HIGH HURSTWOOD

ITS HISTORY from the STONE AGE to the 21st CENTURY

 

ITS BUILDINGS AND LANDS, THE FAMILIES THAT OCCUPIED THEM,

AND THE ACTIVITIES THAT WENT ON THERE

 

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The BOOKER Family

 

Richard & Dorothy Booker’s Family

John & Harriet Booker’s Family

Henry & Sarah Ann Booker’s Family

Charles & Ann Booker’s Family

 

 

Henry & Sarah Ann Booker’s Family

 

Chart of Henry & Sarah Ann Booker's Family

 

Henry Booker married his first cousin, Sarah Ann Smith, known as Ann, at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted, Sussex on 12 November 1845. They had two children, both sons, born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish in 1846 and 1849. In the census of 30 March 1851 Henry and Sarah Ann were living at Lime Kiln House (now called Old Hall Cottage) in High Hurstwood with their two sons, and also Sarah Ann's illegitimate daughter and her father and brother. Henry was a grocer's shopman, and is thought to have been working for a Mr Reed who had a grocer's shop at Newlands Farm in High Hurstwood where Henry's parents lived. In the 1855 Post Office Directory of the Six Home Counties and the 1855 Kelly's Directory of Sussex Henry was listed as a beer retailer and shopkeeper of High Hurstwood, so it seems that he had probably taken over the grocer's shop at Newlands Farm from Mr Reed and was now also selling beer there. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Henry was recorded as being a visitor at Newlands Farm, his parent's home, and to be an out-of-business grocer. Sarah Ann was at Lime Kiln House with her two sons, and her father and brother. So it seems that Henry's grocer's shop and beer retailing business at Newlands was fairly short lived.

When her father died in 1863, Sarah Ann inherited a yearly income of £7. In the census of 2 April 1871 she was living at Lime Kiln House with her eldest son, her brother, and a lodger. Then in the censuses of the 3 April 1881 and the 5 April 1891 Sarah Ann was still living at Lime Kiln House, but now with only her brother for whom she was still acting as housekeeper. There was no record of her husband Henry in these last three censuses, even though Sarah Ann was recorded as being married, not a widow. Also her father in his will specifically states that Sarah Ann's annuity was to be paid to her, and not her existing husband, or a future one. This seems to indicate that Henry was not thought to be a very satisfactory husband and that sometime in the 1860s he left Sarah Ann and went away; though at the marriages of his sons, he was described as a farmer in 1870 and a shopkeeper in 1872.

During the 1880s the only newspapers people had in High Hurstwood were delivered once a week by Mr Errey in a pony and trap from Buxted, to Sarah Ann at Lime Kiln House, people collecting their papers from her there.

In the census of 31 March 1901 Sarah Ann, now aged 82, was continuing to live with her brother, William Smith, at Lime Kiln House. She described herself as being a widow even though her husband, Henry Booker, now aged 76 and describing himself as being married and a farm labourer, was an inmate of the Uckfield Union Workhouse. Sarah Ann died at High Hurstwood on 14 May 1904, at the age of 85, and she was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 18 May 1904. Two years later Henry died at the age of 81 (not 82 as given on his death certificate), his death being registered in Uckfield registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1906.

 

Their children were:

Spencer 1846-1932  William 1849-1919

 

 

 

Henry and Sarah Ann’s eldest child (Sarah Ann’s second) was Spencer Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex on 12 November 1846, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 21 February 1847. In the census of 30 March 1851 Spencer, at the age of 4, was living with his parents, brother, half-sister and maternal grandfather at Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Spencer, now aged 14, was working as a farm labourer and living with his mother, brother, maternal grandfather and uncle, William Smith, at Lime Kiln House. In the census of 2 April 1871 Spencer, at the age of 24, was working as a farm labourer and living with his mother and uncle, William Smith, at Lime Kiln House.

When he was 25 years old Spencer married 26-year-old Sophia Curd at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 9 November 1872. Sophia was the daughter of Thomas and Sophia Curd; she had been born at Five Ash Down in Buxted Parish on 11 August 1845, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 7 December 1845. Spencer and Sophia had six children born at High Hurstwood between 1873 and 1885.

In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living with their then four children in part of Lime Kiln House, next door to Spencer's mother and uncle, and Spencer was working as a farm labourer. During the 1880s Spencer and his brother William were ringers with the High Hurstwood Hand Bell Ringers, who were led and trained by their cousin Joe Muddle. In the census of 5 April 1891 Spencer and Sophia were living in one half of Ivy Hole Cottages in High Hurstwood with five of their children, and Spencer was still a farm labourer. Sophia died at High Hurstwood, at the age of 54 (not 53 as given on her burial record), and she was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 31 August 1899. In the census of 31 March 1901 Spencer was still living in one half of Ivy Hole Cottages in High Hurstwood, now with his three youngest children, and continuing to work as a farm labourer.

In 1904 Charles Leeson Prince, who was the trustee of the will of Spencer's grandfather James Smith, died, and at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 9 October 1905 the executors of Charles Leeson Prince appointed Spencer as the new trustee. At this court Spencer was described as being a labourer living at Old Hall Cottage (Lime Kiln House) in High Hurstwood. Then at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 13 November 1905 Spencer sold Lime Kiln House to Walter Lintott an estate agent of Lewes for £375. According to the terms of his grandfather's will Spencer would have had to share this money equally with his brother William and his half-sister Elizabeth if they were still alive, which they were, so Spencer would have received £125 of the sale.

In the census of 2 April 1911 Spencer was working as a labourer and living with the family of his youngest daughter, Sarah Ann Akehurst in one half of Old Hall Cottage. Then twenty-one years later Spencer was living at High View House in Uckfield, Sussex, the council's old folk's home, when he died at the age of 85. He was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 16 February 1932.

 

 

Spencer and Sophia’s eldest child was Rose Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 26 October 1873. In the census of 3 April 1881 Rose, at the age of 7, was living with her parents at Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood, and she was going to school. Rose would have attended High Hurstwood School, probably from the age of 5 until the age of 12. In the census of 5 April 1891 Rose, now aged 17, was a live-in housemaid at a school for young boys run by Anne Jane Fitzhugh at 11 Springfield Road in Preston near Brighton in Sussex.

When she was 22 years old Rose married 28-year-old Thomas Shipton at the Parish Church of Holy Cross in Uckfield, Sussex on 16 April 1896. Thomas had been born at Uckfield and his birth registered as Thomas Timothy Shipton during the 1st quarter of 1867. He was baptised as Thomas Shipton illegitimate son of spinster Caroline Shipton at the Parish Church of Holy Cross in Uckfield on 9 October 1868. Though his birth was registered with the second name of Timothy he never seems to have used it.

Thomas and Rose had one child born just before their marriage. Four years later Thomas died at Uckfield, at the age of 33, and he was buried in Uckfield Cemetery on 10 November 1900. In the census of the 31 March 1901 Rose and her daughter were living with two of her late husband's bachelor uncles, Henry and Albert Shipton, at 10 North Row in Uckfield, and Rose was acting as their housekeeper. Rose then had another daughter born in early 1902 that couldn't have been fathered by her late husband and was most likely fathered by her husband to be whom she married later that year.

Rose at the age of 29, married 34-year-old bachelor James Hargraves in Uckfield registration district during the 4th quarter of 1902. James was a distant cousin of Rose and had been living next-door to Rose at 9 North Row with his widowed mother. James was the son of John and Sarah Hargraves, he had been born at Uckfield in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Cross in Uckfield on 20 August 1868. After their marriage James and Rose had three children born at Uckfield in 1904, 1906 and 1908. In the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at 13 North Row with their two youngest children and Rose's two children; James was a general labourer and their other child was living with Rose's uncle, Henry Shipton, at 9 North Row.

Rose died at the age of 43, her death being registered in Uckfield registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1916. Seventeen years later James died at the age of 65, his death being registered in Uckfield registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1933.

 

 

 

Thomas and Rose’s only child was Florence Rose Booker/Shipton who was born at Uckfield in Sussex. Her birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1896 as Florence Rose Shipton Booker, and she was baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Cross in Uckfield on 20 March 1896 as Florence Rose Booker, the illegitimate daughter of Rose Booker. In the census of 31 March 1901 Florence, at the age of 5, was living with her widowed mother at 10 North Row in Uckfield, the home of her later father's two bachelor uncles, Henry and Albert Shipton. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Florence, now aged 15, was living with her mother and stepfather at 13 North Row in Uckfield.

 

Rose’s illegitimate child, her second child, was Annie Shipton who was born at Uckfield in Sussex and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1902. In the census of 2 April 1911 Annie, at the age of 9, was going to school and living with her mother and ‘stepfather’ at 13 North Row in Uckfield.

 

James and Rose’s eldest child (Rose’s third) was James Hargraves who was born at Uckfield in Sussex and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1904. In the census of 2 April 1911 James, at the age of 7, was living with his mother’s uncle, Henry Shipton, at 9 North Row in Uckfield.

 

James and Rose’s second child (Rose’s fourth) was John Patrick Hargraves who was born at Uckfield in Sussex and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1906. In the census of 2 April 1911 John, at the age of 5, was going to school and living with his parents at 13 North Row in Uckfield.

 

James and Rose’s third child (Rose’s fifth) was Mabel Hargraves who was born at Uckfield in Sussex and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1908. In the census of 2 April 1911 Mabel, at the age of 2, was living with her parents at 13 North Row in Uckfield.

 

 

Spencer and Sophia’s second child was Andrew Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 18 July 1876, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 13 August 1876. In the census of 3 April 1881 Andrew, at the age of 4, was living with his parents at Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood. Andrew would have attended High Hurstwood School, probably from the age of 5 to the age of 12. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Andrew, now aged 14, was living with his parents in one half of Ivy Hole Cottages in High Hurstwood.

In the census of 31 March 1901 Andrew, at the age 24, was a gardener boarding with the family of ostler Amos Hazelden at New Road in Buxted, Sussex. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Andrew, at the age of 34, was a groom and gardener continuing to board with the family of Amos Hazelden, now at Merton Villa in Buxted. During the First World War Andrew was in the army and served at Salonica, Gallipoli, and in the Middle East.

When he was 44 years old Andrew married 30-year-old Daisy Matilda Hazelden at St Mary the Virgin Church in Buxted during the 1st quarter of 1921. Daisy was the daughter of John and Elizabeth Hazelden, the family that Andrew had been boarding with for years, and she had been born at Buxted on 7 November 1890. Andrew and Daisy didn't have any children. Andrew worked as a coachman at New House in High Hurstwood and at Buxted Park. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 they were living at 42 Hurstwood Road in Buxted and Andrew was now a gardener.

They were living at 1 Etchingwood in Buxted when Daisy died at the age of 67, and was buried in St Mary the Virgin Churchyard at Buxted on 24 May 1958. Twenty-four years later Andrew died at Highview House, the council old folks' home, in Uckfield, Sussex on 28 January 1982, at the grand old age of 105, and he was buried in St Mary the Virgin Churchyard at Buxted on 3 February 1982.

 

 

Spencer and Sophia’s third child was Albert Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 21 August 1878, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 17 November 1878. In the census of 3 April 1881 Albert, at the age of 2, was living with his parents at Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Albert, now aged 12, was living with his parents in one half of Ivy Hole Cottages in High Hurstwood, and he was going to school. Albert would have attended High Hurstwood School, probably from the age of 5 to the age of 12.

A letter of reference from B Martin of Park House, Brockley, London SE dated 27 September 1900 stated that A Booker had been in his employment as an under gardener for 13 months and had given entirely satisfactory service. In the census of 31 March 1901 Albert, at the age of 22, was boarding with Janet Shellon and her daughter at 4 St Wilfrids Villa in Haywards Heath, Sussex.

When he was 25 years old Albert married 20-year-old Annie Eliza Pannell at the Parish Church of St Mary in West Chiltington, Sussex on 7 October 1903. Annie was the daughter of Frederick and Emma Pannell, and she had been born at Weydown, Thursley, Surrey on 23 August 1883.

A letter of reference from A M Treacher of Calbourne in Haywards Heath dated 2 July 1904 states that Albert Booker had been in her employment as a gardener for 3 years and 9 months, and had given complete satisfaction in producing flowers and vegetables and doing hot house work. This letter was addressed to Albert at Little Hagland Farm in West Chiltington, which was the home of Annie’s parents. In the 1901 census Annie had been a live-in housemaid to Alice M Treacher for whom this letter of reference shows that Albert was then working as a gardener.

Albert and Annie had three children, all daughters, born West Chiltington in 1907, 1910 and 1919. A letter to Annie from Alice M Treacher dated 13 August 1907, congratulating Annie on the birth of her first child, addresses Annie as 'Dear Nurse' indicating that Annie must have been children's nanny to the Treacher household. In the census of 2 April 1911 Albert and Annie with their then two daughters were living at Little Hagland Farm in West Chiltington, which Albert was farming on his own account. Living with them were Annie's parents, an uncle and a niece as well as two boarders. Later Albert and Annie lived at Copthorne, which lies between Crawley and East Grinstead in Sussex, and are known to have been there in the late 1920s.

Then Albert got a job as head gardener for Major-General Sir Hugh Bruce-Williams at Chillies in High Hurstwood, and he was listed as such in the 1930 edition of Kelly's Directory of Sussex. While Albert was head gardener at Chillies they lived in Chillies Oast House where Albert and Annie were still living in the National Register of 29 September 1939, all three of their daughters having by now married. They later moved a few yards up the road to Moulden Wood Cottages and Albert was gardener to Mr Arthur Maynard-Raikes who lived in a large house called Broom on the other side of the road. Albert and Annie were both very religious and may have been Jehovah's Witnesses.

In old age Albert and Annie went to live with their eldest daughter at 33 Parklands in Maresfield, Sussex. Albert died at Parklands on 29 October 1961, at the age of 83, and he was buried in Uckfield Cemetery. Five years later Annie had been living at Parklands when she died in Pouchlands Hospital at Chailey on 23 June 1966, at the age of 82, from cancer of the face, and was buried with her husband in Uckfield Cemetery.

 

 

 

Albert and Annie’s eldest child was Doris Elizabeth May Booker who was born West Chiltington in Sussex on 19 July 1907. In the census of 2 April 1911 Doris, at the age of 3, was living with her parents at Little Hagland Farm in West Chiltington. Later Doris moved with her parents to Copthorne in Sussex and then in the late 1920s to High Hurstwood in Sussex.

When she was 25 years old Doris married 32-year-old Fred Leslie Amor, known as Leslie, at Crowborough Register Office in Sussex on 21 June 1933. Leslie was then a master draper living with Doris' sister Hilda and her husband at South View in High Hurstwood and Doris was working in service and living at 11 Pelham Crescent, South Kensington, London. Leslie was the son of retired railway clerk Frederick Amor, and he had been born in Cardiff registration district in Wales where his birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1901.

Leslie and Doris didn't have any children, but they did look after foster children. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Leslie and Doris were living at The Bakery in Rushlake Green near Heathfield, Sussex; Leslie had his own business as a sundries salesman, and they had four-month-old Ernest Worsfold as a foster child. Later during the Second World War they moved to a wooden bungalow at High Hurstwood called Wind Harbour that was constructed out of old First World War army huts and situated near a similar building called Sun Harbour and a house called Upper Nordens. While living there they took in a young foster boy called John Wilson, who was admitted to High Hurstwood School on 1 May 1944, just before his 6th Birthday. Then just over two months later on the evening of Monday 17 July 1944 a German V1 flying bomb, known as a doodlebug, landed near to this bungalow virtually destroying it. Leslie was away at work but Doris was in the bungalow, she was in bed and survived the devastation because her dog was laying on top of her; the dog was killed and one of Doris' arms that was not covered by her dog was badly injured. Doris was in the Kent and Sussex Hospital at Tunbridge Wells for some considerable time and her injured arm never worked properly afterwards. Just where young John Wilson was, and if he suffered any injury, is not known, but the school register records that the 17th July was his last day at the school, and that the next day he left High Hurstwood and was boarded out by Lewes Council, who were presumable responsible for his foster care.

Later Leslie and Doris lived for many years at Ashdene Cottages in Rocks Lane at High Hurstwood. Leslie worked as an army chauffeur. Then they moved to 33 Parklands in Maresfield where Leslie died on 13 October 1955, at the age of 54, from cancer of the oesophagus. Doris' parents came to live with her at Parklands and she looked after them there until their deaths in 1961 and 1966. Later Doris moved to Ridgewood Manor Nursing Home in Uckfield where she died on 2 May 1996 at the age of 88.

 

 

Albert and Annie’s second child was Hilda Grace Booker who was born at West Chiltington in Sussex on 1 November 1910. In the census of 2 April 1911 Hilda, at the age of 5 months, was living with her parents at Little Hagland Farm in West Chiltington. Later Hilda moved with her parents to Copthorne in Sussex and then in the late 1920s to High Hurstwood in Sussex.

When she was 21 years old Hilda married 26-year-old Stanley David Muddle at Crowborough Register Office in Sussex on 30 July 1932. Stanley was then a dairyman living with his parents at Lime Cottages, Pound Green, Buxted, Sussex and Hilda was a domestic servant living with her parents at Chillies Oast House in High Hurstwood. Stanley was the son of George Michael and Mary Ann Muddle, and he had been born at Buxted on 9 November 1905.

Stanley and Hilda first lived at South View in Burnt Oak Road at High Hurstwood for which Stanley had signed a rental agreement with the owner, Martha Hobden, on 30 June 1932. They had one child who was born in Brighton Hospital during 1934. Then they moved just up the road from South View to Conway Crest for a short time, being recorded as living there with their daughter in the National Register of 29 September 1939, when Stanley was recorded as being a house painter and car driver. By 15 May 1940, when their daughter was readmitted to High Hurstwood School, they were living at 4 Parkhurst Cottages in High Hurstwood. Stanley was in the RAF during the Second World War, and then after the war he worked as a house painter in partnership with another man. In about 1954 the family moved from 4 Parkhurst Cottages to 21 St James Road in East Grinstead, Sussex where Stanley was a milk roundsman for about 20 years.

When Stanley retired they moved to 8 Innings Drive, Pevensey Bay, Sussex. Stanley died there on 4 October 1994, at the age of 88, from an abdominal aneurysm. After Stanley's death Hilda moved to Sanderstead, South Croydon, Surrey to be near her daughter. Hilda died in Mayday Hospital in Croydon on 8 October 2001, at the age of 90, from heart failure.

 

 

Albert and Annie’s third child was Marjorie Joyce Booker who was born West Chiltington in Sussex on 30 October 1919. Later Marjorie moved with her parents to Copthorne in Sussex and then in the late 1920s to High Hurstwood in Sussex.

When she was 18 years old Marjorie married 24-year-old Kenneth Bryan Head at the Parish Church of Christ Church in Fairwarp, Sussex on 25 December 1937. Kenneth had been born on 9 May 1913. They always lived at Fairwarp, first at Rock Bungalow in Old Forge Lane where they were recorded as living with their first child in the National Register of 29 September 1939, when Kenneth was recorded as being a lorry driver and bricklayer's labourer. They later moved to 1 Hobbs Cottages in Fairwarp. They had three children, the first born in 1938 at Crowborough Hospital; the second in 1940 at 4 Parkhurst Cottages in High Hurstwood when Marjorie was staying with her sister Hilda's family; and the third in 1948 at Hobbs Cottages in Fairwarp when Marjorie was staying with her mother-in-law.

During the Second World War Kenneth was in the Home Guard, and he then worked as a tree cutter for the Mid-Sussex Timber Company. Later he worked on the construction of Gatwick Airport, and after that as a gardener. Kenneth died in Brighton Hospital on 19 February 1982 at the age of 68, and seventeen years later Marjorie died at her daughter's home in Ringmer, Sussex on 28 March 1999 at the age of 79. They were both cremated at Brighton Crematorium.

 

 

 

Spencer and Sophia’s fourth child was Thomas Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 2 September 1880, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 12 December 1880. In the census of 3 April 1881 Thomas, at the age of 8 months, was living with his parents at Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Thomas, now aged 10, was living with his parents in one half of Ivy Hole Cottages in High Hurstwood, and he was going to school. Thomas would have attended High Hurstwood School, probably from the age of 5 to the age of 12.

In the census of 31 March 1901 Thomas, at the age of 20, was working as a domestic gardener and living with his widowed father in one half of Ivy Hole Cottages in High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Thomas, at the age of 30, was living with the family of his brother Ernest at Brooks Farm in Crowborough, Sussex. Thomas was a cowman working for his brother, who was a dairy farmer.

When he was 40 years old Thomas married 38-year-old widow Eliza Emily Cole, whose maiden name was Frost, at St John's Church in Crowborough on 29 January 1921. Thomas was then a farm labourer living at Gilridge Farm, Crowborough, where he worked for his brother Ernest, and Eliza was living at Mardens Hill in Crowborough. Eliza's previous marriage in East Grinstead registration district during the 4th quarter of 1915 to Walter William Cole, who had died in East Grinstead registration district during October 1918 aged 28, had produced two daughters, born in 1916 and 1919, the second of whom died when just a year old.

 

 

Thomas and Eliza had one child, a daughter, born in 1922 when they were living at Stone Cottage, Mardens Hill, Crowborough. Then the following year they were living at Kidders Ash near Burnt Oak on the border between High Hurstwood and Crowborough parishes when Eliza's daughter Annie was admitted to High Hurstwood School in December 1923. They stayed at Kidders Ash until October 1927 when they moved to 9 Palesgate near Steel Cross in Crowborough. They stayed at 9 Palesgate for only a few months before moving to Brattles at Inchreed Farm near Burnt Oak during the period July to September 1928, while Thomas continued to work as a cowman. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Thomas and Emily were living at Copyhold Farm Cottage in Eridge, Sussex with their daughter and Thomas was still a farm cowman.

Thomas died when he was just on 94 years old, his death being registered in Uckfield registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1974. Three years later Eliza died in Uckfield registration district on 2 August 1977, at the age of 95.

 

 

Walter and Eliza’s eldest child is Annie Dorothy Cole who was born in East Grinstead registration district in Sussex on 28 August 1916. Annie had attended St Johns School in Crowborough before she was admitted to High Hurstwood School on 17 December 1923. Annie left High Hurstwood School on 21 October 1927 to go on to Steel Cross School at Crowborough where she was admitted on 31 October 1927. The following year she left Steel Cross School on 10 July 1928 and was readmitted to High Hurstwood School on 17 September 1928. Annie finally left High Hurstwood School on 16 August 1930, just before her fourteenth birthday.

 

 

Annie first worked as a domestic servant to the Gubbins family at Chillies Farm in High Hurstwood. Then in about 1932 Annie went to work for Charles and Alice Leeves at the Royal Oak public house in High Hurstwood, where she stayed until 1937 when Alice died and Charles gave up the pub. She then went to work for Alice's brother Albert Bailey and his wife Eva at the Lewes Road Tavern in Newhaven. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Annie was living with Albert and Eva Bailey at the Lewes Road Tavern and described as their domestic servant. After Albert's death in late 1943 Annie helped Eva continue to run the pub for about a year, before they gave it up and both went to live in a flat in an old converted convent in Newhaven, from where Annie went out to work, Eva having retired. Then in about 1952 they left the flat when Eva went to live with her brother in Crowborough, Annie going to live with one of her relatives. See the page for the Hoath & Bailey Family for greater detail on Annie's involvement with the Bailey family.

 

 

When she was 44 years old Annie married 45-year-old Alfred George Onslow at Lewes Register Office in Sussex on 16 October 1960. Alfred had been born in West Ham registration district, Essex on 4 April 1915. They lived at Hove in Sussex where Alfred worked as a barman and warehouseman. Alfred died on 15 July 1989, at the age of 74. Then 22 years later Annie was living at 38 Summerdale Road in Hove when she died in the Royal Sussex County Hospital in Brighton on 13 May 2011, at the age of 94. She died from a heart attack the day after an operation on her leg, which had been fractured when she had a fall.

 

 

Walter and Eliza’s second child was Hetty Emily Cole who was born in East Grinstead registration district in Sussex during April 1919 and died in East Grinstead registration district in Sussex during April 1920, when just on one-year-old.

 

Thomas and Eliza’s only child (Eliza’s third) was Sybil Joyce Booker who was born at Crowborough in Sussex on 12 March 1922, and baptised at St John's Church in Crowborough on 14 May 1922. When she was five years old Sybil was admitted to High Hurstwood School in Sussex on 26 April 1927, she left on 21 October 1927 to go to Steel Cross School at Crowborough where she was admitted on 31 October 1927. The following year she left Steel Cross School on 10 July 1928 and was readmitted to High Hurstwood School on 17 September 1928. Sybil finally left High Hurstwood School sometime after 1930 to go to Hadlow Down School.

Sybil was in the Land Army during the Second World War. She never married and lived at Crowborough where she worked as a cook at several places including Dr Adams, Col Gibbs, The Boy's School, and finally Crowborough Hospital. Sybil suffered from diabetes, which resulted in a heart attack from which she died on 25 April 1982, at the age of 60. She was cremated at Downs Crematorium in Brighton and her ashes were buried in Crowborough Cemetery.

 

 

 

Spencer and Sophia’s fifth child was Ernest James Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 2 July 1882, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 20 August 1882. In the census of 5 April 1891 Ernest, at the age of 8, was living with his parents in one half of Ivy Hole Cottages in High Hurstwood and he was going to school. Ernest would have attended High Hurstwood School, probably from the age of 5 to the age of 12. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Ernest, now aged 18, was working as a domestic gardener and living with his widowed father in one half of Ivy Hole Cottages in High Hurstwood.

When he was 26 years old Ernest married 20-year-old Daisy Hobden at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 17 October 1908. They were both then living at High Hurstwood and Ernest was working as a dairyman. Daisy was the daughter of farmer John George Hobden and his wife Martha, and she had been born at Warbleton in Sussex on 23 March 1888. She moved with her parents to Crowborough in Sussex and then in about 1896 to High Hurstwood.

Ernest and Daisy had three children, the first born at Crowborough in 1910. In the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at Brooks Farm in Crowborough with their young daughter and Ernest was a dairy farmer producing and selling milk in a small way. They had Ernest's brother Thomas living with them and working for Ernest as a cowman. Ernest and Daisy's other two children were born at Crowborough later in 1911 and in 1913 while Ernest continued to be a dairy farmer. Ernest was farming at Gilridge in Crowborough when his brother Thomas, who was still working for him, married in 1921. Ernest and Daisy then lived at Horsham before they moved to Daisy's parent's home, South View in High Hurstwood, in early 1923; moving on to Nutley in early 1924 where they only stayed for a few months.

By July 1924 they were living at Shorn Brook in the Steel Cross area of Crowborough, and it was probably about this time that Daisy ran off with the baker from the Boarshead area of Crowborough, abandoning her husband and children. This resulted in Ernest having to bring up the children by himself. Daisy ended up in London where she finally left the baker. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Daisy was living as the supposed wife of Albert Andrews, who was a lorry driver, at 23A Lavender Hill in Battersea, London. She later ended up doing quite well for herself, owning property, including three flats, which her children used. Daisy was living at 8 Hannington Road in Clapham, London when she died at St James Hospital in Balham, London on 12 December 1962, at the age of 74. Probate of Daisy's will was granted to her son Hilary Ernest Booker by the London Probate Registry on 23 April 1963, when her effects were valued at £7190 2s.

When his father-in-law John George Hobden died on 26 September 1924 Ernest was one of the three executors and trustees of his will. While acting in this capacity in 1934 Ernest was recorded as being a farmer living at Milk Lodge in Rotherfield. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Ernest was living at Milk Lodge with his daughter Joan and son Hilary, he was working as a cowman and his daughter Joan was acting as his housekeeper. Ernest died in October 1972, at the age of 90, at Christchurch in Dorset, presumably while staying with the family of his daughter Joan Street. He was buried in the Churchyard of St Denys at Rotherfield.

 

 

 

Ernest and Daisy’s eldest child was Joan Booker who was born at Crowborough in Sussex on 28 June 1910, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood, Sussex on 27 August 1910. In the census of 2 April 1911 Joan, at the age of 9 months, was living with her parents at Brooks Farm in Crowborough. She moved with her parents to Horsham and then in early 1923 they moved to her maternal grandparents' home at High Hurstwood. So when she was twelve years old Joan was admitted to High Hurstwood School on 18 April 1923, having previously been at school in Horsham. She left High Hurstwood School on 21 March 1924 to go on to Nutley School where she stayed for only a few months while her parents were living at Nutley. She was then admitted to Steel Cross School at Crowborough on 7 July 1924 when her parents moved to Shorn Brook at Steel Cross, she stayed at Steel Cross School until leaving on 21 August 1925 at the age of 15. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Joan, at the age of 29, was living with her father and brother Hilary at Milk Lodge in Rotherfield and acting as their housekeeper.

When she was 30 years old Joan married 28-year-old Arthur Lewis Street in Christchurch registration district in Dorset during the 3rd quarter of 1940. Arthur had been born in Ringwood registration district in Hampshire on 26 June 1912. They had one child, a daughter, born in Christchurch registration district during 1943. Arthur died in Bournemouth registration district in Dorset on 24 December 1989, at the age of 77. Seven years later Joan died in Poole registration district in Dorset on 25 August 1996, at the age of 87, and she was cremated on 4 September 1996.

 

Ernest and Daisy’s second child was Rupert Langton Booker who was born at Crowborough in Sussex on 26 October 1911, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood, Sussex on 26 December 1911. He moved with his parents to Horsham and then in early 1923 they moved to his maternal grandparents' home at High Hurstwood. When he was eleven years old Rupert was admitted to High Hurstwood School on 18 April 1923, having previously been at a school in Horsham. He left High Hurstwood School on 21 March 1924 to go on to Nutley School where he stayed for only a few months while his parents were living at Nutley. He was then admitted to Steel Cross School at Crowborough on 7 July 1924 when his parents moved to Shorn Brook at Steel Cross, he stayed at Steel Cross School until leaving on 21 December 1925 at the age of 14.

When he was 24 years old Rupert married 27-year-old Jessie Hardie Souness in Uckfield registration district in Sussex during the 1st quarter of 1936. Jessie was Scottish and had been born on 16 October 1908. They had one child, a daughter, born in Tonbridge registration district in Kent during 1936. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Rupert and Jessie were living at 2 New Road in Rotherfield, and Rupert was a taxi proprietor. There are also four closed records, one of which would be their young daughter. Rupert was a driver when his daughter married in 1955, and he served a term in prison, it's though for fraud. Jessie died in Tonbridge registration district on 26 September 1969, at the age of 60. Fifteen years later Rupert died in Uckfield registration district at the age of 73, his death being registered during November 1984.

 

Ernest and Daisy’s third child was Hilary Ernest Booker who was born at Crowborough in Sussex on 26 January 1913, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood, Sussex on 4 May 1913. He moved with his parents to Horsham and then in early 1923 they moved to his maternal grandparents' home at High Hurstwood. When he was ten years old Hilary was admitted to High Hurstwood School on 18 April 1923, having previously been at a school in Horsham. He left High Hurstwood School on 21 March 1924 to go on to Nutley School where he stayed for only a few months while his parents were living at Nutley. He was then admitted to Steel Cross School at Crowborough on 7 July 1924 when his parents moved to Shorn Brook at Steel Cross, he stayed at Steel Cross School until leaving on 13 April 1927 at the age of 14. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Hilary, at the age of 26, was working as a motor cycle mechanic and living with his father and sister Joan at Milk Lodge in Rotherfield.

When he was 41 years old Hilary married 40-year-old widow Annie Caroline R Tapp, whose maiden name was Jenner, in Tonbridge registration district in Kent during the 3rd quarter of 1954. Annie had been born in Tonbridge registration district on 9 April 1914; then in 1939 she had married Clifford G Tapp, who died in late 1940, and then had a daughter, Roseanne M Tapp, in 1941. Hilary and Annie didn't have any children except Annie's daughter from her previous marriage. They lived at Jarvis Brook in Sussex, and Hilary was described as a forestry worker when he was granted probate of his mother's will in 1963. Hilary died in Uckfield registration district in Sussex on 8 March 1996, at the age of 83. Then nine years later Annie died at the age of 91, her death being registered in Uckfield registration district during December 2005.

 

 

Spencer and Sophia’s sixth child was Sarah Ann Booker, known as Annie, who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1885. Annie was not baptised until she was about 16 years old, at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 13 May 1901.

In the census of 5 April 1891 Annie, at the age of 5, was living with her parents in one half of Ivy Hole Cottages in High Hurstwood, and she was going to school. Annie would have attended High Hurstwood School, probably from the age of 5 to the age of 12, and she was in a High Hurstwood School group photo of circa 1895 when she would have been about 10. In the census of 31 March 1901 Annie, now aged 15, was living with her widowed father and her brothers Thomas and Ernest in one half of Ivy Hole Cottages in High Hurstwood and probably keeping house for them.

When she was 22 years old Annie married 19-year-old Albert Stenning Akehurst at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 24 April 1907. They were both then living at High Hurstwood, and Albert was working as a groom and gardener. Albert was the son of George and Kate Akehurst; he had been born at Henfield in Sussex on 15 March 1888. Albert and Annie had two children, both sons, the first was born at High Hurstwood in 1907. In the census of 2 April 1911 they were living in one half of Old Hall Cottage in High Hurstwood with their son; Albert was a groom and gardener and Annie's widowed father, Spencer Booker, was living with them. Their second son was born at High Hurstwood in 1914 and when this son was baptised in 1915 Albert was recorded as being a gardener. They were still living at Old Hall Cottage when their younger son, Stanley, started attending High Hurstwood School in 1919, and they are known to have later lived at Church Cottage in High Hurstwood.

It was probably in 1926, when their son Stanley transferred to Poundgate School, that they moved to Bartons Cottage at the top of Chillies Lane. Albert was probably working as a gardener for the Langridge family that lived in the house called Bartons. They were continuing to live at Bartons Cottage and Albert was still a gardener when their two sons married in 1935 and 1938. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Albert and Annie were living at Bartons Cottage; Albert was a head gardener and they had their son Stanley with his wife and son living with them.

They were living at Bartons Bungalow (presumably another name for Bartons Cottage) in Chillies Lane when Annie died on 24 June 1958, at the age 73. She was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 30 June 1958. Fifteen years later Albert was living at 11 Stone Cross Road in Crowborough when he died on 29 August 1973, at the age of 85, and was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 3 September 1973.

 

 

 

Albert and Annie’s eldest child was Charles Warwick Akehurst who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 19 September 1907, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 1 December 1907. In the census of 2 April 1911 Charles, at the age of 3, was living with his parents in one half of Old Hall Cottage in High Hurstwood.

When he was 27 years old Charles married 24-year-old Alice Mary Wells at the Parish Church of All Saints in Crowborough, Sussex on 26 June 1935. Charles was then a gardener living at Bartons Cottage in Chillies Lane, High Hurstwood, and Alice was living at Kingswood in St Johns Road, Crowborough. Alice was the daughter of Reuben and Ada Wells, and she had been born at Crowborough on 23 June 1911. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Charles and Alice were living with Alice's mother, Ada Wells, at Kingswood in St Johns Road, Crowborough and Charles was working as a gardener. Charles and Alice had two children; the first born at Nottingham in 1943 where Alice had probably been evacuated for the birth because of the war, and the second was born in Uckfield registration district in 1947. They lived in the St Johns area of Crowborough, which is in Uckfield registration district. When their daughter married in 1964 Charles was still working as a gardener.

Alice died in Uckfield registration district on 28 November 1986, at the age of 75. The following year Charles died in Tunbridge Wells registration district in Kent, at the age of 80, his death being registered during December 1987.

 

 

Albert and Annie’s second child was Stanley Ernest Akehurst who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 5 December 1914, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 4 July 1915. When he was five years old Stanley was admitted to High Hurstwood School on 8 December 1919. He left High Hurstwood School on 19 February 1926 to go on to Poundgate School when his parents moved to Burtons Cottage at the top of Chillies Lane in the Poundgate area of High Hurstwood.

When he was 23 years old Stanley married 23-year-old Ann Pauline Thompson at the Parish Church of All Saints in Crowborough, Sussex on 22 October 1938. Stanley was then a milk roundsman living in Chillies Lane at High Hurstwood, and Ann was living in Beacon Road at Crowborough. Ann was the daughter of John Thompson and she had been born in Ireland on 29 June 1915. Stanley and Ann had three children born in Uckfield registration district in 1939, 1943 and 1949. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Stanley and Ann, together with their young son, were living with Stanley's parents at Bartons Cottage, and Stanley was continuing to work as a milk roundsman. Then when their second child was baptised in 1944 they were living at Temple Grove School at Heron's Ghyll in High Hurstwood Parish, and Stanley was a carpenter.

Ann died at the age of 62, her death being registered in Tonbridge registration district in Kent during the 4th quarter of 1977. Twelve years later Stanley died at the age of 75, his death being registered in Cheltenham registration district in Gloucestershire during June 1990.

 

 

 

Henry and Sarah Ann’s second child (Sarah Ann’s third) was William Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 22 July 1849. In the census of 30 March 1851 William, at the age of 1, was living with his parents, brother, half-sister and maternal grandfather at Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 William, now aged 11, was working as a farm labourer and living with his mother, brother, maternal grandfather and uncle, William Smith, at Lime Kiln House.

When he was 21 years old William married 21-year-old Hannah Wood at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 28 May 1870. Hannah was the daughter of Edward and Mary Wood; she had been born at Fletching in Sussex and her birth registered during the 1st quarter of 1849. She was baptised at the Parish Church of St Andrew & St Mary the Virgin in Fletching on 10 June 1849. In the census of 2 April 1871 William and Hannah were living in one half of an unnamed cottage that no longer exists but stood behind where White Briars now stands, it was next to the Village Shop in High Hurstwood and was owned by William's uncle, Richard John Booker. William was continuing to work as a farm labourer.

William and Hannah had eight children born at High Hurstwood between 1872 and 1886, two of whom died in infancy in 1875 and 1877 and another at the age of 13 in 1887. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living in one part of what is now called Church Cottage in High Hurstwood, with their then four surviving children, and William was still a farm labourer. During the 1880s William and his brother Spencer were ringers with the High Hurstwood Hand Bell Ringers, who were led and trained by their cousin, Joe Muddle.

In the census of 5 April 1891 William and Hannah were living at Walshes in Crowborough, Sussex with their five surviving children, and William was continuing to work as a farm labourer. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 they were living in Brook Road at Jarvis Brook, Sussex with their three youngest children, and William was now a builder's labourer. When William's brother, Spencer Booker, as a trustee of the will of their grandfather, James Smith, sold Lime Kiln House in High Hurstwood in 1905 for £375 William, according to the terms of their grandfather's will, was to receive a third share, that is £125. In the census of 2 April 1911 William and Hannah were living in Western Road at Jarvis Brook with their three youngest sons and William was a pimp maker (kindling wood maker) working at home on his own account. Two of their sons, Hercules and Joseph, were killed in 1915 and 1918 while serving with the army in France during the First World War.

William and Hannah were living at Coal Wharf Cottage in Jarvis Brook, in Rotherfield Parish, when William died at the age of 70, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Denys at Rotherfield on 26 August 1919. Three years later Hannah was living at High View House in Uckfield, Sussex, the council's old folks' home, when she died at the age of 74, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Denys at Rotherfield on 8 February 1923.

 

 

 

William and Hannah’s eldest child was James Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 25 February 1872. James died at High Hurstwood when he was only 3 years old, and he was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 6 January 1875.

 

William and Hannah’s second child was George Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 12 December 1872, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 9 March 1873. In the census of 3 April 1881 George, at the age of 8, was going to school and living with his parents in one part of what is now called Church Cottage in High Hurstwood. In the 1911 census George recorded that he had been deaf since the age of 10. In the census of 5 April 1891 George, now aged 18, was working as a farm labourer and living with his parents at Walshes in Crowborough, Sussex.

When he was 25 years old George married 17-year-old Fanny Flora Barton, known as Florence, at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield, Sussex on 29 January 1898. George was then a farm labourer living at Brattles Cottage in Jarvis Brook in Rotherfield Parish, and Florence was also living at Jarvis Brook. Florence had been born at Rotherfield on 27 January 1881 and her birth registered under the name Fanny Flora Barton. She was almost certainly illegitimate and on the birth registrations of her children she gave her maiden name as Tasker. In the 1891 census she was living in Crowborough with Henry and Jemima Tasker as their niece Flora Barton. Both George and Florence were members of the Salvation Army and are thought to have possibly been wearing their Salvation Army uniforms when they married.

In the census of 31 March 1901 George and Florence were living at Maynards Gate Farm in Jarvis Brook, and George was continuing to work as a farm labourer. They had eleven children born between 1902 and 1924. They were still living at Maynards Gate when their first two children were born in 1902 and 1904, then when their next two children were born in 1906 and 1909 they were living at High Steep in Jarvis Brook. In the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at Brickyard Cottage, High Steep, Jarvis Brook with their four children and George was continuing to work as a farm labourer. They were still living at High Steep when their fifth child was born in June 1911.

When their sixth child was born in 1914 they were living at Inchreed Cottage in Jarvis Brook, and when their eighth child was born in 1918 they were at Sparr's Cottage in Jarvis Brook. They were still at Sparr's Cottage, Inchreed when, on 30 June 1919, on an army document of his brother Joseph, George was recorded a relative of his brother. George and Florence's other three children were born in 1920, 1922 and 1924 when they were at Inchreed Cottage. Sparr's Cottage and Inchreed Cottage were probably two names for the same house. George continued to work as a farm labourer during this time, and was still a farm labourer in the National Register of 29 September 1939 when George and Florence were living at 24 Palesgate in Crowborough.

George died at the age of 75, his death being registered in Uckfield registration district in Sussex during the 3rd quarter of 1948. Nine years later Florence died at the age of 76, her death being registered in Uckfield registration district during the 1st quarter of 1957.

 

 

 

George and Florence’s eldest child was Florence Margery Booker who was born at Maynards Gate in Jarvis Brook in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex on 9 July 1902, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 10 August 1902. In the census of 2 April 1911 Florence, at the age of 8, was going to school and living with her parents at Brickyard Cottage, High Steep, Jarvis Brook.

When she was 25 years old Florence married 22-year-old Albert Alfred Pursglove at Uckfield Register Office, Sussex on 16 July 1927. Albert was the son of Herbert and Lilian Pursglove and he had been born at Portslade in Sussex on 4 August 1904. Albert and Florence had six children born in Uckfield registration district between 1928 and 1944. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 they were living at 17 Palesgate in Crowborough with their then five children and Albert was working as a plumber for a builder. Albert died at Hellingly in Sussex on 17 February 1966, at the age of 61, from viral pneumonia. Thirty-two years later Florence died at Crowborough Hospital, Sussex on 23 June 1998, at the age of 95, following a stroke.

 

 

George and Florence’s second child was Annie Grace Booker, known as Grace, who was born at Maynards Gate in Jarvis Brook in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex on 20 June 1904, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 14 August 1904. In the census of 2 April 1911 Grace, at the age of 6, was going to school and living with her parents at Brickyard Cottage, High Steep, Jarvis Brook.

When she was 21 years old Annie married 32-year-old William David Godley at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 15 August 1925. William was then a farm labourer living at Inchreed Farm in Rotherfield Parish, and Grace was living at 24 St James Road in Tunbridge Wells, Kent. William was the son of David and Martha Godley; he had been born at Rotherfield and his birth registered during the 3rd quarter of 1893.

William and Grace had three children born in Uckfield registration district in Sussex in 1926, 1928 and 1933, the second of whom died in 1929 when only a year old. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 they were living at 13 Palesgate in Crowborough with their two surviving children and William was working as a council roadman. The two children of Grace's sister Mary Price had been evacuated from Lambeth in London and were living with them.

William died at the age of 54 (not 56 as given on his death certificate), his death being registered in Uckfield registration district during the 1st quarter of 1948. Thirty-three years later Grace died at the age of 77, her death being registered in Uckfield registration district during the 4th quarter of 1981.

 

George and Florence’s third child was Mary Jane Booker who was born at High Steep in Jarvis Brook in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex on 29 November 1906, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 30 December 1906. In the census of 2 April 1911 Mary, at the age of 4, was going to school and living with her parents at Brickyard Cottage, High Steep, Jarvis Brook.

When she was 20 years old Mary married 21-year-old Edward Price in Lambeth registration district in London during the 3rd quarter of 1927. Edward had been born on 23 February 1906. Edward and Mary had two children born in Lambeth registration district in 1929 and 1931. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Edward and Mary were living at 49 Elveden House in Lambeth and Edward was working as a motor driver and fitter. Their two children had been evacuated to live with the family of Mary's sister Grace Godley at Crowborough in Sussex.

Edward died at the age of 75, his death being registered in Croydon registration district in Surrey during the 3rd quarter of 1981. Eighteen years later Mary died when she was just on 93 years old, her death being registered in Lambeth registration district during the 4th quarter of 1999.

 

George and Florence’s fourth child was William George Harry Booker who was born at High Steep in Jarvis Brook in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex on 4 April 1909, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 2 May 1909. In the census of 2 April 1911 William, at the age of nearly 2, was living with her parents at Brickyard Cottage, High Steep, Jarvis Brook.

When he was 27 years old William married 29-year-old widow Harriet Rosina Rolfe, whose maiden name was Fryer, at St Michael & All Angels Church in Jarvis Brook on 30 May 1936. William was then a labourer living at 24 Palesgate in Crowborough, and Harriet was living at 2 Palesgate. Harriet was the daughter of George and Clara Fryer and she had been born at Chelsea in London on 10 October 1906. She married Albert G Rolfe in 1932 but he died the following year before they had any children.

William and Harriet had three children born in 1937, 1942 and 1947 while they were living at 5 Palesgate in Crowborough and William was working as a labourer. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 they were living at 5 Palesgate with their then one child and William was working as a labourer for a public works contractor. They were still living at 5 Palesgate when their daughter married in 1961, and William was then a driver. William died at the age of 72, his death being registered in Uckfield registration district in Sussex during the 2nd quarter of 1981. Seven years later Harriet died at the age of 81, her death being registered in Crawley registration district in Sussex during the 3rd quarter of 1988.

 

 

George and Florence’s fifth child was James Gordon Booker who was born at High Steep in Jarvis Brook in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex on 8 June 1911, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 9 July 1911.

When he was 23 years old James married 22-year-old Winifred Alice Riches Colbran at the Parish Church of All Saints in Crowborough, Sussex on 26 December 1934. James was then a market gardener living at 24 Pales Gate in Crowborough, and Winifred was living with her parents at 2 Fair View in Crowborough. Winifred was the daughter of Arthur and Janet Colbran and she had been born at Crowborough on 26 January 1912.

James and Winifred had two children, twins born in 1935 who both died soon after birth, while they were living at Blackness in Crowborough and James was working as a market gardener. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 James and Winifred were living at 1 High Broom Lane in Crowborough, James was a head gardener and a member of the Auxiliary Fire Service. James died at the age of 80, his death being registered in Uckfield registration district in Sussex during April 1992. Thirteen years later Winifred died at the age of 93, her death being registered in Uckfield registration district during December 2005.

 

George and Florence’s sixth child was Arthur Mons Booker who was born at Inchreed Cottage in Jarvis Brook in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex on 14 September 1914, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 25 October 1914. Arthur died at the age of 55, his death being registered in York registration district in Yorkshire during the 4th quarter of 1969.

 

George and Florence’s seventh child was William Booker who was born at Jarvis Brook in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex on 28 January 1917. William died at the age of 65, his death being registered in Tunbridge Wells registration district in Kent during the 2nd quarter of 1982.

 

George and Florence’s eighth child was Benjamin Alfred Booker who was born at Spars Cottage in Jarvis Brook in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex on 14 September 1918, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 20 January 1919. When he was 23 years old Benjamin married 19-year-old Irene F Bird in Chelmsford registration district in Essex during the 1st quarter of 1942. Irene was the daughter of Albert and Alice Bird and her birth had been registered in Colchester registration district in Essex during the 3rd quarter of 1922. Benjamin and Irene had two children born in Chelmsford registration district in 1942 and 1945. Benjamin died at the age of 27, his death being registered in Uckfield registration district during the 4th quarter of 1945. Five years later Irene, at the age of 27, married 29-year-old Ronald William Everitt in Chelmsford registration district during the 2nd quarter of 1950. Ronald had been born in Chelmsford registration district on 6 April 1921. Ronald and Irene had two children born in Chelmsford registration district in 1955 and 1957. Ronald died at the age of 83, his death being registered in Chelmsford registration district during November 2004.

 

George and Florence’s ninth child was Frederick Joseph Booker who was born at Inchreed Cottage in Jarvis Brook in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex on 11 May 1920, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 18 July 1920. When he was about 26 years old Frederick married 25-year-old Violet Kathleen Louisa Hamilton in Exeter registration district in Devon during the 2nd quarter of 1946. Violet's had been born in Exeter registration district on 19 September 1920. Frederick and Violet had three children, all daughters, born in Uckfield registration district in Sussex in 1947, 1951 and 1954. Frederick was working as a bricklayer when his daughter Gwenda married in 1975. Violet died at the age of 78, her death being registered in Uckfield registration district during January 1999.

 

George and Florence’s tenth child was Reginald Cyril Booker who was born at Inchreed Cottage in Jarvis Brook in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex on 10 July 1922, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 27 August 1922.

 

George and Florence’s eleventh child was Dorothy Lilian Booker who was born at Inchreed Cottage in Jarvis Brook in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex on 22 September 1924, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield on 31 October 1924. When she was 17 years old Dorothy married 32-year-old Sylvan Harry Hutchen at the Parish Church of All Saints in Crowborough, Sussex on 1 December 1941. Sylvan was then in the RCOC and living at Windlesham in Crowborough, and Dorothy was living at 24 Palesgate in Crowborough. They had two children born in Uckfield registration district in Sussex in 1942 and 1944.

 

 

William and Hannah’s third child was Jane Bookerwho was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 14 June 1874. In the census of 3 April 1881 Jane, at the age of 6, was going to school and living with her parents in one part of what is now called Church Cottage in High Hurstwood. Jane died at the age of 13, her death being registered in Uckfield registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1887.

 

William and Hannah’s fourth child was Mary Ann Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 22 December 1875, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 12 March 1876. Mary Ann died at High Hurstwood when only 18 months old, and she was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 22 July 1877.

 

William and Hannah’s fifth child was Hercules Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 2 January 1879, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 9 March 1879. In the census of 3 April 1881 Hercules, at the age of 2, was living with his parents in one part of what is now called Church Cottage in High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Hercules, now aged 12, was working as a farm labourer and living with his parents at Walshes in Crowborough, Sussex. In the census of 31 March 1901 Hercules, at the age of 22, was working as a carter on a farm and boarding with the family of farmer Alfred Marchant at Sand Hill Farm in Rotherfield Parish, Sussex. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Hercules, at the age of 32, was working as a coal porter and living with his parents in Western Road at Jarvis Brook, Sussex.

During the First World War Hercules was a 35-year-old labourer and living with his parents in Western Road, Jarvis Brook when he enlisted as Private G/962 in the Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) at Tonbridge Wells in Kant on 3 September 1914. He was then described as 5ft 3¾ins tall, had a 36ins fully expanded chest, good physical development, a fresh complexion, blue eyes and fair hair. He was posted to the 6th Battalion on 6 September 1914 and embarked for France on 1 June 1915. Hercules had been in France only four months and was still Private 962 in the 6th Battalion of the Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) when he was killed in action on 9 October 1915, at the age of 36.[1] He was buried in row M, grave 9, of the Sailly-Labourse Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France. Hercules was awarded three campaign medals, the Victory Medal, the British War Medal and the 1914-15 Star.[2]

 

 

William and Hannah’s sixth child was Elizabeth Mary Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex on 27 September 1880, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 12 December 1880. Elizabeth was baptised with just the name Elizabeth, but she had added the second name of Mary by the time she married. In the census of 3 April 1881 Elizabeth, at the age of 6 months, was living with her parents in one part of what is now called Church Cottage in High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Elizabeth, now aged 10, was living with her parents at Walshes in Crowborough, Sussex, and she was going to school. In the census of 31 March 1901 Elizabeth, at the age of 20, was living with her parents in Brook Road at Jarvis Brook, Sussex.

When she was 22 years old Elizabeth married 28-year-old John Warren Webb at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield, Sussex on 20 June 1903. They were both then living at Jarvis Brook and John was working as a driver. John was the son of John and Mary Webb, and he had been born at West Ham in Essex on 18 February 1875. John and Elizabeth had two children; the first born at High Hurstwood in 1905 and the second at Jarvis Brook in 1908. In the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at Wrens Nest, Western Road, Jarvis Brook with their two children and John was a labourer in the local brickyard.

By 1929, when their daughter married, they were living in Maidstone registration district in Kent. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 John and Elizabeth were living at Grasetts Cottages in Boughton Monchelsea near Maidstone with their son, John was retired farm labourer and they had 85-year-old retired farm labourer Charles Turner living with them. Elizabeth died at the age of 60 (not 61 as given on her death certificate), her death being registered in Maidstone registration district during the 1st quarter of 1941. Eight years later John died at the age of 74, his death being registered in Maidstone registration district during the 1st quarter of 1949.

 

 

John and Elizabeth’s eldest child was Irene Marjorie Webb who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex and her birth registered during the 2nd quarter of 1905. In the census of 2 April 1911 Irene, at the age of 5, was going to school and living with her parents at Wrens Nest, Western Road, Jarvis Brook, Sussex.

When she was 24 years old Irene married 32-year-old Charles William Possee in Maidstone registration district in Kent during the 4th quarter of 1929. Charles was the son of Charles and Ellen Possee; he had been born at Maidstone in Kent on 23 September 1897 and baptised at St Michael's Church in Maidstone on 5 December 1897. Charles and Irene had three children born in Maidstone registration district in 1931, 1934 and 1935, the last of whom died soon after birth.

They then moved to Kidderminster registration district in Worcestershire where Irene died at the age of 32, her death being registered during the 2nd quarter of 1937, the same quarter that their eldest child died at the age of 5. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 Charles and his surviving child were boarding with the family of Harold and Gladys Owen at 402 Stourport Road in Kidderminster, and Charles was working as a trimmer in a sugar factory. Fifteen years after his wife's death Charles died at the age of 55, his death being registered in Kidderminster registration district during the 4th quarter of 1952.

 

John and Elizabeth’s second child was William John Webbwho was born at Jarvis Brook in Sussex on 12 May 1908. In the census of 2 April 1911 William, at the age of 2 was living with his parents at Wrens Nest, Western Road, Jarvis Brook, Sussex. By 1929 William had moved with his parents to Maidstone registration district in Kent. In the National Register of 29 September 1939 William, at the age of 31, was an incapacitated farm labourer living with his parents at Grasetts Cottages in Boughton Monchelsea near Maidstone. William never married. He died at the age of 46, his death being registered in Maidstone registration district during the 4th quarter of 1954.

 

 

William and Hannah’s seventh child was Benjamin Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of Holy Trinity in High Hurstwood on 6 January 1884. In the census of 5 April 1891 Benjamin, at the age of 8, was living with his parents at Walshes in Crowborough, Sussex, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Benjamin, now aged 18, was working as a builder's labourer and living with his parents in Brook Road at Jarvis Brook, Sussex. In the census of 2 April 1911 Benjamin, at the age of 28, was working as a stoker on a traction engine and living with his parents in Western Road at Jarvis Brook. Benjamin was still living with his parents in Western Road at Jarvis Brook when he was recorded, on 8 August 1919, on an army document of his brother Joseph, as a relative of his brother.

When he was 38 years old Benjamin married 22-year-old Minnie Matilda Puttick at the Parish Church of St Denys in Rotherfield, Sussex on 4 December 1920. Benjamin was then a labourer living in Western Road at Jarvis Brook, and Minnie was living at Derridge Cottages in Jarvis Brook. Minnie was the daughter of John and Eliza Puttick and she had been born at Portslade in Sussex on 12 November 1898. Benjamin and Minnie had one child born at Derridge Cottages in Jarvis Brook during 1921.

It seems that since their marriage Benjamin and Minnie had lived with Benjamin's widowed mother at Coal Wharf Cottage in Western Road, Jarvis Brook. Then the 12 May 1922 edition of the Kent & Sussex Courier reported that at Mark Cross Petty Sessions on 9 May 1922 Minnie Matilda Booker, who was now back living with her parents at Derridge Cottages, had summoned Benjamin Booker for desertion since 22 April. Minnie stated that Benjamin was a builder's labourer who was then out of work, and that he had deserted her twice before. Benjamin admitted that he had deserted his wife on 22 April and that he hadn't paid her any money since, as she had been running him into debt. Minnie said that she couldn't stand him and asked for a Separation Order, as she couldn't put up with him. Both him and his mother were drunkards and there wouldn't have been a bill owing if he had paid her. Benjamin stated that they were always growling and grumbling at him; he had tried to do his best, but he never seemed to do anything right. He was willing to provide a home for his wife away from his mother and that he had furniture for two rooms, but he was currently out of work and not receiving any unemployment pay. The Court Missioner reported that the couple were in trouble four months ago and Benjamin had promised then to treat his wife properly. The Bench adjourned the case so that the Court Missioner could see if he could bring them back together, and in the meantime Benjamin was to pay his wife £1 per week.

Benjamin and Minnie were not reconciled and on 10 October 1922 the Bench ordered Benjamin to continue paying his wife £1 per week. But it seems that Benjamin soon got behind with his payments to Minnie and the 6 April 1923 edition of the Kent & Sussex Courier reported that at Mark Cross Petty Sessions on 3 April 1923 Benjamin Booker was charged with being in arrears by £5 10s and the Probation Officer reported that by 30 March this had become £7 10s. Benjamin stated that he had left his employment at Jarvis Brook because he couldn't do the work due to a bad back. He had been out of work for three weeks and had been away in Kent looking for employment. The Bench sent Benjamin to prison for 14 days.

It seems that on 28 April 1923, after he had served his prison term, that Benjamin started living with Minnie again, but after only three months, on the 21 July, he had again deserted her and not paid her any money. So at Mark Cross Petty Sessions on 14 August 1923 Minnie again applied for a Separation Order but the case was adjourned for two weeks as reported in the 17 August 1923 edition of the Kent & Sussex Courier.

The resumed hearing at Mark Cross Petty Sessions on 28 August 1923 was reported in the 31 August 1923 edition of the Kent & Sussex Courier. Benjamin now attended the court and stated that when he had returned to Minnie she had promised that they would have their meals by themselves, but after a little while his wife's relations were always present, and although he had given her money he only received some slices of bread and butter for dinner. Minnie produced grocer's bills and said that she had always fed her husband properly. Benjamin replied that when he gave her money she always handed it over to her mother, who was the 'boss' in the place, and he didn't want a separation order. From this is seems that when Benjamin had returned to Minnie they had been living with Minnie's parents at Derridge Cottage in Jarvis Brook. Minnie asked for £1 per week maintenance, but Benjamin replied that he only earned £1 10s and the Court Missioner stated that he thought that Benjamin was not able to pay £1 per week, so the Bench ordered that the payments should be 15s per week. The Bench considered that there were not sufficient grounds for a Separation Order and adjourned the case for a month in the hope that the parties could be reconciled.

The case was resumed again at Mark Cross Petty Sessions on 25 September 1923 and was reported in the 28 September 1923 edition of the Kent & Sussex Courier. Benjamin was not present and Minnie stated that he was earning as much as 16s per day working at Jarvis Brook but had not paid her anything since the last hearing. The Bench made a new order for Benjamin to pay his wife 15s per week and costs.

There are no records of what then happened to Benjamin and no registration of his death can be found. So it's thought that Benjamin may have left the area and changed his name to avoid making payments to Minnie. In 1938 Minnie had a daughter whose father is unknown, though Minnie put her husband Benjamin as the father on the birth certificate it's known that it could be him and family rumour suggests that it might have been one of Minnie's brothers. Then in the National register of 29 September 1939 Minnie, who stated that she was still married, and her young daughter were living at 1 Durridge Cottages at Jarvis Brook, and Minnie stated that she was doing domestic work. Living with Minnie was her bachelor brother, 47-year-old farm labourer George Puttick, and her newly married elder daughter Dorothy with her husband, 19-year-old builder's labourer Arthur Miller.

It's assumed that after there had been no contact with Benjamin for at least seven years that Minnie had him declared dead, or had found out that he had died under whatever name he was then using; because Minnie was a 47-year-old widow when she married 46-year-old bachelor Arthur Ebenezer David Simmance at the Parish Church of St Michael and All Angels in Jarvis Brook on 13 February 1945. They were both then living at Claylands Cottage in the High Street at Jarvis Brook, and Arthur was a cowman. Arthur was the son of Arthur and Dorothy Simmance and he had been born at Peckham in London on 4 May 1899.

Arthur died at the age of 77, his death being registered in Tonbridge registration district in Kent during the 4th quarter of 1976. Five years later Minnie died at the age of 83, her death being registered in Tunbridge Wells registration district in Kent during the 1st quarter of 1982.

 

 

Benjamin and Minnie’s only child was Dorothy Rose Booker who was born at Durridge Cottages in Jarvis Brook, Sussex on 6 October 1921. When she was 17-years-old Dorothy married 19-year-old Arthur Charles Miller in Uckfield registration district on 16 September 1939 after getting a Special Licence from Mark Cross Magistrates because Arthur's mother refused to give her consent that was needed as Arthur was underage. Arthur had been born at New Road in Buxted, Sussex on 24 November 1919. Arthur and Dorothy had five children born between 1941 and 1960. Arthur died at his home, 4 Jonas Cottages in Wadhurst, Sussex on the 23 May 1981, at the age of 61, from cancer. Eighteen years later Dorothy died at the Kent & Sussex Hospital in Tunbridge Wells, Kent on 29 July 1999, at the age of 77, from organ failure. Both Arthur and Dorothy were cremated at the Kent & Sussex Crematorium in Tunbridge Wells.

 

 

William and Hannah’s eighth child was Joseph Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1886. In the census of 5 April 1891 Joseph, at the age of 4, was living with his parents at Walshes in Crowborough, Sussex. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Joseph, now aged 14, was working as a builder's labourer and living with his parents in Brook Road at Jarvis Brook, Sussex. In the census of 2 April 1911 Joseph, at the age of 24, was working as a farm labourer and living with his parents in Western Road at Jarvis Brook.

During the First World War Joseph, at the age of 29, was still a farm labourer and living with his parents in Western Road when he enlisted as Private G/9224 in the Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) at Eastbourne on 27 July 1915. He was then described as 5ft 4½ins tall, weighed 130lbs, had a 36½ins fully expanded chest and good physical development. He was posted to the 9th Battalion on 31 July 1915 and then transferred to the 1st (Reserve) Garrison Battalion of the Suffolk Regiment on 12 April 1916 as Private 28121. From 24 to 26 July 1916 Joseph was absent without leave having overstayed his pass by two days while on active service and was punished with 7 days Field Punishment No 2. This punishment normally consisted of being kept in irons and made to do hard labour.

On 17 May 1917 Joseph was transferred back to the Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) as Private G/9224, initially to the 3rd Battalion, and then on 14 June 1917 he was sent to France to serve with the 1st Battalion, transferring to the 11th Battalion on 3 July 1917. He was wounded on 19 September 1917 and returned to England two days later, having been in France for 99 days. While he was at the Regimental Depot at Maidstone he was given at furlough from 16 to 26 November 1917, which he spent at his parents' home in Western Road, Jarvis Brook. He was in England for 172 days, returning to France on 12 March 1918 where he was wounded again, receiving a bullet wound in the left arm on 28 March 1918. He returned to England on Hospital Ship Viper on 4 April 1918, having been in France this time for just 23 days. He was in the Kitchener Hospital in Brighton for 13 days before going to the Regimental Depot at Maidstone. He was given furlough from 20 to 29 April 1918, which he spent at his parents' home in Western Road, Jarvis Brook. He was in England this time for 135 days.

He returned to France on 17 August 1918 and was serving with the 7th Battalion of the Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) when he was killed in action on 22 September 1918, at the age of 32. He had never married and was buried in plot II, row B, grave 24, of the Unicorn Cemetery, Vend'huile, Aisne, France.[3]

On 9 March 1920 Joseph's personal effects, his pipe, note book, letters and identity disc were returned to his widowed mother, she also received the two campaign medals, the Victory Medal and the British War Medal, that Joseph was awarded.[4]

 

 


[1] TNA: WO 363/B2263 First World War Army Service Documents for Hercules Booker.

[2] TNA: WO 372/2 First World War Medal Card for Hercules Booker.

[3] TNA: WO 363/B2263 First World War Army Service Documents for Joseph Booker.

[4] TNA: WO 372/2 First World War Medal Card for Joseph Booker.

 

Copyright © Derek Miller 2013-2016

Last updated 21 June 2016

 

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