tenants for their lifetimes on payment of a relief and fine of £1 5s to the Lord of the Manor.[11]

It seems likely that it was at the time of John Alchorne’s purchase of the farm that the 18th century modifications were made to the house. This involved adding an extension with a cat-slide roof to the southern end of the house. The lower half of the original south wall was removed enabling the extension to add about 5 feet to the width of the ground floor of what was now the service bay. A single-flue chimney was added against the southern wall of the extension for a cooper to heat water, and a rear door was inserted in this bay to give direct access to the well just outside. All the windows in the front of the house were replaced with 18th century casements.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 21 June 1777 John Alchorne was granted 1 rood of land from the Waste of the Manor called Hayerst Wood that adjoined his own land on the north and the highroad on the east, west and south. This is thought to be the south-west corner of plot 3 on the 1840 Tithe Map that has now become the village recreation ground. John was admitted as a tenant of this new assert copyhold land on which the yearly rent to the Lord of the Manor was to be 1d, on payment of a fine of £2 to the Lord of the Manor. At the same court John then surrendered all his copyhold properties to the uses of his will.[12]

John Alchorne owned Mires for 26 years, he died at the age of 73 and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 19 November 1778. John had made his will on 25 September 1777 when he described himself as living at Mires and still owning Lane End Farm, and in this will he left his farm called Mires to the use of his second wife Hannah during her lifetime and then after her death, as he had no surviving children, it was to be inherited by Thomas Alchorne the son of his deceased cousin Richard Alchorne, and if Thomas didn’t have any male children, which he didn’t, on his death it was then to be inherited by Thomas Alchorne the son of William Alchorne, who was the brother of Thomas.[13]

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 1 July 1779 the death was presented of John Alchorne, who held Mires. For a Heriot a steer valued at £5 5s was seized for the Lord of the Manor, and the first proclamation was made for the heir to this property to come to court to be admitted, but nobody came to court. (Note that the property description in this court record erroneously contains a bit of John’s Lane End Farm property but not the main part of the farm, and also a bit of his cousin John Alchorne’s Broom Farm.)[14]

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 22 June 1781 on the third proclamation of any claim on the copyhold property of Mires, Hannah Alchorne, widow of John Alchorne came to court and claimed it as her Widows Bench according to the custom of the manor, and she was admitted as tenant of these premises for her lifetime on payment of a relief of 4s 3d to the Lord of the Manor.[15]

The land tax record for 1785 shows Hannah Alchorne as the owner of Mires with Thomas Izzard as the occupier and the rentable value to be £7. Thomas Izzard also occupied the adjacent three fields known as Cocks Land that were owned by Mr Asten and had a rentable value of £4. Then in the land tax record for 1798 Hannah Alchorne continued to own Mires and it was still occupied by Thomas Izzard, though he no longer occupied the adjacent Cocks Land. So Hannah Alchorne didn’t live at Mires and the Alchorne family had probably stopped being the occupiers, but not the owners, of Mires when John Alchorne died in 1778. Hannah Alchorne owned Mires for 24 years, until she died at the age of 81, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 28 June 1802.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 28 June 1802 the death was presented of Hannah Alchorne, who held Mires for her lifetime. No Heriot was due as Hannah Alchorne had no living beast, and the first proclamation was made for somebody to come to court to claim this property.[16]

The following year, at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 1 July 1803, on the second proclamation of any claim on Mires, Thomas Alchorne, son of Richard Alchorne, came to court and produced a copy of the will of John Alchorne in which he was to inherit Mires on the death of Hannah Alchorne, so he was admitted as a tenant of this property on payment of a relief and fine of £1 2s 6d to the Lord of the Manor.[17]

Thomas Alchorne lived at Uckfield, not at Mires, which he owned for 18 years, until his death at the age of 85, and burial in the Churchyard of Holy Cross at Uckfield on 28 September 1820. He died without having had any children, so according to the will of John Alchorne Mires was to pass to his brother William Alchorne’s son Thomas Alchorne, but as this Thomas Alchorne had already died it was to pass to his son Thomas Alchorne grandson of William Alchorne.

The following year, at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 23 June 1821 the death was presented of Thomas Alchorne, who held Mires that paid a yearly rent of 3s 9½d to the Lord of the Manor. No Heriot was due as Thomas Alchorne had no living beast, and on the first proclamation of any claim on this property Thomas Alchorne, grandson of William Alchorne, came to court and on production of the will of John Alchorne was admitted as tenant of this property on payment of reliefs and fines of £1 2s 9d to the Lord of the Manor.[18]

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 21 June 1828 Thomas Alchorne was granted 1 rood 26 perches of land from the Waste of the Manor called Hayerst Wood Common that abutted his own land on the south-east and south-west, the Waste of the Manor on the north and running to a point on the east and west, to hold as new assert copyhold land at a yearly rent of 2d payable to the Lord of the Manor, and Thomas Alchorne was admitted as tenant of this land without paying any fine to the Lord of the Manor as a favour.[19] This is plot 9 on the 1840 Tithe Map and the land upon which Thomas Alchorne built a double dwelling cottage called Stone Cottages (demolished in the late 1960s and replaced by new houses) that he presumably rented out independently of Maypole Farm.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 21 June 1830 it was recorded that out of court on 16 February 1830 Thomas Alchorne and his wife Jane conditionally surrendered (mortgaged) Mires to Mary Blackman, a spinster of Southover near Lewes, for £250 at 5% interest.[20]

A map of Old Hall Cottage dated 3 September 1831 is the first recorded use, so far found, of the name Maypole, when it referred to the road going past Old Hall Cottage, as leading from Crowborough to the Maypole and Buxted Church.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 20 June 1832 Thomas Alchorne was granted 21 perches of land from the Waste of the Manor called Hayerst Wood Common that abutted his own land on the west and the road from the Maypole to Nordens Green Farm on all other sides, to hold as new assert copyhold land at a yearly rent of 1d payable to the Lord of the Manor, and Thomas Alchorne was admitted as tenant of this land on payment of a fine of £1 to the Lord of the Manor.[21] This is plot 11 on the 1840 Tithe Map and the land upon which Thomas Alchorne built a cottage called Nordens Green Cottage (now Pheasants Cottage) that he presumable rented out independently of Maypole Farm.

The above two documents from 1831 and 1832 are the earliest records so far found of Mires being called the Maypole. It is assumed that the name Maypole started off as the sign of the beer house opened in farmhouse and in time became the name of the entire property. As the name Mires was used on the 1840 Tithe Map and the name Maypole Farm in the 1841 census it seems that this was still in the transition period of the name change and the beer house had probably not been open for more than about a decade at the most. It seems that the Maypole Inn was almost certainly the name of this beer house; it is the name used in all censuses and other documents, except for directories that for some reason always referred to it as the Hurstwood Inn.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 22 June 1837 Thomas Alchorne was granted 33 perches of land from the Waste of the Manor called Hayerst Wood Common that abutted the road from Hayerst Wood to Buxted Rocks on the north, to the road from Hayerst Wood to Nordens Green on the east, to land of William Ewen on the south, and to a water course and marl pit of the Waste on the west. to hold as new assert copyhold land at a yearly rent of 1d payable to the Lord of the Manor, and Thomas Alchorne was admitted as tenant of this land on payment of a fine of £2 10s to the Lord of the Manor.[22]

The Buxted Tithe Map of 1840 and Tithe Apportionments of 26 May 1841 recorded that Maypole Farm (called Myers Farm), plots 1 to 12, was then owned by Thomas Alchorne and occupied by Richard Booker. It had a total area of 16 acres 3 roods 15 perches on which Tithe Charge was to be £3 10s. Maypole Farm, including Stone Cottages (plot 9) and Nordens Green Cottage (plot 11), consisted of the following:[23]

 

Plot No

Plot Name

Cultivation

Acres

Roods

Perches

1

Homestead

Homestead

1

0

5

2

The Great Mead

Pasture

2

2

30

3

Roundabouts

Pasture

1

3

2

4

Timber Yard

Yard

 

1

13

5

Wheelwright’s Shop Field

Arable

 

3

32

6

Hop Garden

Hops

1

2

23

7

Lower Field

Arable

1

2

28

8

Middle Field

Arable

4

1

35

9

Gardens & Cottage

Gardens

 

2

39

10

Old Hop Garden

Arable

1

1

18

11

Cottage & Garden

Garden

 

 

26

12

Garden

Garden

 

 

4

 

 

Google Earth overlay of Maypole Farm on the 1840 Tithe Map

 

In the census of 6 June 1841 Maypole Farm was occupied by the family of 55-year-old farmer Richard Booker, consisting of his wife Dorothy aged 50 and their children, William aged 24, John aged 21, Charity aged 19, Charles aged 10, and Ann aged 7, together with 24-year-old carpenter William Jarvis and 17-year-old farm labourer Ambrose Vinall. Also living at the Maypole was 24-year-old blacksmith William Mann and his wife Mary aged 24, who were probably renting a room or two off the main occupiers. William would have been working for the Colbran family at the nearby forge. If the Maypole Inn was in operation at this time the publican was likely to have been Richard Booker’s son William, who is known to have later been a publican at Morphews and the Royal Oak. The owner of Maypole Farm, Thomas Alchorne, was then living just up the road at Carrots Farm.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 17 June 1841 Thomas Alchorne was granted 3 roods 16 perches of new assert copyhold land from the Waste of the Manor called Hayerst Wood Common, that was bounded on the south by his own land, on the north by the land of Carrots Farm owned by Charles Goring, and on the east and west by Hayerst Wood Common. This was an addition to the north-east side of the field that was to become the village recreation ground. The yearly rent to the Lord of the Manor was to be 4d, and Thomas was admitted as tenant of this land on payment of a fine of £10 to the Lord of the Manor.[24]

Then four years later, at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 9 July 1845 Thomas Alchorne was granted 14 perches of new assert copyhold land from the Waste of the Manor called Hayerst Wood Common, that was bounded on the west by his own land, on the east by the road from Buxted Church to Crowborough Gate, and on the north by the land leading to the Tunbridge Wells Turnpike. This was an addition to the corner of the orchard at the junction of Perrymans Lane with the Hurstwood Road. The yearly rent to the Lord of the Manor was to be 1d, and Thomas was admitted as tenant of this land on payment of a fine of £1 to the Lord of the Manor.[25]

By the time of the census of 30 March 1851 Richard Booker and his family had moved to Newlands Farm (now the Royal Oak) and Maypole Farm was occupied by the family of 40-year-old farmer of 15 acres James Irving, consisting of his wife Jane aged 51, brother-in-law George Susans, a 39-year-old widower and farm labourer, with his daughter Emily Susans aged 6, and 15-year-old general servant Elizabeth Duplock. Also still living at the Maypole was 34-year-old journeyman blacksmith William Mann and his wife Mary aged 33, presumably still renting a room or two off the main occupiers. The publican of the Maypole Inn would have been James Irving, probably opening only in the evenings after he had finished farming, as did many beer shops. In the 1855 edition of the Post Office Directory of Sussex James Irving is at the Maypole Inn (listed as the Hurstwood Inn).

James Irving died at the age of 47 and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen on 8 March 1858. Then in the 1859 edition of the Post Office Directory of Sussex Mrs Jane Irving is at the Maypole Inn (listed as the Hurstwood Inn). The 27 September 1859 edition of The Sussex Advertiser carried the notice that the live and dead farming stock, household furniture, and effects of the late James Irving were to be auctioned by Mr T S Markwick at the Maypole Inn on 8 October 1859.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 20 June 1860 it was recorded that in a writing dated 15 October 1859 Francis Harding Gell, the surviving executor of the will of Mary Blackman, acknowledge receiving full repayment of the principal and interest of a mortgage that Mary Blackman had given Thomas and Jane Alchorne in 1830.[26]

By the time of the census of 7 April 1861 the family of William Mann had moved just up the road to Lime Kiln House (now Old Hall Cottage), and widow Jane Irving had moved to Ringles Cross in Uckfield. Maypole Farm was now occupied by 36-year-old proprietor of houses Henry Duvall and his wife Elizabeth aged 30. At the Maypole Inn was 67-year-old victualler and innkeeper James Hyde with his wife Mary aged 67 and 14-year-old general servant Sarah Bennett. It’s not known who was operating the farm at this time, Henry Duvall had been a farmer at Carrots Farm until he became bankrupt in 1857, and had probably left Maypole Farm before or around the time his wife died in 1864.

The 28 December 1861 edition of the Sussex Agricultural Express reported that at the Uckfield Petty Sessions held on 26 December 1861 the magistrates had transferred the licence for the Maypole Inn from James Hyde to Edward Mark Tellon (error for Edward Manktelow). Then the Buxted Church Rate Book entry for 9 September 1862 recorded that the tenant at the Maypole Inn was Edward Manklow (error for Edmund Manktelow). Edmund with his wife Charlotte and daughter Sally had been at Haywards Farm in Rotherfield in the 1861 census.

When the remaining Wastes of the Manor of Framfield were enclosed in 1862 Thomas Alchorne, as the owner of Maypole Farm, was granted plots 145, 149, 152, 153 & 159 totalling 2 acres 3 roods 29 perches as copyhold land, and he purchased plots 148 & 154 totalling 2 roods 32 perches for £14 as freehold land. Plots 148, 153 & 154 were additions to the field that later became the village recreation ground, and Thomas was to erect and maintain fences on the sides next to the road and the sides next to plots granted to Carrots Farm. Plot 149 was a narrow strip of land between Royal Oak Lane and his own property, and Thomas was to erect and maintain fences on the side next to the road. Plot 152 was the Wheelwright Shop, and Thomas was to erect and maintain fences on the side next to the road. Plot 145 was where Thomas erected a cottage called Laurel Cottage (now Quarry Cottage) that he rented to a wheelwright who worked at his Wheelwrights Shop. Plot 159 was next to the river on the opposite side of Perrymans Lane to the Maypole Farm land and next to plot 157 of 1 rood 32 perches granted to his son John Alchorne, and together they became part of Maypole Farm and known as The Common (now Bramble Bank).[27]

The 9 June 1866 edition of The Sussex Express reported on and inquest held at the Maypole Inn on Monday 4 June 1866, on the body of a female baby found buried in the garden of the cottage (thought to be one of the Stone Cottages in Royal Oak Lane) occupied by widow Caroline Bray. Buxted police constable Thomas Green reported that he had found the body the previous morning having searched there three times before due to his suspicions having been aroused. The body was buried a foot deep in the garden and the landlord Edmund Manktelow was present when it was dug up. The police surgeon reported that the child had probably been born alive and the body appeared to be that of a healthy and fully developed child, and no signs of a possible cause of death were found. Caroline Bray denied having given birth to the child and her neighbour Elizabeth Vinall stated that she had not notice that Bray had been in the family way. The inquest jury returned a verdict of ‘found dead’, and at Uckfield Petty Sessions held on Thursday 7 June 1866 Caroline Bray was charged with concealing the birth of a child and committed for trial at the next Assizes. Then the 18 July 1866 edition of The Sussex Express reported that at her trial on 17 July 1866 Caroline Bray was found guilty as charged and sentenced to 6 months’ hard labour.

Thomas Alchorne died at Uckfield on 26 June 1866, at the age of 78, and he was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 30 June 1866, Thomas had made his will on the 11 August 1846 and probate was granted to his son John Alchorne, the surviving executor, by the Principal Probate Registry on 27 August 1866. In this will Thomas left all his real estate to his son John, who was a farmer living with his wife Frances at Harlands Farm in Uckfield.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 26 June 1867 the death was presented of Thomas Alchorne, who held Maypole Farm, Stone Cottages, Nordens Green Cottage, Laurel Cottage and Camellia Cottage. No Heriot was due as Thomas Alchorne had no living beast, and on the first proclamation of any claim on these properties his son John Alchorne came to court and on production of his father’s will was admitted as tenant of these properties on payment of reliefs and fines of £1 7s 9d to the Lord of the Manor.[28]

In the 1866 & 1867 editions of the Post Office Directory of Sussex Edmund Manktelow is at the Maypole Inn (listed as Edwin Macktlow at the Hurstwood Inn). In the census of 2 April 1871 the Maypole Inn was occupied by 42-year-old farmer of 70 acres Edmund Manktelow, with his wife Charlotte aged 51, and as a boarder they had 11-year-old Sally Sales Manktelow, who was the illegitimate daughter of Edmund’s deceased sister Julia. In this census Edmund and Charlotte’s daughter Sally was living with Charlotte’s father, Samuel Packham, at nearby Parkhurst Farm. Samuel died on 8 November 1871 and the Manktelow family move to Parkhurst Farm. The 22 August 1872 Register of Licences for the Uckfield Petty Sessional Division recorded that the Alehouse Licence for the Maypole Inn was now held by Joseph Wilmshurst.

In the 1874 edition of the Post Office Directory of Sussex Joseph Wilmshurst is listed as a beer retailer and farmer at High Hurstwood. This must be at the Maypole Inn as William Booker, the other beer retailer listed at High Hurstwood, is known to have been at the only other beer shop, the Royal Oak.

It was sometime between 1867, when he inherited Maypole Farm, and 1878; probably near the end of this period that John Alchorne, as he records in his will, purchased the freehold field called Millfield or Maypole Mead, plot 264 on the 1840 Buxted Tithe Map, from Albert Henry Hills, the owner of Parkhurst Farm. It is assumed that this is what caused the recording in the Court Book of the Manor of Framfield on 15 April 1878 that John Alchorne and his wife Frances had paid the Lord of the Manor £12 3s 10d to enfranchise (make freehold) the 33 perches of land, now found to be 60 perches, that John’s father Thomas Alchorne had been granted from the Waste as copyhold in 1837.[29] Then at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 21 June 1878 it was recorded that this enfranchisement had been confirmed in an indenture dated 26 April 1878.[30] John had presumably enfranchised just this piece of land as it was adjacent to Maypole Mead that he had recently purchased and was freehold, because he didn’t enfranchise the rest of Maypole Farm, which was also copyhold.

The 19 February 1878 edition of The Sussex Advertiser reported that at the Uckfield Petty Sessions held on 14 February 1878 Joseph Wilmshurst, 40-year-old publican at the Maypole Inn, was charged with assaulting his wife Naomi and daughter Emily during the night of 30/31 January 1878. Naomi gave detailed evidence of the assaults that mostly took place in her bedroom and her children’s bedroom, after which she run to a neighbouring cottage occupied by Mrs Curd for the rest of the night and then went to stay with her sister at Brighton. She also stated that her husband had been twice previously bound over to keep the peace towards her. Joseph was found guilty and sentenced to four months’ imprisonment, to be followed by being bound over in the sum of £40 and two £20 sureties to keep the peace for six months.

Then two months later the 30 April 1878 edition of The Sussex Advertiser reported that at the Uckfield Petty Sessions held on 25 April 1878 the license of the Maypole Inn had been transferred from Joseph Wilmshurst to William Martin. In the 1878 edition of the Post Office Directory of Sussex William Marten is listed at the Maypole, High Hurstwood, he was then the publican of the Maypole Inn in part of the farmhouse and also farmed the land. In 1874 he had married Sally Manktelow, daughter of a previous publican at the Maypole Inn, and their third child, William Henry Martin, was born there on 1 December 1878.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 21 June 1878 it was recorded that out of court on 12 June 1878 John Alchorne was granted a licence, on payment of a relief of 4s 11½d to the Lord of the Manor, to lease his copyhold properties, which included Maypole Farm, for a period of 21 years commencing on 29 September 1878 at an annual rent not less than the fair value.[31]

Then by an indenture dated 15 August 1878 John Alchorne, a farmer of Uckfield, leased Maypole Farm to William Verrall, a brewer of Southover near Lewes, from the 29 September 1878 for 21 years at £50 per year and all taxes except the Land Tax, Landlord’s part of the Property Tax, and Quit Rents. Maypole Farm was then described as a messuage used as a public house known as The Maypole with the buildings, gardens and several pieces of land containing all together 23 acres and 2 roods at High Hurstwood. This lease did not include the old timber yard on which William Verrall was to build the new Maypole Inn or the Wheelwrights. John Alchorne retained for himself all wood and timber growing on the property and all minerals on or under it. William Verrall was to maintain the property and its buildings in good repair except the messuage used as a public house which John Alchorne would maintain and also divide it into two dwellings at William Verrall’s request. John Alchorne was to also demolish the Old Lodge and replace it with a Coach House wide enough for two vehicles.

The 6 August 1878 edition of The Sussex Advertiser carried a notice from William Verrall, brewer of Southover, that he intended to apply for an excise licence for a public house that he was going to build on land owned by John Alchorne at High Hurstwood just across the road from the present Maypole Inn. Then the 4 September 1878 edition of The Sussex Advertiser reported that at the Uckfield Licensing Session on 29 August 1878 William Verrall was granted a provisional licence for an alehouse to be erected in place of the present Maypole Inn. The 29 August 1878 Register of Licences for the Uckfield Petty Sessional Division recorded that the Alehouse Licence for the Maypole Inn was now held by William Marten and the owner (actually leaseholder) was William Verrall.

The 28 August 1879 Register of Licences for the Uckfield Petty Sessional Division recorded that the Alehouse Licence for the new Maypole Inn was now confirmed and on 23 October 1879 William Marten became the licence holder there. The old Maypole Inn in the farmhouse now closed and although William Marten and his family moved to the new Maypole Inn he remained as the farmer of the land of Maypole Farm, where he had a chicken fattening business, as the tenant of the leaseholder William Verrall, until his death in 1915. The farmhouse now being rented out to other families by William Verrall.

 

 

In the census of 3 April 1881 Maypole Farmhouse was occupied by 30-year-old wife of a beer shop keeper Susannah Relf, with her children, Richard aged 10, Elizabeth aged 7, Joseph aged 6, Mercy aged 5, Alice aged 2 and Grace aged 1.

It was probably sometime during the early 1880s that John Alchorne divided the Maypole Farmhouse into two dwellings, though it seems that for many years prior to this the house had frequently been occupied by two families, presumably with one family renting a room or two from the main occupying family. It was probably during this modification that the two ground floor extensions to the rear of the house were added, for the southern of these extensions the lower half of the original rear wall was removed to enable this extension to be incorporated into the house. These changes were presumably to give more room for occupancy by two families.

In the census of 5 April 1891 Maypole Farmhouse (called Maypole Cottage) was now two dwellings; the southern one was occupied by the family of 28-year-old assurance agent Henry Marley, consisting of his wife Alice aged 22, and their children, Henry aged 2 and Bertram aged 8 months. The northern dwelling was occupied by the family of 61-year-old gamekeeper John Charman, consisting of his wife Annie aged 49 and their children, Frederick aged 22, and Margaret aged 9.

William Verrall died at the Manor House, Southover on 12 January 1890 at the age of 91, and his Southover Brewery passed to his son Francis Verrall together with the lease on Maypole Farm. This leased was renewed by an indenture dated 29 April 1897 when John Alchorne, a gentleman of Uckfield, leased Maypole Farm to Francis Verrall, a gentleman of the Manor House, Southover, Lewes for 21 years from 29 September 1897 at £50 per year. All the conditions of this lease were the same as in the 1878 lease. On 11 January 1898 Frances Verrall sold the Southover Brewery together with its public houses, including the new Maypole Inn, to the brewers Page and Overton of Croydon.[32]

 

 

In the census of 31 March 1901 Maypole Farmhouse was two dwellings; the southern one was occupied by the family of 38-year-old Prudential insurance agent Henry Marley, consisting of his wife Alice aged 32, and their children, Henry aged 12, Bertram aged 10, Alice aged 8, and Olive aged 9 months. The northern dwelling was occupied by the family of 71-year-old cottage gardener John Charman, consisting of his wife Annie aged 59 and their children, Emma aged 35, Frederick aged 33, and Margaret aged 19.

John Alchorne, the owner of Maypole Farm, died on 14 November 1902, at the age of 81. He had made his will on 28 October 1902, when he described himself as a retired farmer of Vernon Place in Uckfield, and probate was granted to the three executors by the Principal Probate Registry on 29 January 1903. In this will John left Maypole Farm, which he stated was then leased to Francis Verrall, to his wife Frances Alchorne during her lifetime and then after her death, which happened on 8 April 1910 at the age of 85, it was to go to Frank John Allcorn of Balneath Farm, Chailey.

 

 

It was possibly when Carrots Farm was auctioned off in separate lots on 8 August 1907 that Lot 4, which consisted of a freehold field called Murgars, plot 359 on the 1840 Buxted Tithe Map of 1a 3r 7p, was purchased by the Alchorne family and incorporated into the Maypole Farm, though there is some indication that it might have been a few years later than this.

 

 

In the census of 2 April 1911 Maypole Farmhouse (called Old Maypole Cottage) was two dwellings; the southern one was occupied by the family of 33-year-old carpenter and joiner Arthur Wren, consisting of his wife Kate aged 26, and their children, Gilbert aged 2 and Ronald aged 7 months. The northern dwelling was occupied by the family of 27-year-old bricklayer’s labourer Percy Muddle, consisting of his wife Laura aged 23 and their daughter Ivy aged 10 months. Kate Wren and Laura Muddle were sisters. Arthur Wren and his family had only moved in a few months before the census and moved to Crowborough by 1915. Percy & Laura Muddle had moved in after their marriage on 27 January 1909 and they had two children born there in 1910 and 1912 before moving across the road to the new Maypole Inn in August 1915 after the death of the previous publican William Marten, who had continued to farm the land of Maypole Farm until his death.

 

 

On 29 January 1912 Frank John Allcorn mortgaged his properties at High Hurstwood, including Maypole Farm, to Miss Sally Marten for £1000.

On the 18 October 1918 the owners of Parkhurst Farm, Mary Elizabeth Egerton and Emily Louisa Egerton, spinsters of 22 Claremont Terrace, Preston, Sussex, with the agreement of their mortgagers sold the freehold field called the Handkerchief Meadow, plot 245 on the 1840 Buxted Tithe Map of 1a 1r 18p, to Frank John Allcorn of Lower Bevendean Farm, Falmer, for £80, half of which money was to go to the mortgagers. This field now became incorporated into Maypole Farm

After Percy and Laura Muddle moved out of the small northern end of Maypole Farm in 1915 it was occupied by Grace Smith, née Coleman, and her husband. Grace played the piano in the Maypole Inn during the First World War. She had a TB hip and wore a special boot. The Smiths moved to Buxted when Bern and Mabel Watson moved into this part of the farmhouse in 1922.

After the death of William Marten in 1915, who had been farming the land of Maypole Farm, his daughter Kate and her husband William Hill took over the farming of the land and started living in the larger southern end of the farmhouse, that had been occupied by the family of Arthur Wren. They had Kate’s nephew, Robert Leeves, living with them there when he started attending High Hurstwood School on 26 July 1915, at the age of 5, because Robert’s mother was in Hellingly Asylum suffering from Religious Mania. They left Maypole Farm and moved to Rocks Farm in 1919 and Bern and Mabel Watson started occupying that part of the Maypole Farm. When Percy Muddle was discharged from the army in 1922 and moved with his family from the Maypole Inn to the larger southern end of Maypole Farm he took over the farming of the land. Percy and Laura’s third child was born in 1923 while they were living in the larger southern end of Maypole Farm house. Laura’s sister Mabel and her husband Bern Watson, who had been living in the larger southern end since their marriage on 13 September 1919, where their only child was born in 1920, moved to the smaller northern end. Bern Watson was a small scale farmer who farmed his father’s land in Perrymans Lane and also rented fields at Parkhurst.

 

 

In 1930 the executors of Miss Sally Martin required Frank John Allcorn, the owner of Maypole Farm, to repay the mortgage of £1000 that he had on his properties at High Hurstwood, so he stated to sell parts of it, on the 24 June 1930 he sold Quarry Cottage for £475 and Nordens Green Cottage for £180 to the then tenants. Then he sold off two pieces of land that were part of Maypole Farm, this was The Common (now Bramble Bank) to Mr D Klein for £130 on 23 August 1930, and the Cricket Field (now the village recreation ground) to Page & Overtons Ltd, owners of the Maypole Inn, for £235 on 9 September 1930. This reduced the land of Maypole Farm rented by Percy Muddle and his annual rent was reduced. Also compensation was paid to the Manor of Framfield for the extinguishment of manorial rights to Frank John Allcorn’s copyhold properties at High Hurstwood and they became freehold.

Then three years later Frank John Allcorn started to sell off the remainder of his property at High Hurstwood. The 28 July 1933 edition of the Sussex Express carried a notice that the Maypole Farm was to be auction in two lots at the Maidens Head Hotel in Uckfield on 30 August 1933. The 28 July 1933 edition of the Sussex Express then reported that lot 1 of Maypole Farm, consisting of the house, farm buildings, including the Wheelwrights, and about 8 acres of adjacent pasture were sold for £625 to Mr E L Robson, whose sub-purchaser was Mrs G Thompson. The other lot consisting of three meadows and woodland of 10¾ acres adjacent to the Maypole Inn was unsold and withdrawn. The sale of lot 1 to Mrs G Thompson was completed on 7 December 1933. This again reduced the land of Maypole Farm rented by Percy Muddle off Mr Alchorne and his annual rent was reduced to £15.

 

 

On 28 February 1934 Frank John Allcorn sold Stone Cottages to Uckfield Rural District Council for £125. Then on 18 November 1935 he sold the remaining part of Maypole Farm, the meadows adjacent to the Maypole Inn, to Mrs G Thompson for £400. Thus resulting in Percy Muddle now renting all of Maypole Farm (now less the Cricket Field and The Common) from Mrs Thompson, though soon after this she took a small part of the land, parts of plots 8 & 9 on the 1840 Buxted Tithe Map, to build a house for the Watson family called Midway (now Boxers).[33]

The 30 October 1936 edition of the Sussex Express reported that at the meeting on 23 October 1936 of Buxted Parish Council Mr C W Thompson announced that he had offered to pay the rent for a period of 14 years on the field opposite the Maypole Inn (the Cricket Field) for use as the village sports ground. Though it was now the village sports ground, it is known that Percy Muddle continued to use this field, which had been part of Maypole Farm, for grazing sheep from Pevensey Marshes during the winter.

It was while the Thompsons owned Maypole Farm, during the latter part of the 1930s, that they had the house reroofed and the three dormer windows at the rear inserted, until then there had only been the one dormer window at the front to let light into the attic. Mains electricity and water were laid on to the village in about 1935 and it was presumably the Thompsons that had the Maypole Farm connected to these services.

 

 

 Laura Muddle’s sister Alice and her husband Charlie Leeves were the publicans at the Royal Oak in High Hurstwood until Alice died in 1937, when Charlie came to live with the Muddle family at Maypole Farm and help with work on the farm. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 the southern end of Maypole Farm, now called 1 Maypole Farm Cottage, was occupied by farmer Percy Muddle, his wife Laura, daughter Ivy, who was a domestic servant, son Denis, who was a farmhand assisting his father, and Charlie Leeves, who was a general farmhand. There were also two other occupants whose records are blanked out and are thought to be two evacuee children that belonged to the school that had recently been evacuated from London with its teachers and was sharing High Hurstwood School with the local school children.

While the Muddle family were the tenants of Maypole Farm they operated it as a dairy farm, their milk was originally sent to a dairy by train from Buxted station, but later they had a milk delivery business around the village. They also kept pigs and chickens and had sheep to graze during the winter. Motive power for the farm was provide by Percy’s horse as they never had any mechanical machinery such as a tractor. Percy Muddle died at Maypole Farm on 16 February 1946 and his wife Laura then continued to operate the farm with the help of her brother-in-law Charlie Leeves, who had been living with them since he become a widower in 1937. Some help at this time was also provide by Laura’s brother-in-law Steve Chilton, who farmed Perrymans Farm and had an agricultural contracting business, by bringing his machinery to help with things like haymaking.

The 30 April 1948 edition of the Kent & Sussex Courier carried a notice by Uckfield Rural District Council that on 12 April 1948 they had made a compulsory purchase order on 4.124 acres of pasture land adjoining the Maypole Inn, this was the Maypole Mead field of Maypole Farm, plot 264 and a small part of plot 8 on the 1840 Buxted Tithe Map, on which the council proceeded to build the council housing estate called Maypole Cottages.

 

 

In mid-1950 the Thompsons put the Maypole Farm up for sale with vacant possession from Michaelmas 1950, so Laura Muddle gave up farming and sold all her farming stock and equipment; the 11 August 1950 edition of the Kent & Sussex Courier carried the notice that the live and dead farming stock of Mrs Muddle would be sold by auction at Maypole Farm on 23 September 1950. The two families living at Maypole Farm now had to find other accommodation, Laura Muddle went to live in one of the new council flats on the Maypole Cottages estate, Charlie Leeves went to live with relatives, and the Watson family went to live in one of the old council houses at Parkhurst Cottages.

The sale of Maypole Farm by the Thompsons was reported in the 5 May 1950 edition of the Sussex Express & County Herald when it was described as consisting of an old Sussex farmhouse, farm buildings, including the Wheelwrights, and about 15 acres of land that would be vacant possession at Michaelmas 1950 and was to be auctioned during June. Then the 2 June 1950 edition reported that it had been sold by private treaty prior to the auction. It had been purchased by Zelpa Agnes Phillips, who was living at Quarry Farm (now Merlins) and whose hobby seems to have been buying old houses and converting them back to something like their original form. So she converted Maypole Farm back to being a single dwelling, removing the second front door, the two single story extensions at the rear, and the ancient extension on the southern end, rebuilding in stone the lower halves of the original southern wall and parts of the original rear wall. She also blocked-off the internal stairs to the cellar and built external stairs to the cellar against the northern wall of the house. When the southern extension with its cat-slide roof was taken down it exposed an upper floor window covered in translucent animal skin, giving some idea of the early date that this extension must have been added to the building. It also exposed the jetted southern wall of the building.

 

 

Zelpa Phillips sold off the two fields behind the new council houses, plot 7 and most of plot 8 on the 1840 Buxted Tithe Map, and originally called Cotties in the manorial records, to ‘Bill’ William Humphreys, who lived at White Coppice and owned Nordens Green Farm, and these fields now became part of Nordens Green Farm. Having completed her conversion of the Maypole farmhouse Zelpa Phillips sold Maypole Farm by auction at the Pump Room in Tunbridge Wells on 25 July 1952. The auction was advertised in the 4 July 1952 edition of the Sussex Express & County Herald when Maypole Farm was described as consisting of a mid-15th century Sussex black and white house together with brick and timber farm buildings and five enclosures of meadow of about 10 acres. The purchaser was Frederick Robert Short, an electrical engineer, and his wife Aileen Joan Short. Aileen was the one who worked the farm while Frederick did contract work. It was during the Shorts ownership that the field above Murgars of about 4 acres was purchased from the owners of Coxbrook and became part of Maypole Farm. This was possibly in about 1954 when the Eustace family sold Coxbrook to the Frank family. It was also during this period, on 26 November 1953, that the Maypole Farm house was listed by English Heritage as grade II*. The curtilage of this listed building included all the land and structures that were then part of the farm, including the Wheelwrights. After six years at Maypole Farm the Shorts sold it to Major David A C Wilkinson in late 1958 and moved to Barnsgate Farm at Heron’s Ghyll.

 

 

When Major David A C Wilkinson purchased Maypole Farm and moved in during December 1958 the farm was 14 acres in size. Major Wilkinson was born in Essex in 1912 and married Marie Wilhelmina Aldworth at Marylebone in 1946. He retired from regular service with the Essex Regiment in 1958 and decided to go into farming. Two years after purchasing Maypole Farm he purchased the nearby Sunnymead Farm of 12 acres and rented the two fields of 6 acres at White Coppice. In an article in the 8 May 1963 edition of Farm & Country it was reported that the Major then had a dairy herd of ten Jersey cows for cream production that grazed the 14 acres of Maypole Farm and their youngsters grazed the rented 6 acres at White Coppice. His 20 sow herd of pedigree Welsh pigs lived out in shelters on the 12 acres of Sunnymead Farm. He also produces hatching eggs for the broiler trade from a 1,200 bird breading flock for which he built a poultry house. He also erected a pig fattening and farrowing house, and a calf rearing house, all in the old orchard at Maypole Farm.

 

 

In the late 1960s Major Wilkinson sold Sunnymead Farm to the Tidy family and then in 1973 he gave up farming altogether and sold Maypole Farm. Details of it being offered for sale by estate agents Rowland Gorringe & Co appearing in the August 1973 edition of Sussex Life. It was purchased by George M S Monkland and his wife Sally. George had been born at New York in the early 1930s as a British Subject, and married Sally Jean Sherrier at Chelsea in 1961.

Major Wilkinson and his wife had moved to the nearby Old Forge from where the Major started an affair with Mrs Monkland that resulted in both couples divorcing. Major Wilkinson and Sally Monkland married in 1975 and the Major moved back to Maypole Farm. Marie Wilhelmina Wilkinson never remarried, she died at Brighton in 1999; George Monkland remarried at Westminster in 1983.

The Major now rented out the fields of Maypole Farm to Bob Tidy of Nordens Green Farm, who used them as grazing for his herd of dairy cows. After five years of marriage to the Major, Sally Wilkinson, who had been born in 1931, died in hospital at Tunbridge Wells in 1980. Major Wilkinson then married Valerie Erskine Ryshworth-Hill in 1985 and they continued living at Maypole Farm until selling it in about 1993, when the Major was in his early 80s. Valerie was an amateur artist who painted murals on several of the walls inside the house, that are now all painted over, and produced designs for the Wilkinson’s Christmas Cards.

 

 

The Major was a Lloyds’ Name (investor with unlimited liability for losses) and when the Lloyds made large losses in the late 1980s and early 1990s the Major lost a lot of money, which resulted in him having to sell the Maypole Farm. The Major and Valerie then moved to Rye where Valerie, who had been born in 1920, died in 2003.

Even though the Wheelwrights was part of the curtilage of the farm and needed legal permission to be separated from the farm the Major sold it separately without permission to blacksmith Robert James, who lived with his parents at Old Cherry Gardens. The Major sold the rest of Maypole Farm to Mrs Green, who wanted to open a kennels for dogs at the farm, but this was objected to by the villagers and she only stayed for about 18 months. The next owners were Mr & Mrs Thomas, who wanted to build an extension onto the northern end of the house for which they had to commission an archaeological survey of that end of the house in 1995, as it was a listed building. Their planning application was refused by the council and they also left after about 18 months.

 

 

Paul and Angela Lorimer purchased Maypole Farm from Mr & Mrs Thomas on 7 December 1996. Bob Tidy had continued renting the fields of Maypole Farm through the changes of ownership until he gave up producing milk in about 1999. The Lorimers then rented their fields, which are all pasture, to David Marley for him to graze his sheep. In about 2001 the Lorimers converted the old barn into a guest apartment, and have had to have much of the rear wall of the house, which is the west side and most exposed to bad weather, rebuilt because of rot in the structural timbers. For this they had to have a full archaeological survey of the house done in 2006. It is this survey by David & Barbara Martin that has been the source of information on the date and original construction of the house, together with the dates and structural modifications that have happened to it over the following centuries.

 

 


[1] ESRO: ADA 114 pages 157A- 158A margin note, Manor of Framfield Court Book 1.

[2] ESRO: ADA 114 page 149B, Manor of Framfield Court Book 1.

[3] ESRO: PBT 2/1/2/9, Will of William Olive proved by the Deanery of South Malling.

[4] ESRO: ADA 114 pages 157A- 158A, Manor of Framfield Court Book 1.

[5] ESRO: ADA 114 pages 182A-182B, Manor of Framfield Court Book 1.

[6] ESRO: PBT 2/1/6/137D, Will of William Olive proved by the Deanery of South Malling.

[7] ESRO: ADA 116 pages 211A-211B, Manor of Framfield Court Book 3.

[8] ESRO: ADA 116 pages 220B-221A, Manor of Framfield Court Book 3.

[9] ESRO: PBT 2/1/7/149, Will of Robert Olive proved by the Deanery of South Malling

[10] ESRO: ADA 117 pages 112B-113A, Manor of Framfield Court Book 4.

[11] ESRO: ADA 118 pages 3-4, Manor of Framfield Court Book 5.

[12] ESRO: ADA 120 page 8, Manor of Framfield Court Book 7.

[13] ESRO: PBT 2/1/9/269 Will of John Alchorne proved by the Deanery of South Malling.

[14] ESRO: ADA 120 pages 49-50, Manor of Framfield Court Book 7.

[15] ESRO: ADA 120 pages 88-89, Manor of Framfield Court Book 7.

[16] ESRO: ADA 122 pages 15-16, Manor of Framfield Court Book 9.

[17] ESRO: ADA 122 pages 29-30, Manor of Framfield Court Book 9.

[18] ESRO: ADA 124 pages 21-22, Manor of Framfield Court Book 11.

[19] ESRO: ADA 124 pages 385-386, Manor of Framfield Court Book 11.

[20] ESRO: ADA 124 pages 463-464, Manor of Framfield Court Book 11.

[21] ESRO: ADA 125 page 61, Manor of Framfield Court Book 12.

[22] ESRO: ADA 125 pages 303-304, Manor of Framfield Court Book 12.

[23] ESRO: TDE 135/1&2 Buxted Tithe Map and Apportionments.

[24] ESRO: ADA 126 pages 114-115, Manor of Framfield Court Book 13.

[25] ESRO: ADA 126 pages 461-462, Manor of Framfield Court Book 13.

[26] ESRO: ADA 128 pages 470-471, Manor of Framfield Court Book 15.

[27] ESRO: QDD/6/12/1 pages 16 & 22, Manor of Framfield 1862 enclosure award.

[28] ESRO: ADA 130 pages 42-45, Manor of Framfield Court Book 17.

[29] ESRO: ADA 131 pages 349-350, Manor of Framfield Court Book 18.

[30] ESRO: ADA 131 pages 377-378, Manor of Framfield Court Book 18.

[31] ESRO: ADA 131 page 362, Manor of Framfield Court Book 18.

[32] ESRO: ACC 7826/47 Lease of Maypole Farm by John Alchorne to Francis Verrall.

[33] ESRO: ACC 7826/12 Papers regarding the sale of Alchorne properties at High Hurstwood.

 

Copyright © Derek Miller 2016

Last updated 8 August 2016

 

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