HIGH HURSTWOOD

ITS HISTORY from the STONE AGE to the 21st CENTURY

 

ITS BUILDINGS AND LANDS, THE FAMILIES THAT OCCUPIED THEM,

AND THE ACTIVITIES THAT WENT ON THERE

 

Home  General History  General Notes  Person Index  Contact me

 

PROPERTIES  FAMILIES  ORGANIZATIONS  OCCUPATIONS  EVENTS

 

 

The DADSWELL Family
of Lane End Cottages

 

 

David & Mary Ann Dadswellís Family

 

Chart of David & Mary Ann Dadswell's Family

 

David Dadswell was the youngest of the seventeen children of farmer Robert Dadswell and one of the four children that were by Robert's second wife Ann. He was born at Beeches Farm in Crowborough within Rotherfield Parish in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 14 August 1831. In the census of 6 June 1841 David, at the age of 10, was living with his parents at Beeches Farm. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 David, now aged 19, was continuing to live with his parents at Beeches Farm, and he was working for his father on the farm.

When he was 24 years old David married 19-year-old Mary Ann Kenward at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 17 April 1856. Mary Ann was the daughter of Kendrick and Charlotte Kenward; she had been born in Rotherfield Parish and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 16 October 1836.

David and Mary Ann had five children, four daughters and a son. They first lived at Crowborough, probably with Davidís parents, where their eldest child was born 3 weeks after their marriage. They then moved to High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex where they had four children, the first born in 1859. In the census of 7 April 1861 they were living in one of the pair of cottages called Lane End Cottages in Chillies Lane at High Hurstwood with their two children. David, at the age of 30, was described as being a retired farmer and they had 21-year-old Elizabeth Smith as their live-in general servant. Their third child was born in 1861 and died in 1867, at the age of 6. Then their fourth child was born in 1870.

In the census of 2 April 1871 they were living at Lane End Cottages with the two youngest of their surviving children; their eldest child, daughter Emily, was away working in service. David was now described as a farm labourer and was presumably working on one of the local farms. In 1876 their daughter Emily died at the age of 20, and then in 1880 their fifth child was born. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at Lane End Cottages with their three surviving children, and David was continuing to work as a farm labourer. Then in 1882 their fourth child, daughter Ada, died at the age of 12. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at Lane End Cottages with their two surviving children, and David had now become a general labourer. In the census of 31 March 1901 they were continuing to live at Lane End Cottages with their two surviving children and David was continuing to work as a general labourer.

David died at High Hurstwood at the age of 70 (not 72 as given on his burial record), and he was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 1 January 1902. Then just under two years later Mary Ann's only son, Henry, died at the age of 44, and Mary Ann was the sole executrix and beneficiary of his will. Eight years after her husband's death Mary Ann was living at Uckfield in Sussex when she died at the age of 74, and was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 8 November 1910.

 

 

David and Mary Annís eldest child was Emily Ann Dadswell who was born at Crowborough within Rotherfield Parish in Sussex on 7 May 1856, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 3 August 1856. By early 1859 Emily had moved with her parents to High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and in the census of 7 April 1861 Emily, at the age of 4, was living with her parents at Lane End Cottages in High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Emily, now aged 14, was a live-in housemaid to the family of grocer and draper Thomas Avis in Uckfield High Street in Sussex. Emily died at High Hurstwood at the age of 20, and she was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 30 September 1876.

 

David and Mary Annís second child was Henry William Dadswell who was born at High Hurstwood within Buxted Parish in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 6 March 1859. In the census of 7 April 1861 Henry, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at Lane End Cottages in High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Henry, now aged 12, was going to school, this would have been Buxted School, and living with his parents at Lane End Cottages. In the census of 3 April 1881 Henry, at the age of 22, was working as a farm labourer and living with his parents at Lane End Cottages. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Henry, now aged 32, was working as a general labourer and continuing to live with his parents at Lane End Cottages.

When his father's spinster sister, Sarah Dadswell, died in 1895 Henry, who was then a farm labourer, was one of the two executors of her will and after a bequest of £100 to Henry's cousin Thomas Dadswell and a bequest of all her linen, bedding and wearing apparel to Henry's sister Lois, Henry and his sister Lois were to equally share the remainder of Sarah's estate.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 29 December 1897 it was presented that in an indenture of conveyance dated the 28 December 1897 the executors of Amos Smith had sold to Henry Dadswell, a farm labourer of Lane End Cottages, for the purchase price of £120, the property known as Ivy Hole (now called Woodpeckers) at High Hurstwood, described as a copyhold property consisting of a cottage and one rood of new assert land (shown as plot 152 of actually only 26 perches on the 1840 Buxted Tithe Map) that paid a yearly rent of 1d to the Lord of the Manor, and an adjoining piece of freehold land of 8 perches (shown as plot 67 on the 1862 Enclosure Award Map). And Henry was admitted as tenant of this property on payment of a relief and fine of 6d to the Lord of the Manor.

In the census of 31 March 1901 Henry, still single at the age of 41, was continuing to work as a general labourer and still living with his parents at Lane End Cottages. Then the following year while reporting on the case before Uckfield Petty Sessions in which the licensee, Jemima Hoath, of the Royal Oak at High Hurstwood was charge with permitting drunkenness on her premises on the evening of 2 December 1902, the 26 December 1902 edition of The Courier stated that one of the witnesses was Henry Dadswell. So it looks as if Henry liked his drink, and that the Royal Oak, which was about half a mile from his home, was his Ďlocalí.

The 26 September 1903 edition of the Sussex Express carried a notice that Henry Dadswell had instructed St John Smith & Son to sell Ivy Hole by auction at the Maypole Inn on 1 October 1903, and the household furniture and out-door effects would be sold at Ivy Hole immediately afterwards. Ivy Hole was described as a freehold and part copyhold detached cottage with a lean-to carpenter's shop and tool house, and a paved piggery, together with a garden of 38 perches stocked with apple, plum and cherry trees and a spring of good water.

Henry Dadswell owned Ivy Hole for 6 years until just before his death, and at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 2 November 1903 it was recorded that he had sold Ivy Hole for £150 to Thomas Critcher, a gentleman of 16 Pont Street Mews, Chelsea, London.

Henry never married, he died at High Hurstwood on 17 November 1903, at the age of 44, and was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 21 November 1903. Henry was a farm labourer of High Hurstwood when he made his will on 12 December 1902, and probate of this will was granted to his mother Mary Ann Dadswell, the sole executrix, by the Lewes Probate Registry on 4 January 1904, when his personal estate was valued at £117 6s 4d. In his will Henry bequeathed all his real and personal estate to his mother.

 

David and Mary Annís third child was Fanny Dadswell who was born at High Hurstwood within Buxted Parish in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 13 October 1861. Fanny died at High Hurstwood when she was 6 years old, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 22 September 1867.

 

David and Mary Annís fourth child was Ada Margaret Dadswell who was born at High Hurstwood within Buxted Parish in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 30 January 1870. In the census of 2 April 1871 Ada, at the age of 1, was living with her parents at Lane End Cottages in the High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Ada, now aged 11, was going to school, this would have been High Hurstwood School, and living with her parents at Lane End Cottages. The following year Ada died at High Hurstwood, at the age of 12, and was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 30 May 1882.

 

David and Mary Annís fifth child was Lois Dadswell who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 19 February 1880, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 16 May 1880. In the census of 3 April 1881 Lois, at the age of 1, was living with her parents at Lane End Cottages in High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Lois, now aged 11, was going to school, this would have been High Hurstwood School, and living with her parents at Lane End Cottages.

When her father's spinster sister, Sarah Dadswell, died in 1895 Lois inherited all her linen, bedding and wearing apparel and also equally shared with her brother Henry the remainder of Sarah's estate. In the census of 31 March 1901 Lois, at the age of 21, was continuing to live with his parents at Lane End Cottages, she had no recorded occupation but was probably looking after her now aged parents and her bachelor brother Henry.

Lois' brother Henry died at High Hurstwood in 1903 and her mother at Uckfield in 1910. Lois cannot be found in the census of 2 April 1911, but in the National Register of 29 September 1939 Lois, unmarried at the age of 59, was a nurse looking after retired spinsters Christina and Alice Woods at their home, 43 Portland Avenue in Hove, Sussex.

 

Copyright © Derek Miller 2014-2016

Last updated 10 August 2016

 

Top of page