HIGH HURSTWOOD

ITS HISTORY from the STONE AGE to the 21st CENTURY

 

ITS BUILDINGS AND LANDS, THE FAMILIES THAT OCCUPIED THEM,

AND THE ACTIVITIES THAT WENT ON THERE

 

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The DUVALL Family

 

 

George & Mary Duvallís Family

 

Chart of George & Mary Duvall's Family

 

George Duvall was the son of John and Mary Devall; he had been born at Uckfield in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Cross in Uckfield on 19 August 1759. When he was about 30 years old George married Mary and for about the first ten years of their marriage they lived in Buxted Parish where they had three children, a son born in 1790 and daughters born in 1792 and 1798. A George Duvall witnessed two documents for George Medley of Buxted Place in 1791 and 1793,[1] so assuming this was not some other George Duvall, it seems likely that George, who is known to have been a gamekeeper, was then working as a gamekeeper for the Buxted Estate and most likely living in one of the estate cottages. Then in about 1800 George and his family move to Withyham in Sussex where George was working as a gamekeeper to the Duchess of Dorset at Bolebrook Manor in Withyham when the 8 November 1802 edition of The Sussex Weekly Advertiser reported that he was issued with a gamekeeper's certificate. George and Mary's fifth child was a son born at Withyham in 1804.

They later moved to Rotherfield Parish where Mary died at the age of 72, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Denys on 25 August 1833. In the census of 6 June 1841 George, at the age of 81, was living alone at Crowborough in Rotherfield Parish and describing himself as a farm labourer. He later went to live with the family of his son John Duvall at Mill Farm in High Hurstwood, where his son died in early 1851 and in the census of 30 March 1851 George was living with his sonís widow, Phoebe Duvall, and his grandson John Duvall, in the Mill House and described as formerly a gamekeeper. George is thought to have continued to live at Mill House with his grandson John and wife Charlotte after Phoebe remarried and moved away. He was certainly living in Buxted Parish, probably at the Mill House in High Hurstwood, when he died at the age of 96, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 24 November 1856.

 

 

George and Maryís eldest child was George Duvall who was born in Buxted Parish in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 22 August 1790.

When he was 39 years old George married Ann Bushell at the parish Church of St Nicolas in North Stoneham near Southampton, Hampshire on 16 July 1830, and their first child was born at North Stoneham in December 1830. They then moved to Up Marden, which is a few miles north of Chichester in Sussex, where they had five children born between 1836 and 1841. In the census of 6 June 1841 they were living at Old Lox Ash in Up Marden with their six children and George was working as a gamekeeper. They had two more children born at Up Marden in 1843 and 1844 before they moved to Donnington, which is just to the south of Chichester, where their last two children were born in 1846 and 1849, to make a total of ten children. In the census of 30 March 1851 they were living at North End in Donnington with seven of their children and George was continuing to work as a gamekeeper.

By 1860 they had moved to High Hurstwood where in the census of 7 April 1861 they were living in one half of Snatts (now Shadwell Cottage) with their four youngest children and George, at the age of 70, was still a gamekeeper. They later moved to Maresfield where George died at the age of 79, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Bartholomew at Maresfield on 26 March 1870. In the census of 2 April 1871 Ann was living with the family of her daughter Julia Norman in Maresfield Village. She died at the age of 71, her death being registered in Uckfield registration district during the 2nd quarter of 1877.

 

 

George and Annís eldest child was Mary Ann Duvall who was born at North Stoneham near Southampton, Hampshire and baptised at the Parish Church of St Nicolas in North Stoneham on 12 December 1830. In the census of 6 June 1841 Mary Ann, at the age of 10, was living with her parents at Old Lox Ash in Up Marden near Chichester, Sussex. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Mary Ann, now aged 20, was a live-in nurse to the family of landed proprietor Charles Crosbie at Northlands in East Ashling near Chichester, and her sister Louisa was also there as a live-in under housemaid.

 

George and Annís second child was Louisa Duvall who was born at Up Marden near Chichester, Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Michael in Up Marden on 17 January 1836. In the census of 6 June 1841 Louisa, at the age of 5, was living with her parents at Old Lox Ash in Up Marden. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Louisa, now aged 15, was a live-in under housemaid to the family of landed proprietor Charles Crosbie at Northlands in East Ashling near Chichester, and her sister Mary Ann was also there as a live-in nurse.

When she was 23 years old Louisa married 25-year-old William Kenward at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 7 February 1860. William was the son of Kendrick and Charlotte Kenward, he was born at Brook House near Burnt Oak in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 4 May 1834.

In the census of 7 April 1861 William and Louisa were living in a cottage between Woodbine Cottage and Millwrights Cottage in Uckfield. William was working as a journeyman miller and they had they had 18-year-old journeyman millwright Thomas Baker as a lodger. William was presumably working for his namesake William Kenward at nearby Uckfield Mill.

 

George and Annís third child was Jane Duvall who was born at Up Marden near Chichester, Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Michael in Up Marden on 4 June 1837. In the census of 6 June 1841 Jane, at the age of 4, was living with her parents at Old Lox Ash in Up Marden. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Jane, now aged 13, was going to school and living with her parents at North End in Donnington near Chichester. In the census of 7 April 1861 Jane, at the age of 23, was a live-in domestic servant to the family of solicitor Charles Deaco at Poplars Oak in Nursling, Hampshire.

When she was 26 years old Jane married 25-year-old Henry Wood at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 2 July 1863. Henry was the son of John and Sarah Wood; he had been born at Tandridge in Surrey and baptised at the Parish Church of St Peter in Tandridge on 1 October 1837. At the time of his marriage Henry was a Sergeant in the Royal Marines stationed at Walmer in Kent.

In the census of 2 April 1871 Jane and her four children, who had all been born at Gosport in Hampshire, were living at 44 Albert Street in Alverstoke, Hampshire and Jane described herself as a Colour Sergeant's wife. Henry was discharged from the Royal Marines in 1876 having served the twelve years that he had enlisted for. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Henry and Jane and their three sons were living in Unicorn Buildings, Anglesea Road, Portsea, Hampshire and Henry was an assistant prison warder.

 

George and Annís fourth child was Frances Duvall who was born at Up Marden near Chichester, Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Michael in Up Marden on 27 January 1839. In the census of 6 June 1841 Frances, at the age of 3, was living with her parents at Old Lox Ash in Up Marden. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Frances, now aged 12, was going to school and living with her parents at North End in Donnington near Chichester. In the census of 7 April 1861 Frances, at the age of 23, was a live-in housemaid to chaplain John Turner at Crowborough, Sussex. Frances never married. She died at the age of 34, her death being registered in Uckfield registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1873.

 

George and Annís fifth child was Elizabeth Duvall who was born at Up Marden near Chichester, Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Michael in Up Marden on 23 February 1840. In the census of 6 June 1841 Elizabeth, at the age of 2, was living with her parents at Old Lox Ash in Up Marden. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Elizabeth, now aged 11, was going to school and living with her parents at North End in Donnington near Chichester.

When she was 22 years old Elizabeth married Benjamin Ladhams at the Parish Church of St Nicholas in Millbrook near Southampton, Hampshire on 24 December 1862. In the census of 2 April 1871 Benjamin and Elizabeth were living in Foundry Lane at Millbrook with their four children. Benjamin was a seedsman and florist employing three labourers and they had Elizabethís brother John Henry Duvall staying with them.

 

George and Annís sixth child was Edward Duvall who was born at Up Marden near Chichester, Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Michael in Up Marden on 2 May 1841. In the census of 6 June 1841 Edward, at the age of 2 months, was living with his parents at Old Lox Ash in Up Marden. In about 1845 Edward moved with his parents to Donnington near Chichester where he died at the age of 5, and was buried in the Churchyard of St George at Donnington on 5 July 1846.

 

George and Annís seventh child was Julia Duvall who was born at Up Marden near Chichester, Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Michael in Up Marden on 8 January 1843. In the census of 30 March 1851 Julia, at the age of 8, was going to school and living with her parents at North End in Donnington near Chichester. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Julia, now aged 18, was living with her parents in one half of Snatts (now Shadwell Cottage) in High Hurstwood.

When she was 26 years old Julia married 26-year-old John Norman at the Parish Church of St Bartholomew in Maresfield, Sussex on 7 December 1869. They were both then living at Maresfield and John was working as a groom. John was the son of James and Sarah Ann Norman; he had been born at Maresfield and his birth registered during the 1st quarter of 1843. He was baptised at the Parish Church of St Bartholomew in Maresfield on 12 November 1843. In the census of 2 April 1871 John and Julia were living at Maresfield with their son and Julia's widowed mother, and John was working as a journeyman gardener at a nursery.

Julia was residing in Buxted Parish when she died there at the age of 30, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Bartholomew at Maresfield on 27 February 1873. Four years later John was living at Maresfield when he died there at the age of 34 (not 33 as given on his burial record), and was buried in the Churchyard of St Bartholomew at Maresfield on 13 July 1877.

 

George and Annís eighth child was George Duvall who was born at Up Marden near Chichester, Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Michael in Up Marden on 9 June 1844. In the census of 30 March 1851 George, at the age of 6, was going to school and living with his parents at North End in Donnington near Chichester. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 George, now aged 16, was working as a farm labourer and living with his parents in one half of Snatts (now Shadwell Cottage) in High Hurstwood.

When he was 21 years old George married 21-year-old Leah Midmore at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield, Sussex on 20 August 1865. George was then a gardener living at Brighton and Leah was a servant living at Rotherfield. Leah was the daughter of Levi and Phoebe Midmore, she had been born at Park Corner in Rotherfield on 21 August 1843 and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys on 8 October 1843.

In the census of 2 April 1871 George and Leah with their two children were living in the Rotherfield Parish part of Crowborough and George was working as a jobbing gardener. They then moved to Withyham Parish where George died at the age of 31 and was buried in the Churchyard of St Michael & All Angels at Withyham on 26 May 1875. In the census of 3 April 1881 Leah was living with her parents at Park Corner in Rotherfield; her daughter had died in 1873 and her son was living with some of her relatives in London.

 

George and Annís ninth child was Emma Duvall who was born at Donnington near Chichester, Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St George in Donnington on 19 July 1846. In the census of 30 March 1851 Emma, at the age of 4, was living with her parents at North End in Donnington near Chichester. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Emma, now aged 14, was living with her parents in one half of Snatts (now Shadwell Cottage) in High Hurstwood. In the census of 2 April 1871 Emma, at the age of 24 and recorded as Emily, was a live-in ladyís maid for the family of Francis and Maria Hamilton at 69 Queens Gate, Kensington, London.

 

George and Annís tenth child was John Henry Duvall who was born at Donnington near Chichester, Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St George in Donnington on 4 February 1849. In the census of 30 March 1851 John, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at North End in Donnington near Chichester. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 John, now aged 12, was going to school and living with his parents in one half of Snatts (now Shadwell Cottage) in High Hurstwood. In the census of 2 April 1871 John, at the age of 22, was staying with the family of his sister Elizabeth Ladhams in Foundry Lane, Millbrook, Hampshire. He was working as a labourer, probably for Elizabethís husband Benjamin Ladhams.

When he was 27 years old John married Henrietta Eader in Portsea Island registration district in Hampshire during the 3rd quarter of 1876. They initially lived at Rotherfield in Sussex where they had two children. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at 36 Daniel Road in Portsea, Hampshire with their two children and John was working as a labourer in the dockyard.

 

 

George and Maryís second child was Charlotte Sophia Frances Duvall who was born in Buxted Parish in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 20 October 1792. When she was 34 years old Charlotte married 24-year-old Henry Tippin at the Parish Church of St Nicholas in Brighton, Sussex on 29 July 1827. Henry was the son of William and Mary Tippin; he had been born at Ringmer in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Mary the Virgin in Ringmer on 8 May 1803.

Henry and Charlotte lived in the Parish of St Thomas ŗ Becket in Lewes, Sussex where they had three children, all daughters, born in 1829, 1832 and 1835. Their middle daughter died in 1840 and in the census of 6 June 1841 they were living in South Street in the Parish of St Thomas ŗ Becket in Lewes with their eldest daughter and James was a warehouseman. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Henry and his two surviving daughter were living in South Street in Lewes and Henry was a corn merchantís porter. Charlotte was away in this census visiting the family of her brother John Duvall, who had died 20 days earlier, at the Mill House in High Hurstwood. Charlotte died at Lewes, at the age of 67, her death being registered in during the 1st quarter of 1860.

Henry, at the age of 57, then married Caroline Page in Lewes registration district during the 1st quarter of 1861. In the census of 7 April 1861 Henry and Caroline were living in the High Street in the Parish of St Thomas ŗ Becket in Lewes and Henry was a corn merchantís warehouseman. The following year Henry died at the age of 59, his death being registered in Lewes registration district during the 4th quarter of 1862. In the censuses of 2 April 1871 and 3 April 1881 Caroline was living with the family of her widowed daughter Emily Burgess at Abinger Place in the Parish of St John sub Castro in Lewes. Caroline died at Lewes at the age of 81, her death being registered during the 3rd quarter of 1889.

 

George and Maryís third child was Mary Duvall who was born in Buxted Parish in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 7 October 1798. When she was 21 years old Mary married 31-year-old James Beard at the Parish Church of St Michael & All Angels in Withyham, Sussex on 27 December 1819. James was the son of John and Ann Beard; he had been born at Cowden in Kent and baptised at the Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene in Cowden on 26 October 1788.

James and Mary lived in Withyham Parish where they had seven children born between 1820 and 1837. In the census of 6 June 1841 they were living at Fords Field in the St Johns area of Withyham Parish (now part of Crowborough) with their four youngest children and James was working as a labourer. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 they were continuing to live at Fords Field, now with just two of their children, and James was a farm worker. In the census of 7 April 1861 they were still living at Fords Field with their newly married daughter Mary and her husband Samuel Hoath, and James was still working as a farm labourer. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 they were still living at Fords Field; James, at the age of 82, was a labourer and they had a 19-year-old grandson living with them.

They were living in the Crowborough area of Withyham Parish, probably still at Fords Field, when James died at the age of 83 (not 87 as given on his burial record) and was buried in the Churchyard of St Michael & All Angels at Withyham on 3 December 1871, and nine years later when Mary died at the age of 81 and was buried in the Churchyard of St Michael & All Angels at Withyham on 29 August 1880.

 

George and Maryís fourth child was John Duvall who was born at Withyham in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Michael & All Angels in Withyham on 6 October 1804.

When he was 19 years old years old and living at Maresfield John married 24-year-old Jane Kenward at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 29 November 1823. Jane was the daughter of William and Anne Kenward; she had been born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 21 June 1799. She'd had an illegitimate daughter in 1821 that was probably living with her mother at Old Hall Farm in High Hurstwood. John and Jane had one child, a son, born in Buxted Parish in April 1824. Jane then died, at the age of 24 (not 26 as given on her burial record), probably as a result of giving birth to this child that was baptised a month after Jane's death, and Jane was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 9 March 1824. At the baptism of his child from this marriage John was described as a miller and it is thought that he was then a journeyman miller in Buxted Parish and before that at his marriage he had been a journeyman miller at Maresfield.

The following year when the banns for his second marriage were announced at St Margaret the Queen Church in Buxted on 24 & 31 July and 7 August 1825, John was living at Withyham, probably with his parents who were looking after his young son. And John, at the age of about 21, then married 27-year-old Elizabeth Uridge, who was living in Buxted Parish, at the Parish Church of St Nicholas in Brighton on 19 August 1825. Elizabeth was the daughter of Richard Uridge, who had been born at High Hurstwood, and his wife Ann; she was born at Nutfield in Surrey and baptised at the Parish Church of St Peter & St Paul in Nutfield on 13 May 1798.

John and Elizabeth had three children, all sons, the first born at Fletching in late 1825 about 4 months after their marriage, and the other two were born in Buxted Parish in 1827 and 1829. Elizabeth then died at the age of 32 and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 29 May 1830. At the baptisms of all three of his children from this marriage John was described as a miller and it is thought that he had been a journeyman miller at Fletching in 1825 and then probably a master miller at Mill Farm in High Hurstwood, Buxted Parish in 1827 and 1829, though it is possible that he was still a journeyman miller at this time and only became the master miller at Mill Farm later.

Three years after Elizabethís death John, at the age of 28, married 38-year-old widow Phoebe Card, whose maiden name was Hammond, at the Parish Church of All Saints in Lewes on 21 May 1833. Phoebe was the daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Hammond; she had been born at Buxted and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 27 January 1795 when her name was recorded as Philly. John and Phoebe didnít have any children.

The 11 January 1836 edition of The Sussex Advertiser carried a notice about the sale of the Barcombe Estate belonging to John Holroyd by auction at the Star Inn in Lewes on 26 January 1836. One of the properties that was part of the estate was Hurstwood Farm in Buxted Parish. Described as an improvable freehold estate, with a newly erected stone built farm house, barn, stable, cattle shed, wagon lodge, etc. and sundry enclosures of land, containing 33 acres, 2 roods, 0 perches. About 22 acres being wood and plantations in hand, the remainder arable, meadow and hop, now let to Mr John Duvall a yearly tenant. There is an extensive right of commonage over Ashdown Forest attached to this property. The Balcombe Estate including Hurstwood Farm had been for sale by auction since 1834 but was presumably not selling as the 1830s were a time of depression in farming. These earlier adverts were not so detailed and didnít specify who was the tenant of Hurstwood Farm.

On the Buxted Tithe Map and Apportionments of 1840 John Duvall was recorded as occupying the Mill Farm in High Hurstwood that was owned by Henry Woodward. This consisted of plots 1740 to 1756 on the Tithe Map with a total area of†56 acres, 3 roods, 3 perches on which the yearly tithe charge was to be £8 13s. The Tithe Map also recorded that John Duvall was occupying Old Harrys Farm (another name for Hurstwood Farm) at High Hurstwood that was owned by John Holroyd. This consisted of plots 652 to 657 with a total area of 13 acres, 0 roods, 15 perches on which the yearly tithe charge was to be £2. The adjacent wood and plantation, plot 658 of 17 acres, 1 rood, 27 perches was owned and occupied by John Holroyd. And the Tithe Map also recorded that John Duvall was occupying Cocks Brook Land (that became Coxbrook when a cottage was later built there) at High Hurstwood that was owned by Thomas Wace. This consisted of plots 1778 to 1780 with a total area of†8 acres, 3 roods, 36 perches on which the yearly tithe charge was to be £1 10s 6d.

In the census of 6 June 1841 John and Phoebe were living in the Mill House at High Hurstwood with Johnís four sons, and John gave his occupation as being a miller. Living with them were 27-year-old journeyman miller James Muddle; 20-year-old male servant John Beard; 20-year-old female servant Caroline Buvey; and Phoebeís widowed mother Elizabeth Hammond.

The 17 May 1842 edition of The Sussex Advertiser reported that Cooper Smith had feloniously broken into the house of John Duvall in Buxted Parish, at half past nine oíclock, on the night of 15 may 1842 and the following day was committed to the House of Correction to await trial. Then the 24 May 1842 edition of The Sussex Advertiser in its report on the adjourned Easter Quarter Sessions at Lewes on 19 May 1842 recorded that Cooper Smith, a 15-year-old labourer, pleaded guilty to having broken into the house of John Duvall and stealing a money pot; and was sentenced to three monthsí hard labour.

On 25 May 1844 John Duvall and his neighbour John Colbran were two of the witnesses to the will of their friend Henry Watson, who was the farmer at Greenhurst Farm in High Hurstwood. They were also both appointed executors of the will together with Henry's wife, but as John Duvall died before Henry Watson this was a duty John never had to carry out.[2]

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 19 June 1844 it was recorded that on 20 March 1844 miller John Duvall had given a mortgage of £100 at 5% interest to James Pratt and his wife Hope on their property called Snatts that consisted of a cottage or tenement, garden and half an acre of land that paid the Lord of the Manor 2d yearly, with land of 1 acre 10 perches that paid the Lord of the Manor 4Ĺd yearly. Both were late Wilmshurst's, before Tompsett's and before Alchorne's and situated at Hayerst Wood with a newly erected cottage in two dwellings and other buildings since erected on the premises.[3] These premises were plots 1380 to 1385 on the Buxted Parish Tithe Map that are now Shadwell Cottage, Church Cottage and a small cottage that no longer exists and stood just behind where Meadow Cottage now stands.

Then at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 16 June 1847 it was recorded that on 17 April 1847 miller John Duvall had given a further mortgage of £50 at 5% interest to James Pratt and his wife Hope on their property called Snatts.[4] The wording of both mortgages indicate that Hope Pratt and not her husband was the customary tenant and actual owner of Snatts. Hope Pratt was the half-sister of John Duvall's second wife, Elizabeth Uridge, and had inherited this property on the death of her father, William Wilmshurst, in 1820.

Johnís youngest son, William, died during July 1847, at the age of 18, while presumably still living at the Mill House, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted. Then Johnís son Henry married Elizabeth Olive in December 1847 and went to live at Parkhurst in High Hurstwood though he continued to work for his father. John eldest son, George, had become a journeyman miller and by 1851 had left Mill Farm and was living and working at Fletching. Thus leaving just one of Johnís sons, John junior, living with his father and stepmother in the Mill House.

The 9 May 1848 edition of The Sussex Advertiser carried a notice about the sale by auction under order of the High Court of Chancery in the case of ĎHolroyd v Wyattí at the Star Inn in Lewes on 16 May 1848 of a number of properties, one was Hayerst Farm in the parish of Buxted, with a stone built farm house, barn, stable, cattle sheds and upwards of 11 acres of meadow and arable land, let to John Duvall at £22 per annum, and upwards of 22 acres of woodland and plantation in hand. This was the property that had been for sale since 1834 and of which John Duvall had definitely been the tenant since 1836.

Thomas Wace, the owner of Cocks Brook Land, recorded in his will made on 23 February 1849 that John Duvall was then still the occupier of this land.[5]

From the above newspaper reports, Tithe Map, and census information it seems that John Duvall leased Mill Farm and its mill and lived there. He also leased Hurstwood Farm (also known as Hayerst Farm or Old Harrys Farm) which he presumably farmed together with Mill Farm, but he didnít live there, presumably renting out the farm house for another family to live in. The quoted acreages also seem to indicate that he had the use of the woodland adjacent to Hurstwood Farm. He also leased Cocks Brook Land that he would have also farmed, giving him a total acreage of nearly 80 acres.

On 8 February 1849 it was recorded in the Court Book of the Manor of Framfield that on that day James and Hope Pratt sold their copyhold property called Snatts to miller John Duvall for the two outstanding mortgages of £100 and £50 and a further sum of £50, making a total of £200, and John Duvall was admitted to this property on payment of reliefs and fines of 3s 3d to the Lord of the Manor.[6] Later that year, on 5 November 1849, John Duvall was one of the witnesses to the will of his neighbour Nicholas Dadswell, who lived at Old Hall just across the road from Mill Farm.

The 1851 edition of the Post Office Directory of Sussex lists John Duvall as a farmer and miller in Buxted Parish, but hardly before this directory was published John died on 10 March 1851, at the age of 46, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 15 March 1851. Then two weeks later in the census of 30 March 1851 widow Phoebe Duvall was living in the Mill House at High Hurstwood and gave her occupation as a miller employing 6 men, having taken over her husbandís business after his death. Those living with her were her stepson John Duvall, who was a miller employed at home; her 82-year-old mother Elizabeth Hammond; her 90-year-old father-in-law George Duvall; her late husbandís sister Charlotte Tippin, who was visiting from Lewes; and four servants. The servants were 20-year-old house servant Ann Holmwood; 20-year-old farm labourer Thomas Pilbeam; 18-year-old farm labourer Charles Curer; and 12-year-old carter boy James Parker. Another of the men Phoebe would have been employing was her stepson Henry Duvall, who was then living at Parkhurst in High Hurstwood and describing himself as a master miller.

John had made his will on 9 May 1850 and probate of his will was granted to his wife Phoebe and his son John, the two executors, by the Deanery of South Malling on 10 June 1851 when his personal estate was valued at under £1000. In his will John left his copyhold property called Snatts in High Hurstwood that consisted of two double cottages and about two acres of land to his three sons, John, Henry and George as Tenants in Common. And he charged these properties with paying his wife an annuity of £12 a year. His wife was also to received half his household effects and his son John was to have £10 for his trouble as executor. The remainder of his personal estate was to be divided equally between his three sons.[7]

It seems that John had been a very successful farmer and miller because a personal estate of £1000 was a considerable sum and he had also made enough money to give mortgages and purchase property. His sons John and Henry were not to share his success when they tried to carry on his business at Mill Farm.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 25 June 1851 the death of John Duvall, who held the copyhold property called Snatts was recorded and for a Heriot (tax on transfer of ownership of manorial property) a horse valued at £14 was seized for the Lord of the Manor.[8] Then at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 22 June 1853 Johnís three sons were admitted to his copyhold property called Snatts.

Two years after Johnís death Phoebe, at the age of 58, married 73-year-old widower William Brissenden, who was a farmer at Pigs Foot Farm in Hadlow Down, at the Parish Church of St Mark in Hadlow Down in Sussex on 31 August 1853 by licence. William was the son of Thomas and Anne Brissenden, he had been born at Mayfield in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Dunstan in Mayfield on 14 May 1780. Phoebe lived with William at Pigs Foot Farm in Hadlow Down and her mother, Elizabeth Hammond, also moved with her from Mill Farm to Pigs Foot Farm where she died at the age of 88, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 11 November 1856. Then just over a year later William died at Hadlow Down, at the age of 77, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Mark at Hadlow Down on 16 January 1858. In the census of 7 April 1861 Phoebe was living with the family of her late husbandís son Thomas Brissenden at Witherenden Mill in Stonegate, Sussex. But Phoebe was back living at Hadlow Down when she died at the age of 73 (not 77 as given on her burial record), and was buried in the Churchyard of St Mark at Hadlow Down on 1 June 1868.

 

 

John and Janeís only child was George Duvall who was born in Buxted Parish in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 18 April 1824. In the census of 6 June 1841 George, at the age of 17, was living with his father and stepmother at the Mill House in High Hurstwood. By 1851 George had left home at the Mill House and in the census of 30 March 1851 he was a journeyman miller working as a grinder for miller Rebecca Diplock with whom he was living at the Mill House in Fletching, Sussex. He would have then been 27-years-old but seemed uncertain of his age because it was first entered on the census form as 24 and then changed to 28, this being the start of him being recorded generally with an age about six years younger than he actually was.

When his father died in 1851 George and his two brothers, John and Henry, inherited equal shares in their fatherís copyhold property called Snatts in High Hurstwood that consisted of two double cottages and about two acres of land. George and his two brotherís also inherited equal share in the residue of their fatherís personal estate. At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 22 June 1853 George and his two brotherís produced a copy of their fatherís will and were admitted to his copyhold property called Snatts on payment of reliefs and fines of 9s 9d to the Lord of the Manor. Then on 10 June 1856 it was recorded in the Court Book of the Manor of Framfield that George and his brother John had sold their two shares of Snatts to their brother Henry for £50 each. For a Heriot to the Lord of the Manor an old horse valued at £3 was seized.

In the census of 7 April 1861 George, at the age of 37 (though recorded as 32), was lodging with the family of farm labourer James Weeding at Bolebrook Mill in Hartfield, Sussex; he was unmarried and working as a miller.

When he was 45 years old George married 28-year-old Emma Brown at the Parish Church of St Clement Danes in Westminster on 26 December 1869. George, who gave his age as 40, was then a labourer living at Hartwell in Hartfield, Sussex and Emma was living at 42 Essex Street in Westminster. Emma was the daughter of James and Ann Brown; she had been born at Cambridge during the 4th quarter of 1841 and baptised at St Mary-the-Less Church in Cambridge on 16 January 1842.

In the census of 2 April 1871 George and Emma were living at Hartwell in Hartfield, Sussex where George was the farm bailiff. Then when their only child, Charles Samuel Duvall, was born in early 1874 they were living at East Grinstead in Sussex. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living with their son at Shepards Corner in Charlwood, Surrey and George was working as a labourer in a nursery. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 they were living with their son at Brook Side in Charlwood and George was continuing to work as a labourer in a nursery. In the census of 31 March 1901 George and Emma were living in Lowfield Heath Road in Charlwood and George was now a retired non-domestic gardener.

George died when he was 81 years old (not 75 as given on his death certificate), his death being registered in Reigate registration district, which includes Charlwood, during the 4th quarter of 1905. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Emma was living with her son and his wife at 5 Radnor Park Road in Folkestone, Kent. Sixteen years after her husbandís death Emma died at the age of 80, her death being registered in Elham registration district, which includes Folkestone, during the 1st quarter of 1922.

 

John and Elizabethís eldest child (Johnís second) was Henry Duvall who was born at Fletching in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Cross in Uckfield on 25 December 1825. In the census of 6 June 1841 Henry, at the age of 15, was living with his father and stepmother at the Mill House in High Hurstwood.

When he was 22 years old Henry married 17-year-old Elizabeth Olive at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 31 December 1847. Elizabeth was the daughter of John and Elizabeth Olive, she had been born at Buxted and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 24 October 1830. Henry and Elizabeth didnít have any children. In the census of 30 March 1851 Henry and Elizabeth were living at Parkhurst in High Hurstwood. Living with them was a cousin, 67-year-old widowed and retired farmer Joseph Waghorne, and their general servant 15-year-old Caroline Holmwood. Henry described himself as a master miller, who was not employing anyone; he would have been working for his father until his death two weeks before the census and was then working for his mother.

When his father died in 1851 Henry and his two brothers, John and George, inherited equal shares in their fatherís copyhold property called Snatts in High Hurstwood that consisted of two double cottages and about two acres of land. Henry and his two brotherís also inherited equal share in the residue of their fatherís personal estate. At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 22 June 1853 Henry and his two brotherís produced a copy of their fatherís will and were admitted to his copyhold property called Snatts on payment of 9s 9d to the Lord of the Manor.[9]

It seems that soon after their fatherís death Henry and his brother John set themselves up as a partnership to operate Mill Farm and its mill, because the 26 December 1854 edition of The Sussex Advertiser carried a notice from them that their partnership had been dissolved by mutual consent and that all creditors and debtors of the firm should settle their accounts. So when the 1855 edition of the Post Office Directory of Sussex listed John & Henry Duvall as farmers and millers in Buxted Parish this was either an out-of-date entry or it was indicating a more informal way of working together.

On 10 June 1856 it was recorded in the Court Book of the Manor of Framfield that John and George Duvall had sold their two shares of Snatts to their brother Henry for £50 each. For a Heriot to the Lord of the Manor an old horse valued at £3 was seized, and Henry was admitted on payment of reliefs and fines of 3s 3d to the Lord of the Manor. Then at the same court it was recorded that Henry Duvall and his wife Elizabeth then mortgaged Snatts to William Kenward, miller of Uckfield, John Mannington, butcher of Uckfield, and John Newnham, timber merchant of Uckfield, the trustees of the Uckfield Permanent Benefit Building Society, by an indenture dated 10 June 1856.[10] Eighteen months later, on 29 December 1857, it was recorded in the Court Book of the Manor of Framfield that Henry Duvall and his wife Elizabeth sold Snatts for £280 to farmer John Parris of Chillies Farm. There was no Heriot as Henry Duvall had no living beast, and John Parris was admitted on payment of reliefs and fines of 3s 3d to the Lord of the Manor.[11] And at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 30 June 1858 it was recorded that the trustees of the Uckfield Permanent Benefit Building Society in a writing dated 29 December 1857 acknowledge satisfaction that the principal and interest on the mortgage to Henry Duvall had been paid in full.[12]

It was probably around the time his partnership with his brother John was terminated in late 1855 that Henry moved to Carrots Farm in High Hurstwood and started farming there. But there must have been some continuing working relationship between Henry and his brother John because they both declare themselves bankrupt on the same day. The 10 November 1857 edition of The Sussex Advertiser carried almost identical notices from each of them that by indentures dated 29 October 1857 they had assigned all their personal estates in trust to farmer John Parris of Chillies Farm and miller William Kenward of Uckfield for the equal benefit of all their creditors. The 8 December 1857 edition of The Sussex Advertiser then carried a notice that on 10 December 1857 there would be a sale by auction at High Hurstwood Mill of farming equipment, live and dead stock, and household furniture by the direction of the assignees of Messrs Duvall. This was followed by a notice in the 16 February 1858 edition of The Sussex Advertiser that on 24 February 1858 there would be a sale by auction at Carrots Farm of the farming equipment and livestock of Henry Duvall of Carrots Farm. The list of items at this sale seems to indicate that it included some unsold items from the earlier sale at High Hurstwood Mill. Then the 13 April 1858 edition of The Sussex Advertiser carried notices from both the brothers to their debtors; Henryís notice stated that his debtors would be paid their respective debts in full, and Johnís notice stated that his debtors would be paid ten shillings in the pound of their respective debts.

After he became bankrupt Henry and Elizabeth would have had to leave Carrots Farm and in the census of 7 April 1861 they were living in the southern section of Maypole Farm House and Henry described himself as a proprietor of houses. Three years later Elizabeth died, at the age of 33, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 6 February 1864.

The 4 October 1864 edition of The Sussex Advertiser carried a notice that Henry Duvall, formerly residing near Buxted Bridge and late of New House in Buxted, was petitioning the County Court in Lewes to have his bankruptcy annulled at a hearing on 25 October 1864 on the grounds that his debts and liabilities had been paid in full, and any creditor wishing to oppose the application was to attend. Then the 26 November 1864 edition of The Sussex Advertiser reported that at the County Court on 22 November 1864 the liabilities of Henry Duvall, who was residing at Framfield, were set down at £13 11s 3d and the case was adjourned until the next court sitting.

In the census of 2 April 1871 Henry was an annuitant boarding with the family of farmer Edward Gaston at Framfield in Sussex. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Henry was a retired miller living with the family of his brother Johnís son William at the grocerís shop in Five Ash Down in Buxted Parish. In the census of 5 April 1891 Henry was continuing to live with the family of his nephew William Duvall at the grocerís shop in Five Ash Down where he was living on his own means. Henry was still living at Five Ash Down when he died at the age of 71, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 8 June 1897.

 

John and Elizabethís second child (Johnís third) was John Duvall who was born in Buxted Parish in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 3 June 1827. In the census of 6 June 1841 John, at the age of 14, was living with his father and stepmother at the Mill House in High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 John, now aged 24, was living with his recently widowed stepmother at the Mill House in High Hurstwood and he was working for her as a miller. Also living there was his grandfather George Duvall and his step-grandmother Elizabeth Hammond.

When his father died in 1851 John and his mother were the executors of his will and John was left £10 to pay for his trouble as an executor. John and his two brothers, George and Henry, inherited equal shares in their fatherís copyhold property called Snatts in High Hurstwood that consisted of two double cottages and about two acres of land. John and his two brotherís also inherited equal share in the residue of their fatherís personal estate.

When he was 25 years old John married 23-year-old Charlotte Winter at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 6 November 1852. Charlotte was the daughter of James and Louisa Winter; she had been born at Buxted and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 4 January 1829.

John and Charlotte lived at the Mill House in High Hurstwood with assorted members of Johnís family. In 1853 Johnís stepmother married and went to live with her husband at Pigs Foot Farm in Hadlow Down, Sussex, and her mother, Elizabeth Hammond, went with her. Then in late 1855 John and Charlotteís only child, a son, was born. Itís assumed that Johnís grandfather, George Duvall, continued to live with John and Charlotte at the Mill House until his death, at the age of 96, and burial in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 24 November 1856.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 22 June 1853 John and his two brothers produced a copy of their father's will and were admitted to his copyhold property called Snatts on payment of 9s 9d to the Lord of the Manor. Then on 10 June 1856 it was recorded in the Court Book of the Manor of Framfield that John and his brother George had sold their two shares of Snatts to their brother Henry for £50 each. For a Heriot to the Lord of the Manor an old horse valued at £3 was seized.

It seems that soon after their fatherís death John and his brother Henry set themselves up as a partnership to operate Mill Farm and its mill, because the 26 December 1854 edition of The Sussex Advertiser carried a notice from them that their partnership had been dissolved by mutual consent and that all creditors and debtors of the firm should settle their accounts. So when the 1855 edition of the Post Office Directory of Sussex listed John & Henry Duvall as farmers and millers in Buxted Parish this was either an out-of-date entry or it was indicating a more informal way of working together.

On 22 February 1856 John Duvall was one of the witnesses to the will of fellow High Hurstwood resident Richard Booker.

It was probably around the time their partnership was terminated that Johnís brother Henry moved to Carrots Farm in High Hurstwood and started farming there while John remained at Mill Farm. But there must have been some continuing working relationship between John and his brother Henry because they both declare themselves bankrupt on the same day. The 10 November 1857 edition of The Sussex Advertiser carried almost identical notices from each of them that by indentures dated 29 October 1857 they had assigned all their personal estates in trust to farmer John Parris of Chillies Farm and miller William Kenward of Uckfield for the equal benefit of all their creditors. The 8 December 1857 edition of The Sussex Advertiser then carried a notice that on 10 December 1857 there would be a sale by auction at High Hurstwood Mill of farming equipment, live and dead stock, and household furniture by the direction of the assignees of Messrs Duvall. This was followed by a notice in the 16 February 1858 edition of The Sussex Advertiser that on 24 February 1858 there would be a sale by auction at Carrots Farm of the farming equipment and livestock of Henry Duvall of Carrots Farm. The list of items at this sale seems to indicate that it included some unsold items from the earlier sale at High Hurstwood Mill. †Then the 13 April 1858 edition of The Sussex Advertiser carried notices from both the brothers to their debtors; Johnís notice stated that his debtors would be paid ten shillings in the pound of their respective debts, and Henryís notice stated that his debtors would be paid their respective debts in full.

After he became bankrupt John and his family would have had to leave Mill Farm where all their furniture and means of livelihood had been sold, and in the census of 7 April 1861 John and Charlotte and their son were living with farmer Roth Bayntun at Woodfield Farm in Clayton, Sussex, where John was working as a farm labourer and Charlotte as a general servant; they had effectively become live-in servants. Then when John gave evidence to Lewes Probate Registry on 18 November 1865 that he and James Dadswell had witnessed the will of Richard Booker in his presence, John described himself as a farm bailiff of Clayton. It was soon after this that they moved back to High Hurstwood as the 1866 and 1867 editions of the Post Office Directory of Sussex both list John Duvall as the publican at the Crow & Gate public house. The previous publican at the Crow & Gate had been Charlotteís father James Winter who had died in December 1865. In the census of 2 April 1871 John and Charlotte were living at the Crow & Gate public house with their son, and John was the publican. They had 18-year-old Ann Brown as a live-in general domestic servant and three lodgers. The 8 February 1871 edition of the Police Gazette reported that a shawl, the property of John Duvall, had been stolen from the Crow & Gate public house on the 27 January 1871, and gives a good description of the type of person that lodged at the pub; in this case a navvy and two tramps. The 1874 edition of the Post Office Directory of Sussex again listed John Duvall as the publican at the Crow & Gate public house.

John and Charlotte probably left the Crow & Gate public house when the licence was transferred to Henry Hoath at Uckfield Petty Sessions on 1 August 1878, and the 1878 edition of the Post Office Directory of Sussex listed John Duvall as a beer retailer at Five Ash Down. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 John and Charlotte were living at the beer shop in Five Ash Down (later known as the Pig & Butcher) where John was the publican. They had 18-year-old Emily Woodgate as a live-in domestic servant, and two lodgers. Their son, who had married in 1879 was living in the grocerís shop next-door with his wife and son and Johnís brother Henry. The 1882 and 1890 editions of Kellyís Directory of Sussex both listed John Duvall as a beer retailer at Five Ash Down. In the census of 5 April 1891 John and Charlotte were continuing to live at the Pig & Butcher where John was the publican. They had 18-year-old Harriet Gorringe as a live-in domestic servant, and nine lodgers. Their son and his family was still living in the grocerís shop next-door. The 1891 edition of Kellyís Directory of Sussex listed John Duvall as a beer retailer at Five Ash Down.

The Friday 29 September 1893 edition of the Sussex Agricultural Express reported on the case before Uckfield Magistrates on Thursday of Albert Fleet who was charged with being drunk and refusing to quit the Pig & Butcher beerhouse on the 13th. As it was Charlotte who had served him and had to call the police, she gave evidence for the prosecution, which was corroborated by her servant Mary Ann Winter, who was presumably a relative of Charlotte. Albert Fleet was fined 5s, including costs.

John was still the publican at the Pig & Butcher in Five Ash Down when he died on 20 January 1895, at the age of 67, after a long and somewhat painful illness He was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 24 January 1895. His death was reported in the 2 February 1895 edition of The Sussex Agricultural Express where he was described as one of the old and much-respected inhabitants of Buxted Parish.

After Johnís death Charlotte took over as publican at the Pig & Butcher and it is thought that her son William came to live with her after his separation from his wife and loss of his home and grocerís shop in 1897/8. Charlotte remained at the Pig & Butcher until just before her death, which happened when she was living at Hempstead in Framfield when she was 71 years old. She was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 22 December 1899.

 

 

John and Charlotteís only child was William Duvall who was born at the Mill House in High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex on 22 August 1855. His birth was reported in the 28 August 1855 edition of The Sussex Advertiser. In the census of 7 April 1861 William, at the age of 5, was living with his parents in the home of farmer Roth Bayntun at Woodfield Farm in Clayton, Sussex. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 William, now aged 15, was living with his parents at the Crow & Gate pub in High Hurstwood. In 1878 he moved to Five Ash Down, at the same time as his parents, and took the house and grocerís shop next to Pig & Butcher beer shop that his parents had moved into. The 1878 edition of the Post Office Directory listed William Duvall as a grocer at Five Ash Down.

William was a 23 years old grocer when he married 24-year-old Emily Marten at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 10 June 1879. Emily was the daughter of Joseph and Lucy Marten; she had been born at High Hurstwood and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 8 April 1855. She was also the sister of the William Marten who was the publican at the Maypole Inn at High Hurstwood.

William and Emily had seven children, who were all sons. Their first son was born in 1880, and in the census of 3 April 1881 they were living with their son at the grocerís shop in Five Ash Down, next-door to the public house where Williamís father was publican, and William was a master grocer. Living with them were Williamís uncle Henry Duvall, Emilyís sister Eliza Marten and 18-year-old grocerís assistant James Saunders. William and Emilyís next two sons were born in late 1881 and late 1883, and the 1882 edition of Kellyís Directory of Sussex continued to list William Duvall as a grocer at Five Ash Down.

It was recorded in the Court Book of the Manor of Framfield that on 14 October 1884 Sarah Minns and her son Benjamin John Minns with his wife Fanny, came before the Steward of the Manor and sold the copyhold part of Newlands Farm with the Royal Oak public house at High Hurstwood to William Duvall, a grocer of Five Ash Down, for £1000. For a Heriot a cow valued at £7 was seized for the Lord of the Manor, and William Duvall was admitted as tenant of these premises on payment of reliefs and fines of £1 3s 3d to the Lord of the Manor.[13] An indenture, also dated 14 October 1884, recorded that Sarah Minns and Benjamin John Minns sold the freehold part of Newlands Farm to William Duvall for £50.[14] William's tenants at Newlands Farm and the Royal Oak public house were Henry Hoath and his wife Jemima.

William and Emilyís next three sons were born in 1886, 1888 and 1890, and the 1890 edition of Kellyís Directory of Sussex again listed William Duvall as a grocer at Five Ash Down. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living with their six sons at the grocerís shop in Five Ash Down, William was still a master grocer and his parents were still living in the public house next-door. They still had Williamís uncle Henry Duvall living with them and their live-in general servant was 14-year-old Fanny Muddle. The 1891 edition of Kellyís Directory of Sussex listed William Duvall as a grocer at Five Ash Down, and their last son was born in late 1892.

Ten years after purchasing Newlands Farm William Duvall mortgaged it, both the freehold and copyhold parts, to Phillis Venus on 19 March 1895 for £600 at 5% interest.[15]

It was in 1897/8 that William and Emily separated and also gave up the grocerís shop in Five Ash Down. William went to live with his widowed mother at the Pig & Butcher in Five Ash Down and Emily and the children went to live at Britts Farm in Buxted. It seems that William may have had a drink problem as the 29 October 1898 edition of the Sussex Agricultural Express reported that the Uckfield Magistrates fined farmer William Duvall 10s with 7s costs for being drunk and disorderly at Uckfield on 17 October 1898.

The following month William sold the licensed premises called the Royal Oak with the Dairy and Poultry farm called Newlands Farm in an auction by agents St John Smith at the White Hart Hotel in Lewes on 6 December 1898. Then a month later, on 3 January 1899, William used the proceeds of this sale to pay off the mortgage of £600 that he had taken out on Newlands Farm just under four years earlier.

Williamís mother died in late 1899 resulting in William losing his home at the Pig & Butcher and he first entered Uckfield Union Workhouse on 25 March 1900. In the census of 31 March 1901 William was an inmate of Uckfield Union Workhouse and described as a grocer and annuitant. Emily and six of her sons were living at Britts Farm in Buxted where Emily was living on her own means and had her uncle, Henry Feldwick, living with her. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Emily and three of her sons were living a Britts in Buxted where Emily was living on her private means. William was still an inmate of Uckfield Union Workhouse and described as formerly a grocer, though records of the number of days William was in the workhouse during each half year show that he was not always resident in the Workhouse, and itís thought that he may have done casual farm work as a live-in labourer or at times lived as a tramp.

Itís thought to be William that the 17 March 1922 edition of The Sussex Express reported as the William Duvall, of no fixed abode, who was before the Uckfield Police Court on 18 March 1922 charged with stealing a bushel of potatoes from a field of George Cottingham at Reading Farm in Maresfield. William was found guilty but was dealt with leniently, being sentenced to one dayís imprisonment.

William died at High View House in Uckfield, the Council run care home that had been the Uckfield Union Workhouse, on 25 June 1922, at the age of 66, from cerebral apoplexy (a stroke) and he was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 30 June 1922. Ten years later Emily was still living at Britts in Buxted when she died on 18 January 1932, at the age of 76, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 22 January 1932.

 

 

 

John and Elizabethís third child (Johnís fourth) was William Duvall who was born in Buxted Parish in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 9 August 1829. In the census of 6 June 1841 William, at the age of 11, was living with his father and stepmother at the Mill House in High Hurstwood. William died when he was 18 years old, and he was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 22 July 1847.

 


[1] ERSO: AMS 5923/1 & GRA 28/4 Lease & Enfranchisement.

[2] ESRO: PBT 2/1/13/413 Will of Henry Watson proved by the Deanery of South Malling.

[3] ESRO: ADA 126 pages 322-324, Manor of Framfield Court Book 13.

[4] ESRO: ADA 127 pages 91-93, Manor of Framfield Court Book 14.

[5] TNA: PROB 11/2111, Will of Thomas Wace proved by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury.

[6] ESRO: ADA 127 pages 215-216, Manor of Framfield Court Book 14.

[7] ESRO: PBT 2/1/13/270 Will of John Duvall proved by the Deanery of South Malling.

[8] ESRO: ADA 127 pages 459-460, Manor of Framfield Court Book 14.

[9] ESRO: ADA 128 pages 57-58, Manor of Framfield Court Book 15.

[10] ESRO: ADA 128 pages 211-213, Manor of Framfield Court Book 15.

[11] ESRO: ADA 128 pages 305-306, Manor of Framfield Court Book 15.

[12] ESRO: ADA 128 page 324, Manor of Framfield Court Book 15.

[13] ESRO: ADA 132 pages 349-351, Manor of Framfield Court Book 19.

[14] WSRO: WISTON/781 Indenture for sale of freehold part of Newlands Farm.

[15] WSRO: WISTON/782 Mortgage of freehold & copyhold parts of Newlands Farm, 19 Mar 1895.

 

Copyright © Derek Miller 2014-2016

Last updated 10 May 2016

 

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