HIGH HURSTWOOD

ITS HISTORY from the STONE AGE to the 21st CENTURY

 

ITS BUILDINGS AND LANDS, THE FAMILIES THAT OCCUPIED THEM,

AND THE ACTIVITIES THAT WENT ON THERE

 

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The SMITH Family
of Old Hall Cottage

 

 

John & Elizabeth Smith's Family

 

Chart of John & Elizabeth Smith's Family

 

John Smith was the son of Thomas Smith, he had been born at Mayfield in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Dunstan in Mayfield on 10 May 1741. John was residing at Maresfield in Sussex, when at the age of 36, he married 31-year-old widow Elizabeth Bridger, whose maiden name was Martin, at the Parish Church of St Dunstan in Mayfield on 22 May 1777.

Elizabeth was the daughter of George and Ann Martin; she had been born at Framfield in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of Thomas ŗ Becket in Framfield on 18 May 1746. When she was 21 years old Elizabeth married 21-year-old Robert Bridger, who was then residing in Buxted, at the Parish Church of St Dunstan in Mayfield on 29 July 1767. Robert was the son of Robert and Jane Bridger, he had been born at Mayfield and baptised at the Parish Church of St Dunstan in Mayfield on 19 April 1742. Robert and Elizabeth lived at Buxted where they had two children, Jane Bridger baptised on 4 October 1767 and Robert Bridger baptised on 17 September 1769. It seems that about this time Robert became a charge on Buxted Parish, probably because he had become ill, and the churchwardens and overseers of Buxted applied to the Justices of the Peace to have Robert removed to Mayfield, his parish of legal settlement. A removal order was issued on 6 November 1769 to have Robert removed back to Mayfield, which must have happened because he died at Mayfield a few days later, at the age of 27, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Dunstan at Mayfield on 15 October 1769.[1]

There was no mention of Elizabeth and her two children on the removal order, possibly they were not in Buxted but staying with Elizabethís parents or other relatives as Elizabeth had recently given birth to her second child. Whatever happened Elizabeth was back living in Mayfield when she married John Smith in 1777.

John and Elizabeth Smith initially lived at Mayfield with Elizabethís two children from her first marriage, and the first of their three children was born there in late 1777, six months after their marriage. Then in about 1778 they moved into the northern end of the newly built double dwelling cottage called Lime Kiln House in the High Hurstwood area of Buxted Parish, where they were the tenants of John Uridge senior. While living at Lime Kiln Cottage their next two children were born in 1779 and 1781.

There is an inscription on the front corner of this northern end of Lime Kiln House that reads ĎR. Bridger 1782í that is thought may be a memorial to Elizabethís son Robert Bridger, who would then have been 12 or 13 years old, though no recorded of a death or burial for him has been found. There is the burial of a Jane Bridger in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 15 May 1784 that is thought may be Elizabeth daughter, who would have then been 16 years old.

John and Elizabeth and their children continued to live at Lime Kiln House as the tenants of John Uridge senior and then after his death in 1782 as tenants of John Uridge junior. Their youngest daughter, Elizabeth, married in 1806 and went to live in her husbandís parish of Framfield. When John Uridge junior died in 1808 the Smith family became the tenants of William Wilmshurst until their son James purchased Lime Kiln House from William Wilmshurst in 1813.

John died at the age of 73 (not 71 as given on his burial record), and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 6 December 1814. It seems that after Johnís death Elizabethís maintenance, she was now 60 years old, became a charge on Buxted Parish so the churchwardens and overseers of Buxted applied to the Justices of the Peace to have Elizabeth removed to Mayfield, which was her parish of legal settlement. So on the 12 May 1815 the justices signed an order for Elizabeth to be removed to Mayfield and the order was endorsed with the statement that Elizabeth had been so removed that same day.[2]

Itís not known how long Elizabeth remained at Mayfield though it seems likely that she returned to High Hurstwood to live with her son James when he married in 1817, and remained living with her sonís family at Lime Kiln House until she died at the age of 75, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 31 January 1821. Her burial record gives her residence at death as being Hurstwood.

 

 

John and Elizabethís eldest child was James Smith who was born at Mayfield in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Dunstan in Mayfield on 16 November 1777. The following year James moved with his parents to Buxted Parish in Sussex, almost certainly to Lime Kiln House in the High Hurstwood area of the parish.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 8 July 1813 James Smith, then 35 years old, purchased Lime Kiln House from William Wilmshurst for £340 plus taking over an existing mortgage of £100 from William Richardson. No Heriot was due as William Wilmshurst held other property in the manor, and James Smith was admitted to this property on payment of reliefs and fines of 2s 9d to the Lord of the Manor. At the same court James Smith then surrenders this property, on which the yearly rent to the Lord of the Manor was 5Ĺd, to the uses of his will.[3]

James and his parents would have lived in one half of Lime Kiln House and James would have rented out the other half. Jamesí father died in late 1814 then two years later James, now aged 39, married 22-year-old Anne Muddle at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 30 April 1817. Anne was the daughter of John and Mary Muddle; she had been born at High Hurstwood and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 22 February 1795. James and Anne lived in one part of Lime Kiln House where they had three children, born in 1818, 1820 and 1823, the second of whom died when only 4 months old. Jamesí mother, who would almost certainly have been living with them, died in early 1821.

Two years after his marriage, at a Special Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 3 April 1819, it was recorded that on 10 October 1818 James Smith had mortgaged Lime Kiln House to Richard Roots, a carpenter of Maresfield, for £100 at 5% interest.[4] James had presumably taken this mortgage so that he could pay off the earlier £100 mortgage from William Richardson, though confirmation of this was not recorded until 1844.

Anne died at the age of 37 (not 36 as given on her burial record), and she was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 27 May 1832. It was probably Jamesí 13-yearold daughter Sarah Ann who now became housekeeper for her father and brother.

The Buxted Tithe Map of 1840 and Tithe Apportionments of 26 May 1841 recorded that Lime Kiln House, called New House, was then owned and occupied by James Smith. It consisted of plots 1480 and 1481 with a total area was 1 acre, 2 roods, 38 perches on which the yearly Tithe Charge was to be 10s.[5]

In the census of 6 June 1841 James was not at Lime Kiln House, he was probably away working at his occupation as a thatcher. His two children, Sarah Ann aged 22, and William aged 17, were living at Lime Kiln House together with Sarah Annís illegitimate daughter Elizabeth Smith aged 5 months, and Sarah Annís grandmother, Mary Muddle, was staying there, presumably to help look after Sarah Ann and her young daughter.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 19 June 1844 in a writing dated 23 January 1844 Richard Roots acknowledged repayment of all the principal and interest of the £100 mortgage he had given James Smith. And in a writing dated 5 February 1844 the executors of the late executor of the late William Richardson acknowledged that all the principal and interest of the £100 mortgage he had given James Smith had also been repaid. Then at the same court it was recorded that on 23 January 1844 James Smith had re-mortgages Lime Kiln House to George Turner, a gentleman of Fletching, for £100 at 5% interest.[6]

In the census of 30 March 1851 James was a thatcher living at Lime Kiln House with his unmarried son William, who was also a thatcher and probably worked with his father. Also there was his daughter Sarah Anne and her husband Henry Booker, with their two children, Spencer Booker aged 4 and William Booker aged 1, and Sarah Annís illegitimate daughter Elizabeth Smith aged 10.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 23 June 1852 in a writing dated 20 January 1852 George Turner acknowledged repayment of all the principal and interest of the £100 mortgage that he had given to James Smith.[7]

In the census of 7 April 1861 James was living at Lime Kiln House with his son William who never married, his daughter Sarah Anne who was still keeping house for them, (her husband was visiting his parents at Newlands Farm at this time), and Sarah Anneís two sons, Spencer Booker aged 14 and William Booker aged 11. The other part of Lime Kiln House, which James would have been renting out, was occupied by William Mann, a blacksmith, and his family.

When the remaining Wastes of the Manor of Framfield were enclosed in 1862 it was recorded that James Smith was granted, as copyhold, plot 156 of 1 rood 10 perches next to the road on the east side of his property and plot 160 of 22 perches next to the south-west corner of his property. And he was to erect and maintain fences on the east and south sides of this new land where they bordered the road.[8]

James was still living at Lime Kiln House when he on 2 January 1863, at the age of 85, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 9 January 1863. James had made his will on 7 February 1860 and probate of this will was granted to Charles Leeson Prince, a surgeon of Uckfield and the sole executor and trustee of the will, by the District Registry of Lewes on 2 February 1863, when his personal effects were valued at under £20. James left his copyhold property of Lime Kiln House, which he called Old Hall, in trust to Charles Leeson Prince, which he was to let out and from the proceeds after expenses to pay Jamesí daughter Sarah Ann a yearly annuity of £7 and the balance of the profit to go to Jamesí son William. After the death of either Sarah Ann or William the survivor was to get the full profits from the rents, and then when the survivor died the property was to be sold and the monies divided equally between any surviving children of Sarah Ann and William.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 24 June 1863 the death was presented of James Smith, who held Lime Kiln Cottage. No Heriot was due as James Smith had no living beast, and the first proclamation was made for any claim on this property.[9]

Then at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 23 June 1865, on the third proclamation of any claim on Lime Kiln House as a result of the death of James Smith, Charles Leeson Prince came to court and presented the will of James Smith in which he made Charles Leeson Prince trustee of this property, and Charles Leeson Prince was admitted as trustee of these premises on payment of reliefs and fines of 2s 9d to the Lord of the Manor.[10]

 

 

James and Anneís eldest child was Sarah Ann Smith, known as Ann, who was born at Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood within Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 13 September 1818. When Sarah Ann was 13 her mother died, and from then on she is thought to have kept house for her father and her brother William, who never married, and even after she married she stayed at Lime Kiln House and looked after them.

Sarah Ann had an illegitimate daughter in early 1841 and in the census of 6 June 1841 Sarah Ann, at the age of 22, was living at Lime Kiln House with her brother William, her grandmother Mary Muddle, and her illegitimate 5-month-old daughter Elizabeth. Her father was probably away working and was not recorded in this census.

When she was 27 years old Sarah Ann married her first cousin, 20-year-old Henry Booker, at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 12 November 1845. Henry was the son of Richard and Dorothy Booker; he had been born at High Hurstwood and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 10 April 1825. His mother was a sister of Sarah Ann's mother.

Henry and Sarah Ann had two children, both sons, born at Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood in 1846 and 1849. In the census of 30 March 1851 Henry and Sarah Ann were living at Lime Kiln House with their two sons, and also Sarah Annís illegitimate daughter and her father and brother. Henry was a grocerís shopman, and is thought to have been working for a Mr Reed who had a grocerís shop at Newlands Farm in High Hurstwood where Henryís parents lived. In the 1855 Post Office Directory of the Six Home Counties and the 1855 Kellyís Directory of Sussex Henry was listed as a beer retailer and shopkeeper of Hurstwood, so it seems that had probably taken over the grocerís shop at Newlands Farm from Mr Reed and was now also selling beer there. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Henry was recorded as being a visitor at Newlands Farm, his parentís home, and to be an out of business grocer. Sarah Ann was at Lime Kiln House with her two sons, and her father and brother. So it seems that Henryís grocerís shop and beer retailing business at Newlands was fairly short lived.

When her father died in 1863, Sarah Ann inherited a yearly income of £7. In the census of 2 April 1871 she was living at Lime Kiln House with her eldest son, her brother, and a lodger. Then in the censuses of the 3 April 1881 and the 5 April 1891 Sarah Ann was still living at Lime Kiln House, but now with only her brother for whom she was still acting as housekeeper. There was no record of her husband Henry in these last three censuses, even though Sarah Ann was recorded as being married, not a widow. Also her father in his will specifically states that Sarah Annís annuity was to be paid to her, and not her existing husband, or a future one. This seems to indicate that Henry was not thought to be a very satisfactory husband and that sometime in the 1860s he left Sarah Ann and went away; though at the marriages of his sons, he was described as a farmer in 1870 and a shopkeeper in 1872.

During the 1880s the only newspapers people had in High Hurstwood were delivered once a week, by Mr Errey in a pony and trap from Buxted, to Sarah Ann at Lime Kiln House (Old Hall Cottage), people collecting their papers from her there.

In the census of 31 March 1901 Sarah Ann, now aged 82, was continuing to live with her brother, William Smith, at Lime Kiln House. She described herself as being a widow even though her husband, Henry Booker, now aged 76 and describing himself as being married and a farm labourer, was an inmate of the Uckfield Union Workhouse. Sarah Ann died at High Hurstwood, at the age of 85, and she was buried in Holy Trinity Churchyard at High Hurstwood on 18 May 1904. Two years later Henry died at the age of 81 (not 82 as given on his death certificate), his death being registered in Uckfield registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1906.

 

The life and family of Sarah Annís illegitimate daughter is detailed below, for the lives and families of Sarah Annís two sons, Spencer Booker and William Booker, from her marriage to Henry Booker, see the section on ĎHenry and Sarah Ann Bookerís Familyí.

 

 

Sarah Annís illegitimate daughter was Elizabeth Smith who was born at Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood within Buxted Parish, Sussex in about January 1841, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 22 September 1843. In the census of 6 June 1841 Elizabeth, at the age of 5 months, was living at Lime Kiln House with her mother and the rest of the family. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Elizabeth, now aged 10, was living at Lime Kiln House, with her mother, stepfather and the rest of the family. In the census of 7 April 1861 Elizabeth, at the age of 20, was a live-in general servant to the family of retired farmer David Dadswell at Lane End Cottages in High Hurstwood.

When she was 22 years old Elizabeth married 22-year-old Charles Luxford at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 27 October 1863. Charles was the illegitimate son of 15-year-old Philadelphia Luxford; he had been born at Crowborough in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex on 29 August 1841, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 14 November 1841. His mother married Henry Turner in 1845 and Charles was living with them in the 1851 census.

Charles and Elizabeth had five children born between 1864 and 1872. According to the birthplaces of their children, they first lived in Buxted Parish, moving to Rotherfield Parish in about 1865, and then back to Buxted Parish in about 1868.

In the census of 2 April 1871 they were living in Hendall Cottage at Herons Ghyll in Buxted Parish with their then four children, and Charles was a farm labourer. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at Inchreed Cottage in Rotherfield Parish with their four youngest children; Charles was working as a farm carter and his son William, who was a carterís boy, was probably working with him. In this census Elizabeth was also recorded as being a visitor at Bassetts Farm in Cowden, Kent where her eldest son was a live-in farm servant. In this census, at both Inchreed Cottage and Bassetts Farm, family members were recorded with the surname Turner instead of Luxford, this being the married name of Charlesí mother. In the census of 5 April 1891 Charles and Elizabeth were living at Court House Cottage in Beddingham, Sussex with their two youngest children, and Charles was a farm labourer. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 they were living at 24 Bow Terrace in Wateringbury, Kent with their youngest son, and Charles was working as a corn, hay and straw carter.

When Elizabethís half-brother, Spencer Booker, as a trustee of the will of their grandfather, James Smith, sold Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood in 1905 for £375 Elizabeth, according to the terms of their grandfatherís will, was to receive a third share, that is £125.

Elizabeth died at the age of 69 (not 70 as given on her death certificate), her death being registered in Malling registration district, which includes Wateringbury, in Kent during the 1st quarter of 1910. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Charles was working as a labourer and living with his daughter Jane and her husband, Frank Hesman, at Dunmow Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey. He died at the age of 86, his death being registered in East Preston registration district in Sussex during the 3rd quarter of 1928.

 

 

Charles and Elizabethís eldest child was James Luxford who was born in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 12 June 1864. In the census of 2 April 1871 James, at the age of 6, was living with his parents at Hendall Cottage in Herons Ghyll, Sussex. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 James, now aged 16, was a live-in indoor milkman to farmer Herbert Booker at Bassetts Farm in Cowden, Kent. In the census of 5 April 1891 James, at the age of 26, was a live-in farm servant at Inchreed farm in Rotherfield Parish to farmer Edmund Whitewood, whose wife was a related to James by marriage through the Booker family.

When he was 35 years old James married 36-year-old Fanny Hesman in Croydon registration district in Surrey during the 3rd quarter of 1899. Fanny was the daughter of George and Mahala Hesman, and she had been born at Buxted and baptised at the Parish Church of St Mark in Hadlow Down, Sussex on 25 February 1863. She was the sister of the Frank Hesman who had married Jamesí sister Jane Luxford in 1895.

James and Fanny had one child, a daughter, born at Woodmansterne in Surrey in 1900. In the census of 31 March 1901 they were living at Stocklands in Cuckfield, Sussex with their young daughter, and James was working as a cowman on a farm. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at Hattons Green in Plumpton Green, Sussex with their daughter and James was continuing to work as a cowman on a farm.

James died at the age of 50, his death being registered in Lewes registration district in Sussex during the 2nd quarter of 1914. Thirty-six years later Fanny died at the age of 87, her death being registered in North Eastern Surrey registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1950.

 

 

James and Fannyís only child was Ethel Caroline Luxford who was born at Woodmansterne in Surrey, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1900. In the census of 31 March 1901 Ethel, at the age of 8 months, was living with his parents at Stocklands in Cuckfield, Sussex. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Ethel, now aged 10, was going to school and living with her parents at Hattons Green in Plumpton Green, Sussex.

 

 

Charles and Elizabethís second child was William Luxford who was born in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted, Sussex on 22 July 1866. In the census of 2 April 1871 William, at the age of 4, was living with his parents at Hendall Cottage in Herons Ghyll, Sussex. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 William, now aged 14, was working as a carterís boy, probably with his father who was a carter, and living with his parents at Inchreed Cottage in Rotherfield Parish.

William was a miller at Hartfield, Sussex when, at the age of 21, he married 20-year-old Ellen Hoath at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 4 February 1888. Ellen was the daughter of John and Harriet Hoath; she had been born at Buxted on 8 December 1867, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Mark in Hadlow Down, Sussex on 9 February 1868.

William and Ellen first lived at Hartfield where their first two children were born in 1889 and 1890, the second of whom died when only 10 days old. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at Newtons Terrace in Hartfield with their then surviving child, and William was working as a miller. Later they moved to Wateringbury in Kent where their other three children were born in 1899, 1902 and 1903. In the census of 31 March 1901 they were living in Bow Road at Wateringbury, with their then two surviving children and William was working as a corn miller. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at Elmhurst in Hurst Green, Surrey with their four surviving children and their sonís wife and young child. William was now working as a boiler stoker at a sanitary laundry.

William died at the age of 81, his death being registered in South Eastern Surrey registration district during the 2nd quarter of 1948. Six years later Ellen died at the age of 86 (not 87 as given on her death certificate), her death being registered in South Eastern Surrey registration district during the 4th quarter of 1954.

 

 

William and Ellenís eldest child was Ernest William Luxford who was born at Hartfield in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Mary in Hartfield on 27 January 1889. In the census of 5 April 1891 Ernest, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at Newton Terrace in Hartfield. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Ernest, now aged 12, was living with his parents in Bow Road, Wateringbury, Kent. Ernest married in 1909 and had a son in 1910. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 all three were living with Ernestís parents at Elmhurst in Hurst Green, Surrey and Ernest was working as a washhouse man at a sanitary laundry.

 

William and Ellenís second child was Ellen Luxford who was born at Hartfield in Sussex, and private baptised by the Parish Church of St Mary in Hartfield on 22 December 1890. Ellen died when she was only 10 days old and was buried in the Churchyard of St Mary at Hartfield on 27 December 1890.

 

William and Ellenís third child was Florence Elizabeth Luxford who was born at Wateringbury in Kent, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1899. In the census of 31 March 1901 Florence, at the age of 2, was living with her parents in Bow Road, at Wateringbury. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Florence, now aged 12, was going to school and living with her parents at Elmhurst in Hurst Green, Surrey.

 

William and Ellenís fourth child was Alice Jane Luxford who was born at Wateringbury in Kent, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1902. In the census of 2 April 1911 Alice, at the age of 9, was going to school and living with her parents at Elmhurst in Hurst Green, Surrey.

 

William and Ellenís fifth child was Mabel Grace Luxford who was born at Wateringbury in Kent, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1903. In the census of 2 April 1911 Mabel, at the age of 7, was going to school and living with her parents at Elmhurst in Hurst Green, Surrey.

 

 

Charles and Elizabethís third child was Jane Luxford who was born in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 31 January 1869. In the census of 2 April 1871 Jane, at the age of 2, was living with her parents at Hendall Cottage in Herons Ghyll, Sussex. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Jane, now aged 12, was living with her parents at Inchreed Cottage in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex, and she was going to school. In the census of 5 April 1891 Jane, at the age of 22, was a live-in general domestic servant to Henry Wood and Maria Davis at 143 High Street in Lewes, Sussex.

When she was 26 years old Jane married 24-year-old Frank Hesman in Lewes registration district during the 2nd quarter of 1895. Frank was the son of George and Mahala Hesman; he had been born at Buxted and baptised at the Parish Church of St Mark in Hadlow Down, Sussex on 21 August 1870. He was the brother of the Fanny Hesman who was to marry Janeís brother James Luxford in 1899.

Frank and Jane didnít have any children. In the census of 31 March 1901 Frank and Jane were living at White Cottage in London Road, Wallington, Surrey; Frank was working as a cowman and they had 19-year-old gardener Sidney Stanford as a boarder. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at Dunmow Downs Road in Sutton, Surrey; Frank was now a domestic gardener and they had Janeís widowed father living with them.

Jane died at the age of 42, her death being registered in Epsom registration district in Surrey during the 3rd quarter of 1911. Thirty-three years later Frank died at the age of 73, his death being registered in Mid-Eastern Surrey registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1944.

 

Charles and Elizabethís fourth child was Alfred Luxford who was born in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 26 February 1871. In the census of 2 April 1871 Alfred, at the age of 3 months, was living with his parents at Hendall Cottage in Herons Ghyll, Sussex. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Alfred, now aged 10, was living with his parents at Inchreed Cottage in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex, and he was going to school. In the census of 5 April 1891 Alfred, at the age of 20, was working as a farm labourer and living with his parents at Court House Cottage in Beddingham, Sussex.

When he was about 23 years old Alfred married 20-year-old Emma Charlotte Harman in Brighton registration district in Sussex during the 1st quarter of 1894. Emma was the daughter of Frank and Ellen Harman; she had been born at Barcombe in Sussex, and her birth registered during the 4th quarter of 1873. Alfred and Emma had two children; the first was born at Beddingham in Sussex in 1895. In the census of 31 March 1901 they were living at Pony Farm in Findon, Sussex with their young son. They were operating a lodging house there which had nine grooms as boarders who were working at the local racing horse training stables. Their second child was born at Findon in 1903 and then in the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at 2 Gordon Road in Preston near Brighton in Sussex with their two sons and Alfred was now working on his own account at home as a newsagent and tobacconist shopkeeper.

Emma died at the age of 73, her death being registered in Hove registration district in Sussex during the 1st quarter of 1947. Six years later Alfred died at the age of 82, his death being registered in Worthing registration district in Sussex during the 2nd quarter of 1953.

 

 

Alfred and Emmaís eldest child was Frank Luxford who was born at Beddingham in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1895. In the census of 31 March 1901 Frank, at the age of 6, was living with his parents at Pony Farm in Findon, Sussex. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Frank, now aged 16, was working as an ironmongerís shop assistant and living with his parents at 2 Gordon Road in Preston near Brighton in Sussex.

 

Alfred and Emmaís second child was Cecil Luxford who was born at Findon in Sussex and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1903. In the census of 2 April 1911 Cecil, at the age of 8, was living with his parents at 2 Gordon Road in Preston near Brighton in Sussex.

 

 

Charles and Elizabethís fifth child was Spencer Luxford who was born in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 6 October 1872. In the census of 3 April 1881 Spencer, at the age of 8, was living with his parents at Inchreed Cottage in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Spencer, now aged 18, was working as a farm labourer and living with his parents at Court House Cottage in Beddingham, Sussex. In the census of 31 March 1901 Spencer, at the age of 28, was working as a brewerís labourer and living with his parents at 24 Bow Terrace in Wateringbury, Kent.

Spencerís mother died in 1910 and in the census of 2 April 1911 Spencer, still unmarried at the age of 38, was working as a brewerís labourer and living with fellow brewerís labourer John Pearson and his spinster daughter, Sarah Ann, at Malthouse Cottages in Nettlestead, Kent. Later that year Spencer, at the age of 39, married 39-year-old Sarah Ann Pearson in Maidstone registration district in Kent during the 3rd quarter of 1911. Sarah Ann was the daughter of John and Mary Ann Pearson, she had been born at Hunton in Kent and her birth registered during the 2nd quarter of 1872. Spencer and Sarah Ann didnít have any children.

Sarah Ann died at the age of 78, her death being registered in Cuckfield registration district in Sussex during the 4th quarter of 1950. Sixteen years later Spencer died at the age of 94, his death being registered in Uckfield registration district in Sussex during the 1st quarter of 1967.

 

 

James and Anneís second child was Eliza Smith who was born at Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood within Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 2 January 1820. Eliza died when only 4 months old, and she was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 17 March 1820.

 

James and Anneís third child was William Smith who was born at Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood within Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 21 December 1823. Williamís mother died when he was 8 years old and his sister Sarah Ann then keep house for him and his father. In the census of 6 June 1841 William, at the age of 17, was living at Lime Kiln House with his sister and maternal grandmother Mary Muddle; his father was probably away working. Then in the census of the 30 March 1851 William, now aged 27, was working as a thatcher, like his father, and living at Lime Kiln House with his father and the family of his married sister Sarah Ann. In the census of 7 April 1861 William, at the age of 37, was working as a farm labourer and continuing to live at Lime Kiln House with his father and the family of his married sister Sarah Ann.

When his father died in 1863, his fatherís property of Lime Kiln House was put into trust, and William then rented the property from the trustee at £13 per year and would have then sub-rented parts of the property to the other occupiers. As the trustee was to pay William any surplus income from the property after a £7 annuity had been paid to his sister he would have presumably got £6 of his £13 rental back plus any sub-rental from the other occupiers. William never married, and he continued to live at Lime Kiln House, where his sister, Sarah Ann, keep house for him. In the census of 2 April 1871 he was at Lime Kiln House with Sarah Ann, one of her sons and a lodger.

In the Return of Owners of Land 1873, Sussex William Smith of Hurstwood was described as owning 5 acres, 3 roods, 21 perches of land with a yearly rental value of £24 10s, this was not the Lime Kiln House property as that was only 1Ĺ acres and then held in trust by Charles Leeson Prince.

Then in the censuses of the 3 April 1881 and the 5 April 1891 William was living at Lime Kiln House with just his sister Sarah Ann, and he was continuing to work as a farm labourer. In the census of 31 March 1901 William was still living at Lime Kiln House with his sister, but now, at the age of 77, he had presumably retired, as he was not recorded as having any occupation. Williamís sister died during May 1904 and then just over a year later William died at High Hurstwood on 7 June 1905, at the age of 81 (not 80 as given on his burial record), and he was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 11 June 1905.

 

 

John and Elizabethís second child was Sarah Smith who was born in Buxted Parish in Sussex, probably at Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 14 March 1779. When she was 33 years old Sarah married Charles Wood, there is no record of the actual marriage but their banns were called three times at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted, the third reading being on 22 November 1812, so the marriage presumably took place a few days after that.

 

John and Elizabethís third child was Elizabeth Smith who was born at Buxted in Sussex, probably at Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 1 July 1781. When she was 24 years old Elizabeth married 22-year-old John Eade, who was from Framfield in Sussex, at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 22 April 1806. John was the son of Richard and Mary Eade; he had been born at Framfield and baptised at the Parish Church of Thomas ŗ Becket in Framfield on 18 January 1784.

John and Elizabeth lived at Framfield where they had two children born in 1807 and 1810. In the census of 6 June 1841 they were living at Barnett Wood in Framfield with their son John and 20-year-old George Eade, who was probably a nephew. John was a farmer and their son and George Eade were farm labourers, presumably working for John, and they had 14-year-old Eleanor Halford as a live-in female servant. Two years later Elizabeth died at the age 62 (not 40 as given on her burial record), and was buried in Churchyard of Thomas ŗ Becket at Framfield on 15 October 1843. In the census of 30 March 1851 John was a widower and farmer of 10 acres living at Barnett Wood in Framfield with his son John, and his sonís wife and daughter.

 

 

John and Elizabethís eldest child was Harriet Eade who was born at Framfield in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of Thomas ŗ Becket in Framfield on 21 January 1807.

 

John and Elizabethís second child was John Eade who was born at Framfield in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of Thomas ŗ Becket in Framfield on 6 May 1810. In the census of 6 June 1841 John, at the age of 31, was living with his parents at Barnett Wood in Framfield and working as a farm labourer, probably for his father. When he was 39 years old John married Fanny Tyler at the Parish Church of Thomas ŗ Becket in Framfield on 12 August 1849. They had one child, a daughter, born in 1850. In the census of 30 March 1851 they were living with Johnís widowed father at Barnett Wood in Framfield and John was working as a farm labourer for his father.

 

 

John and Fannyís only child was Jemima Eade who was born at Framfield in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of Thomas ŗ Becket in Framfield on 3 February 1850. In the census of 30 March 1851 Jemima, at the age of 1, was living with her parents in the home of her grandfather at Barnett Wood in Framfield.


[1] ESRO: PAR 42232/3/14 Mayfield Removal Order for Robert Bridger from Buxted to Mayfield.

[2] ESRO: PAR 422/32/3/139 Mayfield Removal Order for Elizabeth Smith widow of Buxted.

[3] ESRO: ADA 123 pages 125-126, Manor of Framfield Court Book 10.

[4] ESRO: ADA 123 pages 452-453, Manor of Framfield Court Book 10.

[5] ESRO: TDE 135/1&2 Buxted Tithe Map and Apportionments.

[6] ESRO: ADA 126 pages 314-317, Manor of Framfield Court Book 13.

[7] ESRO: ADA 127 page 496, Manor of Framfield Court Book 14.

[8] ESRO: QDD/6/12/1 page 55, Manor of Framfield enclosure award.

[9] ESRO: ADA 129 pages 245-246, Manor of Framfield Court Book 16.

[10] ESRO: ADA 129 pages 375-379, Manor of Framfield Court Book 16.

 

Copyright © Derek Miller 2016

Last updated 13 August 2016

 

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