HIGH HURSTWOOD

ITS HISTORY from the STONE AGE to the 21st CENTURY

 

ITS BUILDINGS AND LANDS, THE FAMILIES THAT OCCUPIED THEM,

AND THE ACTIVITIES THAT WENT ON THERE

 

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The HOATH & BAILEY Family

 

 

Henry & Jemima Hoathís Family

 

Chart of Henry & Jemima Hoath's Family

 

Henry Hoath was the sixth child and third son of the nine children of John and Anne Hoath. He was born in October 1828 (from the family bible) in the Crowborough area of Withyham Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Michael & All Angels in Withyham on 23 November 1828. He was a second cousin once removed of the John Hoath, who was the originator of the Hoath & Brown family of High Hurstwood. In the census of 6 June 1841 Henry, at the age of 12, was living with his parents at Old Moore in the St Johnís area of Crowborough within Withyham Parish. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Henry, now aged 22, was working as a farm labourer and still living with his parents at Old Moore.

When he was 29 years old Henry married 21-year-old Jemima Homewood at Holy Trinity Church in Tunbridge Wells, Kent on 5 June 1858, at which time they were both living in Tunbridge Wells and Henry was working as a labourer. Jemima was the eldest of the eight children of William and Elizabeth Homewood. She was born at Mockbeggers in Uckfield Parish, Sussex on 2 May 1837 (from the family bible) and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Cross in Uckfield on 28 May 1837. In the census of 6 June 1841 Jemima, at the age of 4, was living with her mother, her father being away at the time, at Vents [6 Wents] in Maresfield Parish, Sussex, which was not far from Mockbeggers. Then in the census of 30 March 18 51 Jemima, now aged 13, was living with her parents at the Crowborough Cross Inn in Crowborough, Sussex, where her father was the publican.

By July 1859 when their only child, a daughter, was born Henry and Jemima had moved to Merton in Surrey where Henry was working as a farm labourer. Soon after this they must have moved to the St Johnís area of Crowborough within Withyham Parish, Sussex as their daughter was baptised at the Parish Church of St Michael & All Angels in Withyham in October 1859, and in the censuses of the 7 April 1861 and the 2 April 1871 Henry, Jemima and their daughter, also called Jemima, were living in the St Johnís area of Crowborough within Withyham Parish, and Henry was still a farm labourer. When their daughter married in March 1878 they were living at Crowborough and Henry had become a wood dealer. Within the family Jemima became known as Old Jemima and her daughter was known as Young Jemima.

 

 

Five months after their daughter's marriage the 6 August 1878 edition of The Sussex Advertiser reported on the Uckfield Petty Sessions held on 1 August 1878 in which the licence of the Crow & Gate public house, on the main road to the south of Crowborough in High Hurstwood Parish, was transferred to Henry Hoath. In the census of 3 April 1881 Henry and Jemima were the landlords of the Crow & Gate and their daughter and her family were living Ĺ mile away at Moulden Wood Cottages in Chillies Lane at High Hurstwood.

Henry and Jemima remained at Crow & Gate for six years and then moved to the Royal Oak public house and Newlands Farm at High Hurstwood when these properties were purchased on 14 October 1884 by William Duvall a grocer of Five Ash Down, whose father John Duvall had been a previous landlord at the Crow & Gate. An inventory of tenant's rights,[1] written by the then tenant, Mary Booker, on 26 September 1884, for the new owner, William Duvall, stated that the new incoming tenant was to be Henry Hoath. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were at the Royal Oak in High Hurstwood, which was a beer house and shop together with a small farm, and Henry was then described as being a farmer. The 2 February 1895 edition of The Sussex Agricultural Express reported that on 31 January 1895 the Uckfield Magistrates granted Henry Hoath of the Royal Oak a four hour extension of hours for a ball on Wednesday 13 February 1895. Later that year Henry died at the Royal Oak on 11 August 1895, at the age of 66, from cancer of the stomach and exhaustion. He was described as being a beer-house keeper on his death certificate. Henry was buried in St Johnís Churchyard at Crowborough on 16 August 1895. The following month the 28 September 1895 edition of The Sussex Agricultural Express reported that at the 26 September 1895 sitting of the Uckfield Bench of Magistrates Mrs Jemima Hoath was granted the license of the Royal Oak beer-house on production of the probate of her late husband's will.

William Duvall sold the licensed premises called the Royal Oak with the Dairy and Poultry farm called Newlands Farm in an auction by agents St John Smith at the White Hart Hotel in Lewes on 6 December 1898 in 3 lots. These lots were described in the sales leaflet:[2]

Lot 1:

Licensed premises at High Hurstwood, Buxted, known as The Royal Oak with the Grocerís Shop adjoining, brick, stone and timber-built and tile-healed.

Containing a Tap Room, with an excellent spacious Beer Cellar; a Dairy, Wash-house, Sale Shop and Private Parlour, with 5 Bedrooms, and an Attic over.

The timber, tile and thatch Farm Buildings consist of a Barn with bay, a Lodge and Stable, a timber and tile-healed Cow Lodge for 4 cows, a Cart Lodge and Fowl House, and an enclosed Yard, also a Piggery.

There is a well of good water.

An enclosure of Pasture and Arable Land and Hop Garden, Orchard and Garden.

Area 3 acres, 2 Roods and 26 perches.

The apportioned Rent of this Lot is £25.

The property is Copyhold of the Manor of Framfield.

OS map numbers 699, 701, 702 & 703.

Lot 2:

Three Enclosures of Excellent Pasture Land, being part of Newlands Farm, Buxted.

Separated from Lot 1 by the High Road, and having an extensive frontage thereto, and containing in the whole an area of 13 acres, 3 roods and 32 perches, of which 3 acres, 2 roods and 12 perches is Freehold.

The apportioned Rent of this Lot is £19-10-0.

This property is part Freehold and part Copyhold of the Manor of Framfield.

OS map numbers 609, 610, 685, 686 & 689.

Lot 3:

A plot of land at High Hurstwood, adjoining lot 1 and abutting on the High Road, containing an area of 1 rood and 3 perches.

In the occupation of Mr Tourle, as sub-tenant. The erections thereon for poultry fattening are the property of the tenant.

The apportioned Rent of this Lot is 10/-.

The property is Copyhold of the Manor of Framfield.

OS map number 700.

The whole of the property is let to Mrs Jemima Hoath at a Rental of £45 per annum, tenant paying usual outgoings.

The land tax on the whole last paid amounted to £1-10-3, and the tithe to £1-17-10.

The Copyhold portion is subject to a Heriot on death, also Reliefs and Fines.

The annual Quit Rent is 3/10Ĺ.

The Rev. John Goring of Wiston Park in Sussex purchased Lot 2 for £450, and he then sent Jemima a notice to quit his property:[3]

To Mrs Jemima Hoath

†††††† I hereby give you Notice to quit and yield up on the 29th day of September next or on whatsoever other day your Tenancy is Acterminable next after the receipt of this Notice. All and every the Lands and Hereditaments part of Newlands Farm late Duvall's which you now hold use or occupy of or belonging to me situate in the Parish of Buxted or elsewhere in the County of Sussex.

Dated the 2nd day of March 1899

†††††††††††††††††††††† †††John Goring

I acknowledge to have received a duplicate of the above written notice this 4th day of March 1899.

Jemima Hoath

March 13th 1899

John Goring then leased Lot 2, on 3 May 1899, to Edward Allfree Smithers and Herbert Welsford Smithers, both brewers of Brighton, for 21 years, at the yearly rent of £21-10-0.[4] It only seems to make sense that brewers from Brighton would lease this farmland if they were the ones who had purchased Lot 1, the licensed premises called the Royal Oak, and Jemima then rented both these properties from them, and a photograph of the Royal Oak dating from about 1910 shows the Smithers name on the front of the building.

In the census of 31 March 1901 Jemima was living at the Royal Oak and she described herself as a beer retailer working on her own account. Living with her was her granddaughter Alice Bailey, who was described as being an assistant to Jemima. It seems likely that Alice had come to live with and assist Jemima around the time of the death of Jemimaís husband in 1895 when she would have been 17 years old.

The 26 December 1902 edition of The Courier reported that Jemima Hoath had been before Uckfield Petty Sessions the previous day for permitting drunkenness on her licensed premises, the Royal Oak. Namely that on the evening of 2 December 1902 Police Constable Clarke had found Edward Smith there in a drunken condition. But as witnesses Alfred Martin, Henry Goodsell and Henry Dadswell all stated that Edward Smith had not shown any indication that he was drunk until PC Clarke had entered the premises the case against Jemima was dismissed. Edward Smith, who admitted to having been drunk, was not so lucky, he was fined 10 shillings.

Itís thought that Jemima continued to run the Royal Oak until Charlie Leeves took it over when he married Jemimaís granddaughter and assistant, Alice Bailey, in 1905. Jemima continued to live at the Royal Oak with Charlie and Alice and when she was 70-years-old, in about 1907, she went blind. In the census of 2 April 1911 she was living with Charlie and Alice at the Royal Oak. She died at the Royal Oak on 9 June 1912, at the age of 75, from bronchi pneumonia and was buried in St Johnís Churchyard at Crowborough on 12 June 1912.

 

 

 

Henry and Jemimaís only child was Jemima Elizabeth Hoath who was born at Walnut Tree Place in Merton, Surrey on 14 July 1859, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Michael & All Angels in Withyham, Sussex on 30 October 1859. In the census of 7 April 1861 Jemima, at the age of 1, was living with her parents in the St Johnís area of Crowborough within Withyham Parish. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Jemima, now aged 11, was still living with her parents in the St Johnís area of Crowborough.

Jemima attended St John's Church of England School in Crowborough, probably starting in 1865 at the age of 5, and probably leaving in 1872 at the age of 12. While at school Jemima made a needlepoint sampler on which she stitched the words 'Jemima E Hoath, aged 12 years, 1872, St John's School, Crowborough, Sussex'.

 

 

When she was 18 years old Jemima married 21-year-old James Alfred Bailey at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield, Sussex on 16 March 1878. James was the ninth child and fifth son of the eleven children of William and Lois Bailey. He had been born in the Rotherfield Parish area of Crowborough on 13 December 1856, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 10 May 1857. In the census of 7 April 1861 James, at the age of 4, was living with his parents at Crowborough Cross, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 James, now aged 14, was a farm labourer and still living with his parents at Crowborough.

James and Jemima had nine children; the first of whom was born just 6 months after their marriage, and the last in 1900. They first lived at 2 Moulden Wood Cottages in Chillies Lane at High Hurstwood in Sussex, where their first three children, Alice, Henry and Albert, were born in 1878, 1881 and 1882, and where they were recorded as living in the census of 3 April 1881, with their then one child, and at which time James was a farm labourer. At the baptisms of their children James was recorded as being a farm labourer until 1888, after which he becomes a wood dealer. In the census of 5 April 1891 they are living in one of the Stonehall Cottages in Royal Oak Lane at High Hurstwood with their then five children, and James was now a timber cutter. They had probably moved to this cottage, which was near the Royal Oak public house, at the same time, October 1884, that Jemima's parents moved from the Crow & Gate public house to the Royal Oak public house. They later move to South View in Burnt Oak Lane at High Hurstwood, probably when it was built in 1897.

 

 

In the census of 31 March 1901 they were living in an unnamed house at High Hurstwood, which was almost certainly South View, with seven of their children, and James was described as being a wood dealer working on his own account. Their two eldest sons, Henry and Albert, were described as being wood dealerís sons, and would have been working for their father. James died at South View on 11 February 1905, at the age of 48, from pneumonia after getting soaking wet while working out in the woods. He was buried in Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 16 February 1905; an inscribed flower holder marks his grave.

When South View was put up for sale by auction in 1916, but not sold, it was described in the sales particulars as a six roomed house; the ground floor consisting of a parlour with stove, a kitchen with range and double cupboards, a scullery with sink and copper and a pantry; the first floor consisting of three bedrooms all with stoves. The outbuildings consisted of a corrugated iron lodge and a timber and corrugated iron piggery. There was a well of good water, a productive kitchen garden and a meadow. The total area being 1a 3r 30p let on a quarterly tenancy at £12 per annum, with the tenant paying rates and taxes.

 

 

In the census of 2 April 1911 Jemima was living at South View with three of her children, Albert, Mabel and Walter. Jemima continued to live at South View until only her youngest child, Walter, was still living with her. Then during the latter part of the First World War, possibly when John George Hobden purchased South View on 12 January 1917, they both moved in with the family of Jemimaís married daughter, Laura Muddle, at the Maypole Inn in High Hurstwood.

Jemima continued to live with Lauraís family after they moved across the road to the large end of the Maypole Farm in High Hurstwood. She was supposed to alternate between living with Laura and with her other married daughter, Mabel Watson, in the small end of the Maypole Farm, but she spent most of her time at Lauraís until she died there on 1 June 1936, at the age of 76, from heart failure.

Jemima was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 5 June 1936 in the grave next to her husbandís; an inscribed flower holder also marks her grave.

 

 

 

James and Jemimaís eldest child was Alice Mary Bailey who was born on 16 September 1878, probably at 2 Moulden Wood Cottages in Chillies Lane at High Hurstwood in Sussex, and baptised at St Johns Church in Crowborough, Sussex on 27 October 1878. In the census of 3 April 1881 Alice, at the age of 2, was living with her parents at 2 Moulden Wood Cottages. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Alice, now aged 12, was living with her parents in a cottage near the Royal Oak in High Hurstwood, and she was going to school. Alice would have attended High Hurstwood School. In the census of 31 March 1901 Alice, at the age of 22, was living with her grandmother, Jemima Hoath, at the Royal Oak, and she was described as being an assistant to Jemima who was the landlady of the pub. It seems likely that Alice went to live with and assist Jemima around the time of the death of Jemimaís husband in 1895 when she would have been 17 years old.

 

 

When she was 26 years old Alice married 26-year-old farmer Charles William Leeves at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 22 March 1905. Charles was the son of Charles and Sarah Leeves; he had been born at Balham in Surrey on 17 July 1878 and by the time of the census of 3 April 1881 he had moved with his parents to Buxted Wood, Buxted, Sussex from where he was baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 25 June 1882. Then by the time of the census of 5 April 1891 Charles was living with his parents at Old Harryís Farm in High Hurstwood, which was just across the road from the Royal Oak.

 

 

Charles and Alice never had children. Itís thought that it was after their marriage that Charlie took over from Aliceís grandmother, Jemima Hoath, as landlord of the Royal Oak with Jemima continuing to live there with them. In the census of 2 April 1911 Charles and Alice were living at the Royal Oak with Aliceís grandmother Jemima Hoath and 16-year-old general servant Esther Mabel McKie. Charles described himself as a farmer working at home, which he would have considered to be his main occupation though he was also a publican. Aliceís grandmother Jemima died in 1912.

Charlie had to collect his beer from Maresfield with a horse and cart, and Alice made homemade wine for sale in the pub. Esther McKie worked for them until about 1925. Then Alice Carr worked for them until about 1932 when Annie Cole took over. While they were at the Royal Oak Charlie kept cows on the small farm that went with the pub, from which they made butter for sale, and Charlie also had force-feed chicken that he kept at Hurstwood Farm in an arrangement with the Tidys, who occupied it, the wife being his sister. The records of Tamplins Brewery show that they purchased the Royal Oak from the brewers Smithers in 1929.

 

 

Alice died on 13 April 1937 at the age of 58 from cancer, she had a growth under her ribs, and she was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood, where her grave is marked by a kerb with paving and an inscribed headstone. Charlie continued to run the pub for a short time with the help of Annie Cole, and a photo of the pub from about this time shows that it sold ĎTamplinís Ales from the wood or in bottleí.

 

 

When Charlie gave up the pub his nephew Len Tidy took it over and Charlie went to live with his sister-in-law Laura Muddle and her husband Percy at the Maypole Farm in High Hurstwood. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Charlie was living with Percy and Laura Muddle at Maypole Farm and described as a general farmhand. During Percyís illness and after his death in 1946 Charlie helped Laura to run the farm until she gave it up in 1950 and moved into a council flat. Charlie then went to live with his sister-in-law Emily Leeves at Lane End Cottages in High Hurstwood until she died on 28 December 1964. After which he went to live with Emilyís son Ted and his wife Ethel, at 2 Jubilee Cottages, Pump Lane, Palehouse Common, Framfield. He was not happy there, and committed suicide there by suffocating himself with a plastic bag over his head on 3 February 1967, at the age of 88. An inquest was held on 6 February 1967. He was cremated, but it is not known what happened to his ashes.

 

 

James and Jemimaís second child was Henry James Bailey who was born on 20 April 1881, probably at 2 Moulden Wood Cottages in Chillies Lane at High Hurstwood in Sussex, and baptised at St Johns Church in Crowborough, Sussex on 26 June 1881. In the census of 5 April 1891 Henry, at the age of 9, was living with his parents in a cottage near the Royal Oak in High Hurstwood and he was going to school. Henry would have attended High Hurstwood School. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Henry, now aged 19, was living with his parents at South View in High Hurstwood, and he was described as being a wood dealerís son, which meant that he was working for his father. At the time of his fatherís death in 1905 Henry was living with his parents at South View.

 

 

When he was 29 years old Henry married 24-year-old Ada May Hobden at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 25 January 1911, at which time he was recorded as being a wood dealer. Ada was the daughter of farmer John George Hobden and his wife Martha; she had been born at Warbleton in Sussex on 5 May 1886 and by the time of the census of 31 March 1901 she was living with her parents at Grovehurst Farm in High Hurstwood.

In the census of 2 April 1911 Henry and Ada were living at Lane End Cottages in High Hurstwood and Henry was working on his own account as a wood dealer. They had two children; the first was born in June 1911 at Lane End Cottages in High Hurstwood and only lived a day, and the second was born in July 1912. By 1917, when their daughter started school, Henry and Ada had moved to Shadwell Cottages in High Hurstwood where Henry kept a cow or two in the field next to the cottage and went out to work doing jobbing gardening. For many years Ada kept a succession of female Cocker Spaniel pet dogs, there was Amy, Jane and Judy, until one day she suddenly took a disliking to dogs.

 

 

Ada's mother came to live with them in 1932, and stayed until her death in late 1933. After her mother's death, Ada inherited a quarter of her father's estate, which she used to purchase, on 9 May 1934, South View in High Hurstwood where her parents had been living. On 13 July 1936 Ada purchased Shadwell Cottages from Heron's Ghyll Estates, which was owned by Baron Rankeillour of Buxted.[5] Then two days later on 15 July 1936 Ada raised a mortgage on South View and Shadwell Cottages, which it is thought she used to pay for her purchase of Shadwell Cottages.

Ada rented out South View and the southern of the two Shadwell Cottages, and continued to live with her husband in the northern one and use the adjacent field that was still owned by Heron's Ghyll Estates. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Henry and Ada were living in the northern half of Shadwell Cottages, Henry was a jobbing gardener and they had 14-year-old Albert Wallace, one of the evacuee school children from London living with them. Ada was then renting the southern half of Shadwell Cottages to the family of Horace and Florence Hopkins.

After Baron Rankeillour died on 14 February 1949 his Heron's Ghyll Estates were sold to Metropolitan Railway Country Estates on 5 January 1950, and they in turn then sold the field next to Shadwell Cottages to Ada on 4 May 1951.[6] Their daughter, with her husband and child, lived with them at Shadwell Cottages from about 1946 until 1953 when they moved to Ada's property of South View.

 

 

When Metropolitan Railway Country Estates sold Shadwell Farm to Peter Thomas Peake on 23 October 1957 it was recorded that 1Ĺ acres of pasture and garden situated just behind Shadwell Cottages was rented to Henry Bailey at £3 per year.[7] It's known that Henry had been using this land for many years, probably since first moving to Shadwell Cottages.

Henry died at Shadwell Cottages on 2 July 1959, at the age of 78, and he was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 7 July 1959. Ada continued to live at Shadwell Cottages, renting out the southern one on the condition that the occupiers would look after her. In 1980 when no one would rent the cottage with the condition of looking after Ada, she had to go into The Wall House Nursing Home in Green Lane at Crowborough, where after about six weeks she died on 20 July 1980 at the age of 94. Ada was buried with her husband in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 29 July 1980. An inscribed headstone marks their grave. Ada left her properties of South View and Shadwell Cottages to her granddaughter Linda Duester, who sold them.

 

 

 

Henry and Adaís eldest child was an unnamed boy who was born on 2 June 1911 at Lane End Cottages in High Hurstwood, Sussex, and who died there the next day from injuries received at birth.

 

Henry and Adaís second child was an Ivy May Bailey who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 28 July 1912 and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 8 September 1912. Ivy went to High Hurstwood School, starting on 24 September 1917 at the age of 5, and leaving on 13 August 1926 at the age of 14. Ivy then went to work on Monica Newman's poultry farm in High Hurstwood before deciding to become a nurse.

Ivy did her nursing training at the Royal Sussex County Hospital in Brighton, Sussex and went on to become an Operating Theatre Sister and then a Midwife. For a time, she nursed upper-class patients, such as Lady Bedford, in their own homes. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Ivy was a State Registered Nurse at 32-38 Kimbolton Road in Bedford, Bedfordshire, which is the north wing of Bedford Hospital. Then during the Second World War she became a Nursing Officer at the Bank of England and after the bombing of London started many of the Bank of England's staff, including Ivy, were evacuated to the bank's facility at Whitchurch in Hampshire where Ivy remained working for them until the end of the war in 1945.

 

 

When she was 29 years old Ivy married 30-year-old George William Duester, who was then a Lieutenant in the Royal Marines, at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 27 June 1942. George was the son of Charles and Louisa Duester and he had been born in a village near Chipping Norton in Oxfordshire on 21 August 1911. George and Ivy had first met at the wedding in 1932 of Georgeís sister Kate, when George, who was a great friend of the bridegroom, Frederick Duester, was best man and Ivy, who Kate had asked to be her brideís maid because Kate had been good friends with Ivyís mother while teaching at High Hurstwood for 18 months before her marriage. Then several years later when both Ivy and George were working in London they met again, by chance, and this time it resulted in their marriage.

 

 

Soon after their marriage George was posted to the Far East where he served until 1946. On his return George went back to his job at the Gas Board in London, and they lived with Ivyís parents at Shadwell Cottages in High Hurstwood. They had one child born in 1947, and then in about 1953 they moved to South View in High Hurstwood, which was owned by Ivyís mother. While at South View they took in lodgers for the extra money; the first was a Pakistani who was working at Bevingford Farm, then in 1956 for a few months it was Miss Nicholas who was temporary headmistress at High Hurstwood School, followed for 3 years by Miss Doreen Killick who was infantsí teacher at High Hurstwood School.

 

 

Ivy died at South View on 31 October 1959 at the age of 47 from cancer, and she was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 5 November 1959; an inscribed headstone marks her grave. George and his daughter continued to live at South View until his daughter left school in 1963, when, being feed-up with the journey to London, George moved them into a flat near Clapham Common in London. George continued to work at the Gas Board as staff clerk and then administration manager until he retired. Then in 1982 George and his daughter moved to a house at Horley in Surrey.

 

 

George died in St Catherineís Hospice in Crawley on 19 October 1989, at the age of 78. He was cremated at Worth Crematorium and his ashes were scattered on Firle Beacon on the South Downs. A seat was erected in his memory on the Ashdown Forest facing the South Downs, the two places that he loved.

 

 

 

James and Jemimaís third child was Albert William Bailey who was born on 18 December 1882, probably at 2 Moulden Wood Cottages in Chillies Lane at High Hurstwood in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 25 February 1883. In the census of 5 April 1891 Albert, at the age of 8, was living with his parents in a cottage near the Royal Oak in High Hurstwood, and he was going to school. Albert would have attended High Hurstwood School. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Albert, now aged 18, was living with his parents at South View in High Hurstwood, and he was described as being a wood dealerís son, which meant that he was working for his father. Albertís father died in 1905 and in the census of 2 April 1911 Albert, at the age of 28, was working as a domestic gardener and living with his widowed mother at South View.

 

 

During the First World War Albert was Private 315203 in the 16th (Sussex Yeomanry) Battalion of the Royal Sussex Regiment and served in Palestine where he caught malaria, which he continued to suffer from after leaving the army at the end of the war. It was probably after catching malaria and when the battalion was moved to France in May 1918 that Albert was transferred to the Labour Corps as Private 620151. For his service during the war Albert was awarded two campaign medals, the Victory Medal and the British War Medal.[8]

When he was 35 years old Albert married his 42-year-old cousin Florence Eva [Lily] Wallis, known as Eva, at St Johns Church in Crowborough, Sussex on 10 September 1918. Eva was the daughter of Joseph and Sophia Wallis; she had been born in the Crowborough area of Withyham Parish on 2 December 1875, and baptised at St Johnís Church in Crowborough on 26 March 1876. Evaís mother Sophia, whose maiden name was Hoath, was the sister of Albertís grandfather Henry Hoath. In the census of 3 April 1881 Eva, at the age of 5, was living with her parents at the Coopers Arms Inn in the St Johnís area of Crowborough. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Eva, now aged 15, was still living with her parents at the Coopers Arms Inn, and she was now going to school. In the census of 31 March 1901 Eva, at the age of 25, was living with her parents next to the Coopers Arms; this would have been the house called The Firs that her father had built next to the Coopers Arms and where Eva was living with her widowed mother when she married Albert.

 

 

Albert and Eva never had children. For a few years they were landlords of a pub at Town Row near Rotherfield in Sussex, before becoming the landlords of the Coopers Arms at St Johns in Crowborough, Sussex for about six years. They then left the pub trade for about two years during which they lived in a house they had bought at Tunbridge Wells in Kent. Then in about 1930 they became landlords of the Lewes Road Tavern at Newhaven in Sussex, which is now called the Ferryboat. In 1937 Annie Cole who had been working for Albertís sister Alice at the Royal Oak in High Hurstwood started working for them. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Albert and Eva are at the Lewes Road Tavern with Albert described as a licenced victualler, and they had Annie Cole living with them as their domestic servant.

Albert died on 30 November 1943, at the age of 60, and he was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 4 December 1943; an inscribed kerb marks his grave. Eva continued to run the pub with the help of Annie for about a year, before she gave it up and they went to live in a flat in an old converted convent in Newhaven. Annie went out to work, but Eva had retired. Then in about 1952 they left the flat, Annie going to live with one of her relatives, and Eva going to live with her brother Edward Alfred Wallis and his daughter Winnie Wallis at Crowborough. Eva was there for the last two years of her life. She died on 1 December 1954, the day before her 79th birthday, and she was cremated at Brighton Crematorium.

 

 

James and Jemimaís fourth child was Kate Jemima Bailey who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 19 January 1885, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 15 March 1885. In the census of 5 April 1891 Kate, at the age of 6, was living with her parents in a cottage near the Royal Oak in High Hurstwood and she was going to school. Kate would have attended High Hurstwood School. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Kate, now aged 16, was a live-in general domestic servant to the family of engineerís lithographer Fred Vernon Hadlow at Parkhurst in High Hurstwood.

 

 

When she was 22 years old Kate married 29-year-old carpenter Arthur Richard Wren at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 18 September 1907. Arthur was the son of Frederick and Agnes Wren; he had been born at Eastbourne in Sussex on 12 February 1878 and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted, Sussex on 16 November 1879. In the census of 3 April 1881 Arthur was living with his parents in New Road at Buxted. Then in the censuses of 5 April 1891 and 31 March 1901 Arthur was living with his parents at High Hurstwood.

 

 

Arthur and Kate first lived at Ivy Cottages in High Hurstwood where their first two children were born in 1908 and 1910. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at Maypole Cottage (part of Maypole Farm) in High Hurstwood with their two sons and Arthur was working as a carpenter and joiner. They then moved to 8 West Street, Beeches Estate, (later known as 8 West Beeches Road) in Crowborough, Sussex, where their third child was born in 1915.

 

 

Kate died of tuberculosis on 12 December 1915, at the age of 30, and she was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 16 December 1915. Her youngest son, Sidney, died of tuberculosis 5 months later, at the age of 9 months, having probably been born with tuberculosis.

Arthur worked as a carpenter at Conners of Crowborough, and after the death of his wife he employed housekeepers to look after himself and his two young sons. During the holidays the two boys would sometimes stay with their aunt Laura Muddle at the Maypole Farm in High Hurstwood and play with her two children, Ivy and Harold. Once when they were riding scooters down Maypole Hill Gilbert fell off and grazed his nose, this subsequently became tubercular and he had the tip of his nose removed.

Arthur's son Ronald died in 1932, at the age of 21, as a result of a motorbike accident, and then his son Gilbert died of tuberculosis in 1936, at the age of 27. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Arthur, at the age of 57, was a carpenter and joiner living at 8 West Beeches Road; he had 42-year-old Alice May Sharpe living with him as his housekeeper and there is a closed record that may be a child of his housekeeper. Arthur continued to live at 8 West Beeches Road until he died on 29 August 1957, at the age of 79, and was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 3 September 1957, in the same grave as his son Gilbert. Inscribed headstones mark both graves of the Wren family in High Hurstwood Churchyard

 

 

 

Arthur and Kateís eldest child was Gilbert Wren who was born at Ivy Cottages in High Hurstwood, Sussex on 7 August 1908 and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 11 October 1908. In the census of 2 April 1911 Gilbert, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at Maypole Cottage (part of Maypole Farm) in High Hurstwood. Gilbert became a carpenter and is believed to have worked for Conners in Crowborough, Sussex, like his father. Gilbert died of tuberculosis on 5 August 1936, at the age of 27; he had probable been carrying tuberculosis all his life, as he always seemed in ill health and depressed, and he was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 8 August 1936.

 

 

Arthur and Kateís second child was Ronald Wren who was born at Ivy Cottages in High Hurstwood in Sussex on 30 August 1910 and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 2 October 1910. In the census of 2 April 1911 Ronald, at the age of 7 months, was living with his parents at Maypole Cottage (part of Maypole Farm) in High Hurstwood. Ronald became a carpenter and is believed to have worked for Conners in Crowborough, Sussex, like his father. Ronald died on 26 August 1932, at the age of 21, as a result of a head injury he received in a motorbike accident; he was buried in his motherís grave in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 31 August 1932.

 

 

Arthur and Kateís third child was Sidney Wren, was born at 8 West Street, Beeches Estate, Crowborough, Sussex on 20 July 1915. Sidney died of tuberculosis on 6 May 1916, at the age of 9 months, having probably been born with tuberculosis. He was buried in his motherís grave in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood, Sussex on 9 May 1916.

 

 

James and Jemimaís fifth child was Laura Elizabeth Bailey who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 17 January 1888, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 15 April 1888. In the census of 5 April 1891 Laura, at the age of 3, was living with her parents in a cottage near the Royal Oak in High Hurstwood, and she was going to school. Laura went to High Hurstwood School and then worked in service at Holly Mount House in Burnt Oak Lane at High Hurstwood. In the census of 31 March 1901 Laura, now aged 13, was living with her parents at South View in High Hurstwood.

 

 

When she was 21 years old Laura married 25-year-old labourer Percy Muddle at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 27 January 1909. Percy was the youngest of the five children of Spencer and Isabella Muddle. He had been born at Huggetts in Fowley Lane at High Hurstwood on 13 April 1883, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 10 June 1883. See the section headed ĎPercy & Laura Muddleís Familyí for the rest of their lives and details of their family.

 

 

James and Jemimaís sixth child was Gertrude Frederica Bailey, known as Gert, who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 4 March 1892, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 5 June 1892. In the census of 31 March 1901 Gert, at the age of 9, was living with her parents at South View in High Hurstwood. Gert would have attended High Hurstwood School. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Gert, now aged 19, was a live-in parlour maid to Goldfinch Henry Hammond, who had private means and was a JP for East Sussex, at The Beacon in Crowborough, Sussex.

 

 

Gert continued working in service at Crowborough until, when she was 22 years old, she married 21-year-old Stephen Henry Chilton, known as Steve, at Five Ash Down Baptist Chapel in Sussex on 12 August 1914. Steve was the son of Henry and Annie Chilton; he had been born at Knockholt in Kent on 12 August 1893 and when he was a young boy he moved with his parents to High Hurstwood. Steve and Gert, who were Baptists and worshiped at Five Ash Down Chapel, lived at Perrymans Grove Farm (later called just Perrymans Farm) in Perrymans Lane at Herons Ghyll, Sussex, where their only child, a son, was born in 1917.

In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Steve and Gert were living at Perrymans Farm, and Steve was a farmer. Living with them was their son Sid with his wife Cath, who had married just eleven days earlier. Also living there was 41-year-old spinster Annie Polhill, who was their housekeeper, and 65-year-old general farm labourer Thomas Streeter, who was presumably working on the farm. Steve and Cath also had Baptist Minister of Religion Leslie Falkner and his wife Nora staying with them. There are six blanked out entries, two of which are presumably the Falkner's children Elizabeth and David. Leslie Falkner was probably the minister at the Five Ash Down Chapel that the Chiltons attended.

 

 

Perrymans Farm was part of Heron's Ghyll Estates that was owned by Baron Rankeillour of Buxted and after his death in 1949 the estate was sold to Metropolitan Railway Country Estates on 5 January 1950, who then sold off the estate piecemeal.[9] On 20 December 1950 Steve and his son Sid purchased Claygate Farm at Heron's Ghyll of 46.636 acres from Metropolitan Railway Country Estates for £3,500 and immediately sold it for the same amount to the sub-purchaser, Leonard and Mabel Tidy.[10] Then the next day, 21 December 1950, Steve and his son Sid purchased Perrymans Farm from Metropolitan Railway Country Estates for £2,600. The total area of the property was 54.884 acres on which the Tithe Redemption Annuity to the Church Commissioners was £5 3s 3d and the Tithe Redemption Annuity to the Tithe Redemption Commission was £1 12s 1d. The Forest Rate was 6d per acre on 29.543 acres. Two parts of the property were subject to tenancy agreements; Stumbereed Field of 3.207 acres was in the tenancy of Mrs Edith May Watson, widow of Lambert Watson, at a rent of £4 10s per year payable at Michaelmas, and Squirrels Land of 16.051 acres was in the tenancy of Bernard Lyle Watson at a rent of £12 per year payable at Michaelmas and had formally been in the tenancy of his father Lambert Watson.[11] Also on 21 December 1950, Steve and his son Sid purchased Ivy Hole Cottages at High Hurstwood from Metropolitan Railway Country Estates for £900 and immediately sold them for the same amount to the sub-purchaser, Charles Herbert Chilton, who was Steve's brother and had been the tenant farmer at Claygate Farm until these property transactions.[12]

 

 

Steve and his son Sid farmed Perrymans and also had an agricultural contracting business. Steve died at Perrymans Farm on 26 August 1957 at the age of 64, and he was buried in the graveyard of Five Ash Down Baptist Chapel on 29 August 1957, an inscribed headstone marked his grave but can no longer be found. Steve's will dated the 10 September 1941 and proved at the District Probate Registry at Lewes on 4 November 1957, left his half of the family business to his son with conditions for the support of his wife from the profits of the business.

Gert continued to live at Perrymans Farm with the families of her son and grandson until in about 1963 the family sold Perrymans Farm. Gert then moved with Sid and his wife Cath to Hailsham and then together with her grandsonís family they all moved into one large house outside Hailsham until in October 1969 they all migrated to Australia.

 

 

They first lived at Charleston, which is about 30 miles east of Adelaide in South Australia. Cathís grandson and his family had a house there and Gert, Sid and Cath had a mobile home close by. Then in November 1976 they all moved to a 150-acre farm at Cambrai, which is about 30 miles north-east of Charleston Gert still lived with Sid and Cath in their mobile home, which they had transported from Charleston. Gert died at Cambrai on 3 November 1981, at the age of 89, and she was buried in Cambrai Cemetery.

 

 

Steve and Gertís only child was James Sidney Chilton, known as Sid, who was born at Perrymans Grove Farm (later called just Perrymans Farm) in Perrymans Lane at Herons Ghyll in Sussex on 7 August 1917. Sid went to High Hurstwood School, starting on 16 April 1923 at the age of 5, and leaving on 31 July 1931 just before his 14th birthday.

 

 

As his parents were Baptists, Sid was only baptised, at the age of 22, at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 3 September 1939 just before he married 25-year-old Catherine Gladys Levett, known as Cath, there on 18 September 1939. Cath was the daughter of Albert and Annie Levett and she had been born at High Hurstwood on 7 December 1913. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Sid and Cath were living with Sid's parents at Perrymans Farm; they then continued living there and working on the farm, with their only child, a son, being born there in 1940.

Perrymans Farm was part of Heron's Ghyll Estates that was owned by Baron Rankeillour of Buxted and after his death in 1949 the estate was sold to Metropolitan Railway Country Estates on 5 January 1950, who then sold off the estate piecemeal. On 20 December 1950 Sid and his father Steve purchased Claygate Farm at Heron's Ghyll from Metropolitan Railway Country Estates and immediately sold it to Leonard and Mabel Tidy. Then the next day, 21 December 1950, Sid and his father Steve purchased Perrymans Farm from Metropolitan Railway Country Estates. And on the same day they also purchased Ivy Hole Cottages at High Hurstwood from Metropolitan Railway Country Estates and immediately sold them to Charles Herbert Chilton, who was Sid's uncle and had been the tenant farmer at Claygate Farm until these property transactions. See the above section on Sid's parents for full details of these three property transactions.

Sid's father died in August 1957 and Sid inherited the farm on the condition that he looked after his mother. Then on 1 November 1957 Sid purchased from Metropolitan Railway Country Estates for £400, 10.374 acres of arable and pasture land adjoining the northern boundary of Perrymans Farm that had been part Shadwell Farm owned by the Heron's Ghyll Estates. On this land the Tithe Redemption Annuity to the Church Commissioners was £1 12s 4d: the Tithe Redemption Annuity to the Tithe Redemption Commission was 10d and the Forest Rate was 5s 6d.[13]

In about 1963 the family sold Perrymans Farm. Sid, Cath and Sid's mother moved to Hailsham where Sid worked as a tipper truck driver for Fuller at Heathfield. Their son David and his family also moved to Hailsham in about 1966 and Sid and his son then worked together doing up houses. They finally all moved into one large house outside Hailsham and their little business was doing quite well until the taxman's demands upset David, and in October 1969 they all migrated to Australia.

 

 

They first lived at Charleston, which is about 30 miles east of Adelaide in South Australia. Sid and Cathís son and his family had a house there, and Sid, Cath and Sidís mother had a mobile home close by. Sid worked in a cheese factory. Then in 1974 a devastating typhoon flattened Darwin, and their son David, who had been driving his own truck, bought a second truck and semi-trailer, and together with Sid used them to transport mobile homes to Darwin. They wanted to get back into farming, so in November 1976 they all moved to a 150-acre farm at Cambrai, which is about 30 miles north-east of Charleston, where they started a piggery. Sid, Cath, and Sidís mother still lived in their mobile home, which they had transported from Charleston. Their son David decided that he had had enough of always being away from home driving, so they gave up their trucking business.

 

 

Sidís mother died at Cambrai in November 1981 and soon afterwards the rest of the family moved to the east of the Murray River, to a larger farm of 1500 acres at Mercunda, which is about 50 miles east of Cambrai and 100 miles east of Adelaide, so that they could expand their farming business. Sid and Cathís son David and his family lived in the farmhouse while Sid and Cath lived in a separate little house on the farm. They grow wheat and oats and had a herd of cows and calves, and they also did contract work at harvest time. Their grandsons, Mark and Anthony, also work in the family business.

 

 

In 1999 Cathís health got so bad that Sid could no longer look after her at home, and she had to go into a nursing home. But after only a few weeks at the home she suffered a stroke that affected her throat and she had to be admitted to hospital, where on 24 May 1999 she died at the age of 85. Cath was buried at Loxton. Five years later Sid died at home on the 1 February 2005, at the age of 87.

 

 

James and Jemimaís seventh child was Lilian Lois Bailey who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 3 December 1894, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 31 March 1895. In the census of 31 March 1901 Lilian, at the age of 6, was living with her parents at South View in High Hurstwood. Lilian would have attended High Hurstwood School. After she left school she worked for the Warburtons at Parkhurst in High Hurstwood, even though she was ill with TB. Lilian died of tuberculosis on 16 October 1909, at the age of 14, and was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 21 October 1909, in a grave that is marked by an inscribed flower holder, and is next to her parentís graves.

 

 

James and Jemimaís eighth child was Mabel Florence Bailey who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 21 November 1897, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 23 January 1898. In the census of 31 March 1901 Mabel, at the age of 3, was living with her parents at South View in High Hurstwood. Mabel's father died in 1905 and in the census of 2 April 1911 Mabel, now aged 13, was living with her widowed mother at South View. Mabel went to High Hurstwood School until she was 14. She then worked for her elder sister, Alice, at the Royal Oak Pub in High Hurstwood, and then from about 1916 she worked for her sister Laura at the Maypole Inn in High Hurstwood.

 

 

When she was 21 years old Mabel married 29-year-old farmer Bernard Lyle Watson, known as Bern, at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 13 September 1919. Bern was the son of Lambert and Harriet Watson and he had been born at High Hurstwood on 28 January 1890. Bern and Mabel first lived in the large southern end of the Maypole Farm in High Hurstwood, where their only child was born in 1920. They moved to the small northern end of Maypole Farm, known as Maypole Cottage, in 1922, and that was where they were living with their daughter in the National Register of 29 September 1939 when Bern was described as a farmer assisting his father.

 

 

Bern rented a field and cowshed at Parkhurst in High Hurstwood where he kept a milk cow, and he worked on his father's farm at The Bungalow in Perrymans Lane, High Hurstwood until his father died in 1942. Bern then took over his father's tenancy of the four of the fields of 20 acres called Squirrels Land that were part of Heron's Ghyll Estates at £15 per year rent and farmed these as well as the field at Parkhurst. In the 1930s Bern would go by horse and cart to Buxted Mill to collect his animal feed. During the Second World War Bern was a corporal in the Home Guard. Mabel did some daily housework for a while but mostly she worked as a farmer's wife, making butter from their cow's milk, feeding their chickens etc.

 

 

When their landlord Mr Thompson sold the Maypole Farm they had to get out, and in August 1950 they moved to a council house at 2 Parkhurst Cottages in Perrymans Lane, at the same time as Mabel's sister Laura Muddle moved out of the other end of the Maypole Farm. They continued farming the land they rented, and when Heron's Ghyll Estates was sold off piecemeal in 1950 the ownership of Squirrels Land became split between Perrymans Farm, owned by Bern's relatives Steve and Sid Chilton, and Claygates Farm owned by Len Tidy. Bern then continued to farm the three Squirrels Land fields owned by the Chiltons at a rent of £12 per year, but had to give them up when his sight began to go. Bern would collect apples from the orchards at Parkhurst and The Bungalow, and take them to Uckfield by horse and cart to have them pressed for the juice, which they then made into cider. They continued to keep their milk cows at Parkhurst, and even when Bern went blind in 1956 he would be taken up to Parkhurst to milk them.

 

 

In November 1960 Bern had to go into the Kent & Sussex Hospital at Tunbridge Wells for an emergency operation for a duodenal ulcer from which he recovered and soon returned home. But it was then or soon after this, in the early 1960s, that they finally had to give up their cows and the land at Parkhurst. Then in 1965 Bern got gangrene in one of his feet and in August he had to go into the Kent & Sussex Hospital where he had at least two operations; initially to amputate his foot and then a large part of his leg. But this was not successful in saving him and after more than four months in hospital Bern died in the Kent & Sussex Hospital on 3 January 1966, at the age of 75. He was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 8 January 1966. An obituary for Bern by the Rev. E H Phillips was published in the February 1966 edition of the High Hurstwood Parish Review:

In dear Bernard Watson the village has lost not only a true villager, who perhaps knew the village's past history, work and people better than anyone else, but also one who loved the village and, I can say with all sincerity, was loved and admired by all. He had much to bear and suffer during the last years of his life, the more so as he was always so active and took such a keen interest in everything concerning the village, its life and its people. He took it all bravely, without ever a murmur of discontent, brave, thoughtful man that we all knew him to be. "There goes a MAN". May his reward be rest and peace, and may the memory of such courage and thought only for others bring comfort and courage to her whom he has left behind.

 

 

All this time their daughter Joyce and her two children, Robin and Sheila, had been living with them, but now they started to marry and move away, Robin in 1970, Joyce in 1971 and Sheila in 1973. Mabel was now living by herself so she moved to a council flat at Maypole Cottages in High Hurstwood in late 1973. She lived there for fifteen years, until she died there on 14 August 1988, at the age of 90. Mabel was cremated at Tunbridge Wells Crematorium on 23 August 1988. Then about a week later there was a memorial service at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood when her ashes were buried in her husbandís grave in the churchyard. An inscribed headstone marks their grave.

 

 

 

Bern and Mabelís only child was Joyce Evelyn Watson who was born in the large southern end of the Maypole Farm in High Hurstwood, Sussex on 30 September 1920, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 21 November 1920. Joyce went to High Hurstwood School, starting on 5 October 1925, at the age of five, and leaving at the end of the summer term in 1935 when she was nearly fifteen. She then did daily housework at Parkhurst Lodge, Holly Mount, The Forge, and for the Tylers at the Village Shop, all in High Hurstwood. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Joyce was living with her parents in the small northern end of Maypole Farm. Then during the Second World War Joyce did farm work for her uncle and aunt, Steve and Gert Chilton, at Perrymans Farm in Parrymans Lane, High Hurstwood.

 

 

After the war when she was 25 years old Joyce married 24-year-old George Chappell, who was then an army driver from Little Budwater, near Tarpaley, Cheshire, at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 4 May 1946. George was the son of Albert Chappell and he had been born on 15 August 1921. George and Joyce lived with Joyceís parents at the Maypole Farm and had two children born in early 1947 and late 1948, but they had separated before the second was born, and after living at Crowborough for at while George ended up returning to his home county of Lancashire.

 

 

Joyce and her two children continued to live with her parents at Maypole Farm, and then from 1950 at 2 Parkhurst Cottages, Perrymans Lane, High Hurstwood. When her children started school Joyce returned to daily housework, for the Yates at Heron Brook (the new name for Parkhurst Lodge) and for the comedian Cyril Fletcher at Parkhurst. In 1966 the Spinks family replaced the Fletchers at Parkhurst and Joyce continued working there for them. The Spinks family brought their gardener Alf Mee with them to High Hurstwood, and in 1970 he moved into 1 Ashdene Cottages in Rocks Lane, High Hurstwood, which was owned by the Spinks. This was how Joyce met Alf, and as they wanted to marry Joyce finally divorced her first husband after about twenty years of separation.

 

 

When she was 50 years old Joyce married 50-year-old Alfred William Allen Mee, known as Alf, at Crowborough Register Office in Sussex on 27 March 1971. Alf was the son of Alfred and Florence Mee and he had been born in Hackney registration district in London on 15 August 1920. He had married Pamela D Merritt at Hove in Sussex in 1947 and they had two sons before their marriage ended in divorce.

 

 

Alf and Joyce lived at 1 Ashdene Cottages and both worked for the Spinks family, as well as Alf doing other gardening work and Joyce other housework. In 1978 the Spinks family moved out of Parkhurst to be replaced by the family of the local Tory MP Geoffrey Johnson-Smith, who also now owned Ashdene Cottages. Joyce and Alf now worked for the Johnson-Smiths and lived in their property at Ashdene Cottages, but things didn't go well and in 1984 Joyce and Alf moved to a council flat at 80 Gordon Road in Buxted. They both left the employment of the Johnson-Smiths, but continued their employment at other places in and around High Hurstwood. Even after reaching retirement age both Joyce and Alf continued with part-time work, Joyce still doing housework and Alf gardening. They were both active members of Holy Trinity Church in High Hurstwood and Alf was a member of the Buxted branch of the British Legion, for which he was standard-bearer for many years.

 

 

In 1997 they moved from their flat in Buxted to a sheltered council flat at Streatfield House in Uckfield. Later that year Alf died by taking his own life at their home in Uckfield on 7 November 1997, at the age of 77. He was cremated on 20 November 1997 at the Kent & Sussex Crematorium in Tunbridge Wells after a service at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood. Alf's ashes were later buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood.

Joyceís first husband, George Chappell, died at the age of 81, his death being registered in Lancaster registration district during May 2003.

Joyce continued to live in the flat at Streatfield House until her deteriorating health resulted in her having to move to Woodlands Residential Home in Beacon Road, Crowborough in late 2008. Further deterioration in her health resulted in Joyce moving to Harecombe Manor Nursing Home in Crowborough on 13 March 2012, where she died on 31 March 2012, at the age of 91. Joyce was cremated on 13 April 2012 at the Kent & Sussex Crematorium in Tunbridge Wells followed the same day by a Service of Thanksgiving at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood. Her ashes were later buried with her Alf's in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood, where they are marked by an inscribed tablet.

 

 

 

James and Jemimaís ninth child was Walter Jim Bailey who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 15 October 1900, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 13 January 1901. In the census of 31 March 1901 Walter, at the age of 5 months, was living with his parents at South View in High Hurstwood. Walterís father died in 1905 and in the census of 2 April 1911 Walter, now aged 10, was going to school and living with his widowed mother at South View. Walter would have attended High Hurstwood School.

 

 

When he was 22 years old Walter married 21-year-old Eliza Fanny Vine, known as Fan, at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 28 October 1922, at which time he was recorded as being a farm labourer. Fan was the daughter of Walter and Leah Vine and she had been born at Waldron in Sussex on 25 January 1901. Walter and Fan first lived with Fanís parents at Stonehouse Farm in High Hurstwood, where their two children were born in 1923 and 1925, and where Walter worked as a cowman. Then in about 1928 they moved to Coles Hall Cottage at Five Ashes in Sussex. They moved again in about 1937, down the road to 1 Dudsland Cottages at Cross-in-Hand, where they were living with their two children in the National Register of 29 September 1939, when Walter was described as a smallholder working on his own account and a farm labourer. Walter continued working for farms in this area of Five Ashes and Cross-in-Hand, and even continued to do part-time farm work after he retired.

 

 

Walter died at Five Ashes on 9 June 1979, at the age of 78. He was cremated at the Kent & Sussex Crematorium in Tunbridge Wells where his ashes were scattered. Eighteen months later Fan sold Dudsland Cottage and went to live for a while with her son Ned and his wife before going into a nursing home in Eastbourne. Later she moved to a nursing home at Jarvis Brook, and then finally to Ivy Hall nursing home in Crowborough, where she died on 19 October 1987, at the age of 86. Fan was cremated at the Kent & Sussex Crematorium in Tunbridge Wells and her ashes were scattered there.

 

 

 

Walter and Fanís eldest child was Edward James Bailey, known as Ned, who was born at Stonehouse Farm in High Hurstwood, Sussex on 20 October 1923, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 23 December 1923. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Ned, at the age of 15, was working as a garden boy at a private house and living with his parents at 1 Dudsland Cottages in Cross-in-Hand. Ned later worked as a farm labourer on a farm at Five Ashes.

When he was 30 years old Ned married 26-year-old Joyce Eileen Minns at Christ Church in Eastbourne, Sussex on 18 September 1954. Joyce was the daughter of Ernest and Ethel Minns and she had been born at Eastbourne on 9 December 1927. After their marriage Ned got a job with Eastbourne Council, farming council land at Beachy Head, and they lived at East Dean in a cottage that went with Nedís job. They did not have children of their own, but have an adopted daughter. Joyceís mother came to live with them after her husband died in 1967.

Ned died on 5 August 1981, at the age of 57. Then in November 1981 Joyce and her mother moved to Eastbourne, where Joyce has lived by herself since her motherís death in 1985.

 

 

Walter and Fanís second child was Dorothy May Bailey, known as Dolly, who was born at Stonehouse Farm in High Hurstwood, Sussex on 13 February 1925, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 19 April 1925. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Dolly, at the age of 14, was working as a draper's shop assistant and living with her parents at 1 Dudsland Cottages in Cross-in-Hand.

When she was 23 years old Dolly married 33-year-old Henry Thomas Mitchell, known as Tom, at the Parish Church of St Dunstan in Mayfield, Sussex on 18 September 1948. Tom was the son of Charles and Emily Mitchell and he had been born at Eridge in Sussex on 9 June 1915. Tom and Dolly had two children born in 1949 and 1953. They first lived in a cottage at Stroods in Herons Ghyll, Sussex. Then in 1950 they moved up the road to one of the Pound Gate Cottages, which Tom had purchased for £300. Tom was always a gardener, working at Stroods, Temple Grove, and other places in the area until he retired.

They continued to live at Pound Gate Cottages with their youngest daughter. Then Dollyís deteriorating health required that she had to go into Copper Beech Nursing Centre in Crowborough where she died on 8 December 2006, at the age of 81, from bowel cancer. Her funeral service was at the Kent and Sussex Crematorium in Tunbridge Wells on 19 December 2006, and her ashes interred in a private memorial plot on land owned by her daughter Jenny and her husband at Bells Yew Green.

Tom continued to live with his unmarried youngest daughter at Pound Gate Cottages until he had to go into Forest Lodge Nursing Home at Nutley where he died on 4 March 2010, at the age of 94. His funeral service was at the Kent and Sussex Crematorium in Tunbridge Wells on 23 March 2010. His ashes were scattered on Ashdown Forest.

 

 


[1] WSRO: WISTON/791 Inventory & valuation of tenant's rights for Newlands Farm, 26 Sep 1884.

[2] WSRO: WISTON/783 Sales leaflet for auction of Newlands Farm, 6 Dec 1898.

[3] WSRO: WISTON/786 Notice for Jemima Hoath to quit Newlands Farm, 2 Mar 1899.

[4] WSRO: WISTON/788 Lease of part of Newlands Farm to brewers Smithers, 3 May 1899.

[5] ESRO: BMW A/14/16/2 Strutt & Parker Sales & Purchases Book J.

[6] ESRO: BMW A/14/19/3 Strutt & Parker Sales & Purchases Book M.

[7] ESRO: BMW A/14/21/13 Strutt & Parker Sales & Purchases Book O.

[8] TNA: WO 372/1 First World War Medal Card for Albert W Bailey.

[9] ESRO: BMW A/14/18/43 Strutt & Parker Sales & Purchases Book L.

[10] ESRO: BMW A/14/18/64 Strutt & Parker Sales & Purchases Book L.

[11] ESRO: BMW A/14/18/63 Strutt & Parker Sales & Purchases Book L.

[12] ESRO: BMW A/14/18/65 Strutt & Parker Sales & Purchases Book L.

[13] ESRO: BMW A/14/21/14 Strutt & Parker Sales & Purchases Book O.

 

Copyright © Derek Miller 2013-2016

Last updated 26 July 2016

 

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