HIGH HURSTWOOD

ITS HISTORY from the STONE AGE to the 21st CENTURY

 

ITS BUILDINGS AND LANDS, THE FAMILIES THAT OCCUPIED THEM,

AND THE ACTIVITIES THAT WENT ON THERE

 

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The BOOKER Family

 

Richard & Dorothy Booker’s Family

John & Harriet Booker’s Family

Henry & Sarah Ann Booker’s Family

Charles & Ann Booker’s Family

 

 

Richard & Dorothy Booker’s Family

 

Chart of Richard & Dorothy Booker's Family

 

Richard Booker was the son of John and Elizabeth Booker; he had been born at Buxted in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 2 February 1786. When he was 25 years old Richard married 20-year-old Dorothy Muddle at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted, Sussex on 4 October 1811. Dorothy was the daughter of John and Mary Muddle; she had been born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 26 April 1791. Richard and Dorothy had ten children, born at High Hurstwood between 1811 and 1833, the first three of whom died in infancy.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 19 June 1812 it was recorded that Richard had purchased from his parents John and Elizabeth Booker for £40, one cottage and one rood of land at High Hurstwood that had a yearly manorial rent of 1d.[1] This is the copyhold property that had been sold to John Booker in 1769 by John Muddle, the brother of Dorothy's grandfather Isaac Muddle, it was called Ivy Hole and is now called Woodpeckers. Richard was a cordwainer (shoemaker), as his father was, and with the purchase of this property he probably took-over his father's business. At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 20 February 1832 Richard and Dorothy took out a mortgage on this property for £50 at 5% interest from Richard Porter of the Cliff near Lewes, Sussex.[2]

Then at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 20 June 1832, on payment of £1 to the Lord of the Manor, Richard was granted from the Waste of the Manor, 22 perches of new assert land as copyhold that abutted his own land on the north, and the yearly manorial rent was set at 1d.[3] The land that it abutted on the north was no actually owned by Richard but by John Muddle the father of Richard's wife, but it's thought that Richard and his wife had been using it for some time and was therefore generally considered to be Richard's property.

On the Buxted Parish tithe map of 1840 Richard was shown as owning plot 153 which consisted of a cottage and 1 rood 10 perches of land with a tithe rent of zero, this was the above copyhold property of 22 perches that had more than doubled in size since 1832. Richard was also shown as owning plot 152 consisting of a cottage and 26 perches of land with a tithe rent of zero, this is the copyhold property called Ivy Hole that he had purchased from his parents. Also on 1840 tithe map Richard was shown as being the occupier of Mires, the old name for Maypole Farm in High Hurstwood, which was owned by Thomas Alchorne, who was then living at nearby Carrots Farm. In the census of 6 June 1841 Richard and Dorothy were living at the Maypole Farm with five of their children, and Richard was now a farmer.

 

 

On the death of her father in 1843 Dorothy inherited £40, which had to be paid to her within 12 months by the inheritor of Browns Nest, who was her brother Joseph Muddle. Death duty tax of 8s 2d was paid on this inheritance on 29 March 1845.[4] Dorothy also inherited from her father a plot of land of 12 perches on which she had built a house that is now called The Cottage. This land was 12 perches in size when originally granted to John Muddle, but by 1840 as plot 1298 on the Tithe Map had grown to 39 perches, and was the land on the north of the 22 perches granted to Richard Booker. It was part of her father's copyhold tenement consisting of land of 12 perches and a hop garden of 12 perches paying a yearly manorial rent of 1d, and forming part of Browns Nest. At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 17 June 1846 Dorothy was admitted on payment of 6d to the Lord of the Manor, to this land of 12 perches. At the same manorial court, a yearly manorial rent of 0.5d was apportioned to Dorothy's part of the tenement, and 0.5d to the remainder.[5] Then at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 16 June 1847, Dorothy and her brother Joseph were made guardians of their nephews John and Charles Muddle, who were minors and had just been admitted as heirs to the hop garden of 12 perches.[6]

 

 

In the census of 30 March 1851 Richard and Dorothy were living at Newlands Farm (now called the Royal Oak) in High Hurstwood, and living with them were; their son Charles who worked on the farm; their recently married daughter, Ann, and her husband Isaac Veness; and 23-year-old farm labourer Edmund Isted as a lodger. They were now tenants of Benjamin Minns the younger who had owned Newlands since 1844. In this census Richard was described as a farmer of 15 acres and employing one labourer.

The location of Newlands Farm was always used as one of the points in describing the boundary of one of Buxted's census districts; in 1851 it was referred to as Reed's Shop and then in later censuses as the Hurstwood Grocer's Shop. So it seems that a man called Reed was operating a shop at Newlands Farm where the Booker family were living and was probably employing Richard Booker's son Henry as shopman because Henry was described as a grocer's shopman in the 1851 census when he was living with his wife and her family at Old Hall Cottages. Then in the 1855 Post Office Directory of the Six Home Counties Henry Booker was a beer retailer and shopman at High Hurstwood, so Henry had presumably taken over the grocer's shop from Mr Reed and had also started selling beer there.

At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 21 June 1854 it was recorded that on 24 October 1853 Richard Porter acknowledged repayment of £50 and interest on the mortgage taken out on 20 February 1832 by Richard and Dorothy on their property called Ivy Hole.[7]

In the census of 7 April 1861 Richard and Dorothy still lived at Newlands, which Richard farmed, and their married son Charles and his wife and three children lodged there with them. Their son Henry was recorded as being a visitor there, and to be an out of business grocer, which suggests that this initial attempt to have a grocer's shop and sell beer at Newlands was fairly short lived. They also had 83-year-old widower John Histed as a lodger.

In the 1862 enclosures of the remaining wastes of Framfield Manor Richard purchased three plots of land from the lord of the manor. These were adjoining his existing properties (plots 152 & 153 on the tithe map), and Dorothy’s property (plot 1298 on the tithe map). They were; plot 64 of 20 perches; plot 65 of 1 rood; and plot 67 of 8 perches; for which he paid £2 10s 0d for the freehold. See the maps on the chart of ‘The History of the Muddle & Booker families’ copyhold land in High Hurstwood’ for more details including the other properties owned by the Booker family.

Richard died on 1 May 1863, at the age of 77, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 6 May 1863. Richard had made his will on 22 February 1856 and probate of this will was granted to his son Richard John Booker, one of the executors, by Lewes Probate Registry on 28 November 1865, when Richard's personal estate was valued at under £20. The other executor was Richard's son William Booker. In this will Richard left his son Richard John Booker the land on which he had built his house, this is the land of 22 perches granted to Richard in 1832 (plot 153 on the 1840 Tithe Map that had grown to 1 rood 10 perches and is now the land of the properties called Trinity Cottage and White Briars), The house that Richard John Booker had built no longer exists but stood just behind where White Briars now stands. All the remainder of Richard's real and personal estate was to be for the use of his wife Dorothy during her life and then to be shared equally by those of his children still living at the time of Dorothy's death. But it seems that not all of Richard's children who would still be living at the time of Dorothy's death inherited their share of Richard's property, as it seems to have been shared out between his two sons who were the executors with no regard for the terms of their father's will. Two years before Dorothy's death son William claimed as his right and inheritance his father's property of Ivy Hole at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 22 June 1866.[8] Then the following year son Richard John purchased from his mother for £60 the land of 12 perches that she had inherited from her father on which she had built a house, now called The Cottage, this sale being recorded at the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 12 February 1867.[9] Then the following year Dorothy died at the age of 77, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 7 May 1868.

 

Their children were:

Louisa 1811-1813  Lucy 1813-1816  Sarah 1816-1816  William 1818-1881

Richard John 1820-1885  Charity 1822-1854  Henry 1825-1906

Hope 1827-1838  Charles 1830-1904  Ann Faith 1833-?

 

 

Richard and Dorothy’s eldest child was Louisa Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 1 December 1811. Louisa died when only 2 years old, and she was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 14 October 1813.

 

Richard and Dorothy’s second child was Lucy Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 25 December 1813. Lucy died when only 2 years old, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 11 August 1816.

 

Richard and Dorothy’s third child was Sarah Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 11 February 1816. Louisa died when only 7 months old, and she was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 18 August 1816.

 

Richard and Dorothy’s fourth child was William Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 18 January 1818. In the census of 6 June 1841 William, at the age of 23, was living with his parents at the Maypole Farm in High Hurstwood.

When he was 27 years old William married 27-year-old Mary Cook, who was from Hadlow Down in Sussex, at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 12 November 1845. William's brother Henry was also married there on the same day. Mary was the daughter of Michael and Hannah Cook; she had been born in Mayfield Parish, Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Dunstan in Mayfield on 23 August 1818. (Mary was recorded as Mary Ann at her marriage but on all other records including her baptism she is just Mary.) William and Mary are thought to have been childless as there are no baptism records at Buxted or census records of children.

In the census of 30 March 1851 William and Mary were living at Crowborough, Sussex, and William was working as a farm labourer. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 they were living at Morffeys (Morphews) near Sleeches Farm in High Hurstwood; this cottage was later extended and called The Homestead, and it is now back to being called Morphews; it is in Fowley Lane at High Hurstwood. William was now described as being a farmer of 20 acres. It is thought that it was at about this time that William opened a beer shop at Morphews for the workmen building the nearby railway line running north from Uckfield. One of the major constructions on this line was the viaduct over the river at Tibbs Mill, which was only 800 yards away.

William went to the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 22 June 1866, and as a result of his father's death in 1863 he claimed as his right and inheritance, as the eldest son, his late father's copyhold property of a cottage and one rood of land at High Hurstwood, which he was admitted to on payment of 1d.[10] This is the property then called Ivy Hole and now called Woodpeckers, and was plot 152 on the Buxted Parish tithe map of 1840. William would also have had the freehold land of 8 perches, plot 67 of the 1862 enclosures, which adjoined Ivy Hole.

In the census of 2 April 1871 William and Mary were living at the Grocer’s Shop in High Hurstwood with two boarders, one of whom was Mary’s mother, and a lodger. William was now described as a master grocer employing one boy. The Grocer’s Shop would have been at Newlands Farm (now the Royal Oak), the tenancy of which William probably took-over when his father died in 1863. This house and farm were still owned by Benjamin Minns, there is no indication that William farmed the land, but he probably did. In the census of 3 April 1881 William and Mary are still living at the Grocer’s Shop, which was now additionally described as a Beer Shop, with two lodgers, and William was described as being a grocer and publican. This seems to indicate that it was William who started the Royal Oak Pub at High Hurstwood sometime in the 1870s, though his brother Henry may have sold beer there for a time in the mid-1850s for their father.

 

 

Later in 1881 William died at the age of 63, and he was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 28 September 1881. In his will dated the 12 April 1878 and proved at the District Registry in Lewes on 24 October 1881, William left all his property to his wife Mary. At the Court of the Manor of Framfield held on 21 November 1882 Mary was admitted on payment of 6d, to her late husband's copyhold property of Ivy Hole. At the same court she then sold this property to Amos Smith, a carpenter of High Hurstwood for £95; this sale would have also included the adjoining freehold land of 8 perches.[11] Mary continued to live at Newlands Farm until it was sold by the heirs of Benjamin Minns on the 14 October 1884. An inventory of tenant's rights written by Mary on 26 September 1884 for the new owner, William Duvall, states that the new incoming tenant was to be Henry Hoath.[12]

In the census of 5 April 1891 Mary was living in a cottage in the vicinity of Newlands Farm, and she had 11-year-old Solomon Smith as a lodger. Mary was still living at High Hurstwood when she died at the age of 72, and was buried in the Churchyard of Holy Trinity at High Hurstwood on 7 March 1892.

 

Richard and Dorothy’s fifth child was Richard John Booker, known as John, who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 9 July 1820. In the census of 6 June 1841 John, at the age of 21, was living with his parents at the Maypole Farm in High Hurstwood. When he was 21 years old John married Harriet Turk, who was about 24, at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 19 October 1841. Harriet was the daughter of Thomas and Sarah Turk, and she had been born at Buxted in about 1817. See the page headed ‘John & Harriet Booker’s Family’ for the rest of their lives and details of their family.

 

Richard and Dorothy’s sixth child was Charity Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 22 September 1822. In the census of 6 June 1841 Charity, at the age of 19, was living with her parents at the Maypole Farm in High Hurstwood.

When she was 18 years old Charity married 24-year-old William Jarvis, who was a carpenter, at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 26 July 1841. William was the son of William and Martha Jarvis; he had been born at Waldron in Sussex on 13 April 1817, and baptised by the Eastbourne Wesleyan Methodist Circuit on 27 May 1817.[13] William and Charity had five children; the first was born at High Hurstwood in late 1841; the second and third were born at Waldron in 1843 and 1845; and the fourth and fifth at Southborough near Tunbridge Wells in Kent in 1847 and 1850. Their fourth child died in 1848 when only a few months old. In the census of 30 March 1851 they were living at Modest Corner in Southborough with three of their surviving children, and William was continuing to work as a carpenter. Their youngest daughter was then staying with William's parents in Waldron. Charity died at the age of 32, her death being registered in Tonbridge registration district in Kent during 4th quarter of 1854.

About a year after Charity’s death William, at the age of 38, married 31-year-old Caroline Ashdown in Tonbridge registration district during the 4th quarter of 1855. Caroline was the daughter of Edmund and Esther Ashdown; she had been born at Tonbridge and baptised on 26 December 1824. William and Caroline had five children born at Southborough between 1858 and 1865. In the census of 7 April 1861 they were living at 12 Castle Street in Southborough with their then two children and one of William's daughters from his first marriage, and William was a journeyman carpenter. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 they were living in Castle Street with their five children, and William was continuing to work as a carpenter. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at 27 Castle Street with three of their children and their 1-year-old granddaughter, Ellen Jarvis. William was still a carpenter. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at 27 Castle Street with just their 11-year-old granddaughter, Ellen Jarvis, and William was continuing to work as a carpenter. In the census of 31 March 1901 just William and Caroline were living at 27 Castle Street, and William was working as a carpenter on his own account.

William died at the age of 87, his death being registered in Tonbridge registration district during the 2nd quarter of 1904. In the census of 2 April 1911 Caroline and her granddaughter Martha Brown were living at 27 Castle Street in Southborough. Ten years after William's death Caroline died at the age of 90, her death being registered in Tonbridge registration district during the 3rd quarter of 1914.

 

 

William and Charity’s eldest child was Mary Jane Jarvis, known as Jane, who was born at High Hurstwood in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Mark in Hadlow Down, Sussex on 5 December 1841. In the census of 30 March 1851 Jane, at the age of 9, was living with her parents at Modest Corner in Southborough near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Jane, now aged 19, was a live-in nursemaid to the family of Major William Augustus Munn at Throwley House in Throwley near Faversham in Kent. In the census of 2 April 1871 Jane, at the age of 29, was a live-in housemaid to the family of retired Captain John Moore at Rose Mount in Loose, Kent. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Jane, at the age of 49, had the occupation of nurse and was a boarder at the Home for Inebriate Women at Collison House, Woodside Park, Finchley, London. In the census of 31 March 1901 Jane, still unmarried at the age of 59, was a nurse staying with the family of her sister Alice Wheatley at 42 Dudley Street in Bedford, Bedfordshire.

 

William and Charity’s second child was John Jarvis who was born at Waldron in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of All Saints in Waldron on 28 May 1843. In the census of 30 March 1851 John, at the age of 8, was living with his parents at Modest Corner in Southborough near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, and he was going to school.

 

William and Charity’s third child was Alice Ann Jarvis who was born at Waldron in Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of All Saints in Waldron on 14 December 1845. In the census of 30 March 1851 Alice, at the age of 5, was living with her paternal grandparents, William and Martha Jarvis, at Flints in Waldron, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 7 April 1861 Alice, now aged 15, was working as a nursemaid and living with her father and stepmother at 12 Castle Street in Southborough near Tunbridge Wells in Kent. In the census of 2 April 1871 Alice, at the age of 25, was a live-in parlour maid to the family of Thomas Carr, the Rector of Barming, at The Rectory in East Barming near Maidstone in Kent.

 

William and Charity’s fourth child was Thomas Jarvis who was born at Southborough near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted, Sussex on 17 October 1847. Thomas died when he was only a few months old, his death being registered in Tonbridge registration district in Kent during the 2nd quarter of 1848.

 

William and Charity’s fifth child was William Jarvis who was born at Southborough near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1850. In the census of 30 March 1851 William, at the age of 6 months, was living with his parents at Modest Corner in Southborough near Tunbridge Wells in Kent.

 

William and Caroline’s eldest child (William’s sixth) was Martha Ellen Jarvis who was born at Southborough near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1858. In the census of 7 April 1861 Martha, at the age of 3, was living with her parents at 12 Castle Street in Southborough. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Martha, now aged 13, was living with her parents in Castle Street, and she was going to school. In the census of 3 April 1881 Martha, at the age of 23, was working as a housemaid and living with her parents at 27 Castle Street.

 

William and Caroline’s second child (William’s seventh) was Caroline Jarvis who was born at Southborough near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1859. In the census of 7 April 1861 Caroline, at the age of 2, was living with her parents at 12 Castle Street in Southborough. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Caroline, now aged 12, was living with her parents in Castle Street, and she was going to school.

 

William and Caroline’s third child (William’s eighth) was Fanny Emily Jarvis who was born at Southborough near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1861. In the census of 2 April 1871 Fanny, at the age of 10, was living with her parents in Castle Street, and she was going to school.

 

William and Caroline’s fourth child (William’s ninth) was Alfred Jarvis who was born at Southborough near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1863. In the census of 2 April 1871 Alfred, at the age of 7, was living with his parents in Castle Street, and he was going to school. This census recorded that Alfred had had a deformed foot from birth. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Alfred, now aged 17, was living with his parents at 27 Castle Street.

 

William and Caroline’s fifth child (William’s tenth) was Harry Jarvis who was born at Southborough near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, and whose birth was registered during the 3rd quarter of 1865. In the census of 2 April 1871 Harry, at the age of 5, was living with his parents in Castle Street, and he was going to school. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Harry, now aged 15, was living with his parents at 27 Castle Street.

 

 

Richard and Dorothy’s seventh child was Henry Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 10 April 1825. In the census of 6 June 1841 Henry, at the age of 16, was a live-in grocer's apprentice to grocer Samuel Reed at Cliffton Villa in Maresfield, Sussex. When he was 20 years old Henry married his first cousin, 27-year-old Sarah Ann Smith, at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 12 November 1845. Henry's brother William was also married there on the same day. Sarah Ann was the daughter of James and Anne Smith; she had been born at High Hurstwood and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 13 September 1818. Her mother was a sister of Henry's mother. See the page headed ‘Henry & Sarah Ann Booker’s Family’ for the rest of their lives and details of their family.

 

Richard and Dorothy’s eighth child was Hope Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 9 September 1827. Hope died when 10 years old, and was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 15 February 1838.

 

Richard and Dorothy’s ninth child was Charles Booker who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 25 July 1830. In the census of 6 June 1841 Charles, at the age of 10, was living with his parents at the Maypole Farm in High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 30 March 1851 Charles, now aged 20, was living with his parents at Newlands Farm in High Hurstwood, and he was working for his father on the farm.

When he was 23 years old Charles married 19-year-old Ann Vinall at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 9 December 1853. Ann was the daughter of John and Elizabeth Vinall; she had been privately baptised on 2 April 1834 and then received into the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 1 June 1834. See the page headed ‘Charles & Ann Booker’s Family’ for the rest of their lives and details of their family.

 

Richard and Dorothy’s tenth child was Ann Faith Booker, known as Faith Ann, who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 17 November 1833. In the census of 6 June 1841 Faith, at the age of 7, was living with her parents at the Maypole Farm in High Hurstwood.

When she was 17 years old Faith married 22-year-old Isaac Veness at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 4 November 1850. Faith's cousin John Muddle, the eldest son of Joseph Muddle, who was a brother of Faith's mother, was also married there on the same day. Isaac was the son of Joseph and Mary Veness; he had been born at Ashburnham in Sussex and baptised at the Parish Church of St Peter in Ashburnham on 26 October 1828. In the census of 30 March 1851 Isaac and Faith were living with Faith's parents at Newlands Farm in High Hurstwood, and Isaac was a higler (trader in poultry etc.).

Isaac and Faith had twelve children born between 1851 and 1872. Their first seven children were born at High Hurstwood between 1851 and 1861, the sixth dying in 1860 when only 4 months old. In the census of 7 April 1861 they were living somewhere near Old Hall Farm in High Hurstwood with their then five surviving children, and Isaac was now a farmer of 90 acres. They then moved to Framfield in Sussex where their seventh child died in early 1863, at the age of 18 months, and their eighth child was born there in late 1863, but by the time this child was baptised in April 1864 they were living at Fletching Common in Fletching Parish, Sussex and Isaac had become a threshing machine owner. Their ninth and tenth children were born in 1865 and 1867 while they were living at Fletching Common. Then when their eleventh child was born in 1869 they were living at Chelwood Common in Danehill (part of the ancient parish of Fletching). In the census of 2 April 1871 they were living at Chelwood Common with five of their children, and Isaac was described as a master steam sawyer. They were still living at Chelwood Common when the twelfth child was born in early 1872, but had moved to Newick in Sussex by the time this child was baptised in July 1872. At the baptism of this child and the others since 1864 Isaac had been described as a threshing machine owner, probably combining this with being a steam sawyer, using the same steam engine to power both machines.

Then in the census of 3 April 1881 they were living at 1 Cromwell Cottage in Cricketers Road in the St Johns area of Clayton Parish, Sussex, which became Burgess Hill, with three of their children, and Isaac was working as a carpenter. Also living with them was their grandson Robert Sidney Veness, who was the illegitimate son of their daughter Elizabeth. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living in Leylands Road at Burgess Hill and Isaac was now working as a general labourer. They had their grandson Robert Sidney Veness continuing to live with them, and also a granddaughter, Mary Maud Brown, the daughter of their daughter Mary. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 they were living at the Old School House in Junction Road, Burgess Hill, and Isaac was now a poultry farmer working on his own account at home. Their grandson Robert Sidney Veness was still living with them and their daughter Kate was back living with them. From 1901 to 1910 Isaac was recorded as being the householder at the Old School House, and to be a carpenter. In the census of 2 April 1911 Isaac and Faith were living at the Old School House with their daughter Kate and Isaac was a carpenter in the building industry. In this census it was recorded that they'd had 12 children of which 8 were still alive, so there must have been four more than the 12 known, who probably died at birth or soon after. Their grandson Robert Sidney Veness had married in 1908 and in this census Robert and his wife were lodging in two rooms of the Old School House.

Isaac died at Burgess Hill on 9 January 1914, at the age of 85, and he was buried in the Churchyard of St Andrew at Burgess Hill. Faith continued to live at the Old School House until 1917, but was living with the family of her daughter Martha Ann at Rosevale, 309 Junction Road, Burgess Hill when she died on 20 August 1927, at the age of 93. She was buried in the Churchyard of St Andrew at Burgess Hill.

 

 

 

Isaac and Faith’s first child was Anne Maria Veness who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 26 October 1851. In the census of 7 April 1861 Anne, at the age of 9, was living with her parents in High Hurstwood, and she going to school. But two years later Anne died at Chailey in Sussex, at the age of 12, and she was buried in the Churchyard of St Peter at Chailey on 16 December 1863.

 

Isaac and Faith’s second child was Isaac Veness who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 24 January 1853. In the census of 7 April 1861 Isaac, at the age of 8, was living with his parents in High Hurstwood, and he going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Isaac, now aged 18, was a farm servant living with his grandparents, Joseph and Mary Veness, at Wapsbourne in Chailey, Sussex where they were farming 255 acres. In the census of 3 April 1881 Isaac, at the age of 28, was a live-in servant to banker's agent Edgar Corrie at Fair Lawn, Fair Mile, Cobham, Surrey.

When he was 33 years old Isaac married 32-year-old Sarah Orchard in Kingston registration district in Surrey during the 2nd quarter of 1886. Sarah was the daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Orchard; she had been born at Bratton in Wiltshire and her birth registered during 1st quarter of 1854. Isaac and Sarah are not thought to have had any children. In the census of 5 April 1891 they were living in the Coachman's House at Hampton Court House in Hampton, Middlesex and Isaac was working as a domestic coachman. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 they were living with publisher's representative John Hellewell and his wife at 87 Pembroke Crescent in Hove, Sussex. They were both working for John Hellewell; Isaac as a domestic coachman and Sarah as a cook and general domestic servant.

Sarah died at the age of 50, her death being registered in Brighton registration district in Sussex during the 1st quarter of 1904. In the census of 2 April 1911 Isaac was working as a coachman and lodging with the family of milkman Frederick Hobbs at 19 Castle Street in Brighton. Twenty years after Sarah's death Isaac died at the age of 71, his death being registered in Steyning registration district in Sussex during the 3rd quarter of 1924.

 

Isaac and Faith’s third child was Joseph Veness who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 1 October 1854. In the census of 7 April 1861 Joseph, at the age of 6, was living with his parents in High Hurstwood, and he going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Joseph, now aged 16, was a live-in farm servant to farmer John Fielder at Avons Farm in Chailey, Sussex.

When he was 26 years old Joseph married 31-year-old Mary Overington in Brighton registration district in Sussex during the 1st quarter of 1881. Mary had been born at Wisborough Green in Sussex and she was baptised at the Parish Church of St Peter ad Vincula in Wisborough Green on 24 March 1850, as Mary Overington Wilmer the illegitimate daughter of Elizabeth Wilmer.

Joseph and Mary had three children, all daughters, born at Brighton, the first at about the time they married. In the census of 3 April 1881 they were lodging with fruiterer Ernest Gould and his wife at 11 Guildford Road in Brighton; they had their young daughter living with them and Joseph was working as a gardener. Their second daughter was born in late 1882 and in the census of 5 April 1891 they were living at 2 Exeter Street in Preston near Brighton with their two daughters and Joseph was a domestic gardener. Their third daughter was born in early 1892. In the census of 31 March 1901 they boarding with the family of labourer Arthur Trangmar at 11 Station Road in Preston with their two youngest daughters and Joseph was now working on his own account as a market gardener.

Mary died at the age of 55, her death being registered in Steyning registration district in Sussex during the 4th quarter of 1905. In the census of 2 April 1911 Joseph and his two youngest daughters were living at 14 Station Road in Preston and he was continuing to work on his own account as a market gardener. He also had his widowed sister-in-law Mary Overington and her son living with him. Joseph died at the age of 68, his death being registered in Lewes registration district in Sussex during the 3rd quarter of 1922.

 

 

Joseph and Mary’s eldest child was Edith Veness who was born at Brighton in Sussex in about March 1881. In the census of 3 April 1881 Edith, at the age of one month was living with her parents, who were lodging with fruiterer Ernest Gould and his wife at 11 Guildford Road in Brighton. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Edith, now aged 10, was living with her parents at 2 Exeter Street in Preston near Brighton.

 

Joseph and Mary’s second child was Kate Veness who was born at Brighton in Sussex and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1882. In the census of 5 April 1891 Kate, at the age of 8, was living with her parents at 2 Exeter Street in Preston near Brighton. Then in the census of 31 March 1901 Kate, now aged 18, was working as a school teacher and living with her parents, who were boarding with the family of labourer Arthur Trangmar at 11 Station Road in Preston. In the census of 2 April 1911 Kate, at the age of 28, was continuing to work as a school teacher and she was living with her widowed father at 14 Station Road in Preston.

 

Joseph and Mary’s third child was Daisy Veness who was born at Brighton in Sussex and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1892. In the census of 31 March 1901 Daisy, at the age of 9, was going to school and living with her parents, who were boarding with the family of labourer Arthur Trangmar at 11 Station Road in Preston. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Daisy, at the age of 19, was working as a shop assistant and living with her widowed father at 14 Station Road in Preston.

 

 

Isaac and Faith’s fourth child was Elizabeth Veness who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 14 June 1857. In the census of 7 April 1861 Elizabeth, at the age of 3, was living with her parents in High Hurstwood, and she going to school. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Elizabeth, now aged 13, was living with her uncle and aunt, Daniel and Sarah Watson, at Lane End in Newick, Sussex and working as a general servant. Then when she was about 22 years old Elizabeth gave birth to an illegitimate son at Brighton on 18 May 1879, who lived with and was raised by Elizabeth's parents. In the census of 3 April 1881 Elizabeth, at the age of 23, was a live-in general servant to the family of magistrate Edward Swan at Cants Villas in Burgess Hill, Sussex.

When she was 29 years old Elizabeth married 70-year-old widower Caleb Tidy at the Parish Church of St John in Burgess Hill on 26 December 1886. Caleb was the son of David and Sarah Tidy; he had been born at Ewhurst in Surrey and baptised at the Parish Church of St Peter & St Paul at Ewhurst on 21 April 1816. He had married Jane Stone at Cuckfield in 1845 and then Helen Burdfield in London in 1861. It was only seven months after he had married Elizabeth that Caleb died at the age of 71, and he was buried in the Churchyard of St Peter & St Paul at Lingfield in Surrey on 4 August 1887.

 

 

Elizabeth’s illegitimate son was Robert Sidney Veness who was born at Brighton in Sussex on 18 May 1879. In the census of 3 April 1881 Robert, at the age of 1, was living with his maternal grandparents, Isaac and Faith Veness, at 1 Cromwell Cottage, Cricketers Road, St Johns Common, Clayton. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Robert, now aged 11, was living with his maternal grandparents at Leylands Road in Burgess Hill, and he was going to school. In the census of 31 March 1901 Robert, at the age of 21, was working as a general labourer and living with his maternal grandparents at the Old School House in Burgess Hill.

When he was 29 years old Robert married 25-year-old Maude Florence Foster in Cuckfield registration district in Sussex during the 4th quarter of 1908. Maude was the daughter of Steven and Emma Foster; she had been born at Sutton in Surrey and her birth registered during the 1st quarter of 1883. In the census of 2 April 1911 Robert and Maude were lodging in two rooms at the Old School House in Burgess Hill, which was otherwise still occupied by Robert's grandparents.

 

 

Isaac and Faith’s fifth child was Mary Veness who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex on 16 September 1858, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 31 October 1858. In the census of 7 April 1861 Mary, at the age of 2, was living with her parents in High Hurstwood. Then in the census of 2 April 1871 Mary, now aged 12, was living with her parents at Chelwood Common in Danehill, Sussex, and she was going to school.

When she was just on 23 years old Mary married 37-year-old John Wellstead Brown in St Saviour registration district in London during the 3rd quarter of 1881. John had been born at Portsea in Hampshire and his birth registered during the 4th quarter of 1843. They had one child born at 138 Leadenhall Road in the City of London during 1885. Four years later Mary died at the age of 30 (not 29 as given on her death certificate), her death being registered in Pancras registration district in London during the 2nd quarter of 1889. In the census of 5 April 1891 John was living with Arthur and Ada Brown at 200 Goswell Road, Finsbury, London. John died at the age of 48, his death being registered in Poplar registration district in London during the 3rd quarter of 1892.

 

 

John and Mary’s only child was Mary Maud V Brown who was born at 138 Leadenhall Road in the City of London on 27 October 1885. Mary's mother died in 1889 and in the census of 5 April 1891 Mary, at the age of 5, was staying with her maternal grandparents, Isaac and Faith Veness, at Leylands Road in Burgess Hill, Sussex. Mary's father died in 1892, leaving her an orphan.

 

 

Isaac and Faith’s sixth child was John Veness who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 15 April 1860. John died when only four months old, and he was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 9 May 1860.

 

Isaac and Faith’s seventh child was Margaret Veness who was born at High Hurstwood in Buxted Parish, Sussex, and her birth registered during the 4th quarter of 1861. She was baptised at the Parish Church of St Margaret the Queen in Buxted on 5 October 1862. Margaret died at Framfield in Sussex when she was 18 months old, and she was buried in the Churchyard of St Margaret the Queen at Buxted on 3 March 1863.

 

Isaac and Faith’s eighth child was Alexander John Bailey Veness who was born at Framfield in Sussex, and whose birth was registered during the 4th quarter of 1863. Alexander was baptised at the Parish Church of St Andrew and St Mary the Virgin in Fletching, Sussex on 22 April 1864. In the census of 2 April 1871 Alexander, at the age of 7, was living with his parents at Chelwood Common in Danehill, Sussex, and he was going to school.

 

 

Isaac and Faith’s ninth child was Sarah Jane Veness who was born at Fletching in Sussex on 16 March 1865, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Andrew and St Mary the Virgin in Fletching on 4 March 1866. In the census of 2 April 1871 Sarah, at the age of 6, was living with her parents at Chelwood Common in Danehill, Sussex, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Sarah, now aged 16, was working as a domestic servant and living with her parents at 1 Cornwell Cottage in Cricketers Road in the St Johns area of Clayton Parish, Sussex. In the census of 5 April 1891 Sarah, at the age of 26, was working as a servant at the Great Northern Hotel in Euston Road, St Pancras, London.

When she was 27 years old Sarah married 32-year-old Charles Benjamin Symes in Islington registration district in London during the 2nd quarter of 1892. Charles was the son of Charles and Sarah Symes; he had been born at Chelsea in London and his birth registered during the second quarter of 1860. Charles and Sarah are not thought to have had any children. In the census of 31 March 1901 they were living in part of 42 Pembroke Street in Islington and Charles was working as a porter at the Post Office. About two years later Sarah was declared a lunatic and was admitted to the London County Lunatic Asylum at Ilford, Essex where she was a patient in the census of 2 April 1911. Sarah had been living at 41 Salisbury Road in Islington (presumably were she had been living before being admitted to the asylum) when she died in the London County Lunatic Asylum on 20 March 1918, at the age of 53, from tuberculosis.

 

Isaac and Faith’s tenth child was Thomas James Veness who was born at Fletching in Sussex on 27 February 1867, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Andrew and St Mary the Virgin in Fletching on 2 June 1867. In the census of 2 April 1871 Thomas, at the age of 4, was living with his parents at Chelwood Common in Danehill, Sussex. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Thomas, now aged 14, was working as a brickmaker and living with his parents at 1 Cornwell Cottage in Cricketers Road in the St Johns area of Clayton Parish, Sussex.

On 19 November 1884, when he was 17 years old and working as a gardener, Thomas enlisted in the Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class. He was then described as 5ft 2¾ins tall with a fresh complexion, brown hair and grey eyes. He was made a Boy 1st Class on 4 November 1885 and then an Ordinary Seaman on 1 July 1887 when he signed on for ten years. He served on a number of different warships but after becoming an Ordinary Seaman his character deteriorated from being very good to fair and then indifferent. Then in early 1889 he ran (went absent without leave) for which he was given 90 days in gaol. He ran again on 17 December 1889 and there his Royal Navy career ends.[14] After this Thomas became a merchant seaman and sailed frequently to and from New York.

When he was 34 years old Thomas married 28-year-old Annie Naomi Brigden at Burgess Hill in Sussex during the 2nd quarter of 1901. Annie was the daughter of James and Frances Brigden; she had been born at Burgess Hill and her birth registered during the 4th quarter of 1872. Thomas and Annie had four children born at Greys in Essex between 1902 and 1910, the last of whom died soon after birth. In the census of 2 April 1911 they were living at 47 Rosedale Road in Greys, Essex with their three surviving children; Thomas was a mariner and Annie's widowed mother was visiting them.

During the First World War Thomas was still a merchant seaman and for his service during the war he was awarded the Mercantile Marine Medal and the British War Medal. They were living at 11 Rectory Road in Greys when these medals were issued in 1921.[15]

Annie died at the age of 68, her death being registered in Thurrock registration district in Essex during the 4th quarter of 1941. Seven years later Thomas died at the age of 81, his death being registered in Thurrock registration district during the 2nd quarter of 1948.

 

 

Thomas and Annie’s eldest child was Thomas James Veness who was born at Greys in Essex and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1902. In the census of 2 April 1911 Thomas, at the age of 9, was living with his parents at 47 Rosedale Road in Greys.

 

Thomas and Annie’s second child was Stanley Gordon Veness who was born at Greys in Essex and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1904. In the census of 2 April 1911 Stanley, at the age of 7, was living with his parents at 47 Rosedale Road in Greys.

 

Thomas and Annie’s third child was Lilian Annie F Veness who was born at Greys in Essex and whose birth was registered during the 2nd quarter of 1906. In the census of 2 April 1911 Lilian, at the age of 5, was living with her parents at 47 Rosedale Road in Greys.

 

Thomas and Annie’s fourth child was Albert George Veness who was born at Greys in Essex and whose birth was registered during the 1st quarter of 1910. Albert died at Greys soon after birth, his death being registered during the 1st quarter of 1910.

 

 

Isaac and Faith’s eleventh child was Martha Ann Veness who was born at Chelwood Common in Danehill within Fletching Parish in Sussex on 7 November 1868, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Andrew and St Mary the Virgin in Fletching on 1 August 1869. In the census of 2 April 1871 Martha, at the age of 2, was living with her parents at Chelwood Common in Danehill. Then in the census of 3 April 1881 Martha, now aged 12, was a live-in domestic servant to widowed schoolmistress Caroline Hoffman in Newport Road at Clayton, Sussex. In the census of 31 March 1901 Martha, at the age of 32, was a live-in housemaid to bachelor and retired civil servant Albert Wigney and his spinster sister at 2 College Terrace in Brighton, Sussex.

When she was 35 years old Martha married 34-year-old Ernest Henry Wheeler at the Parish Church of St John in Burgess Hill, Sussex on 16 February 1904. Ernest was the son of William and Maria Wheeler, and he had been born at Warminster in Wiltshire on 11 March 1870. He joined the army in 1889 and did much of his service in India. He was in the Royal Garrison Artillery when he married. After their marriage Ernest and Martha lived at 52 Guthrie Street in Glasgow as Ernest was then stationed in Scotland, and their three children were born there in 1905, 1906 and 1908. Ernest left the army in 1910 and the family settled in Burgess Hill, Sussex where Ernest became a butcher. They lived at Rosevale, 309 Junction Road, Burgess Hill from at least 1924 to 1949. Martha died at Rosevale during January 1949, at the age of 80. Then six weeks later Ernest died at the home of his daughter Faith in Haywards Heath, Sussex on 9 March 1949, at the age of 79.

 

 

 

Ernest and Martha’s eldest child was Faith Elsie May Wheeler who was born at 52 Guthrie Street in Glasgow, Scotland on 13 July 1905. When she was 29 years old Faith married William Henry Jacques, known as Harry, at St Andrew's Church in Burgess Hill, Sussex during the 3rd quarter of 1934. Harry and his twin brother had been born at Springfield Villas in Wantage, Berkshire on 30 December 1903.

 

Ernest and Martha’s second child was William Henry Wheeler who was born at 52 Guthrie Street in Glasgow, Scotland on 30 November 1906.

 

Ernest and Martha’s third child was Kathleen Annie Wheeler who was born at 52 Guthrie Street in Glasgow, Scotland on 1 December 1908.

 

 

 

Isaac and Faith’s twelfth child was Kate Veness who was born at Chelwood Common in Danehill within Fletching Parish in Sussex on 12 April 1872, and baptised at the Parish Church of St Andrew and St Mary the Virgin in Fletching on 7 July 1872. In the census of 3 April 1881 Kate, at the age of 8, was living with her parents at 1 Cornwell Cottage in Cricketers Road in the St Johns area of Clayton Parish, and she was going to school. Then in the census of 5 April 1891 Kate, now aged 18, was a live-in housemaid to boarding house keeper Annie Whitman at Wynnstay on the Keymer Road at Burgess Hill in Sussex. In the census of 31 March 1901 Kate, at the age of 28, was living with her parents at the Old School House in Burgess Hill. Then in the census of 2 April 1911 Kate, at the age of 38, was continuing to live with her parents at the Old School House. Kate's father died in 1914 and her mother in 1927. Kate never married. She had been living with the family of her sister Martha Wheeler at Rosevale, 309 Junction Road, Burgess Hill when she died in the East Sussex Mental Hospital at Hellingly, Sussex on 23 April 1948, at the age of 76.


[1] ESRO: ADA 123 pages 80-81, Manor of Framfield Court Book 10.

[2] ESRO: ADA 125 pages 35-36, Manor of Framfield Court Book 12.

[3] ESRO: ADA 125 pages 61-62, Manor of Framfield Court Book 12.

[4] TNA: IR 26/1651 folio 922 Death Duty Register 1843 K-M register 4.

[5] ESRO: ADA 127 pages 36-37, Manor of Framfield Court Book 14.

[6] ESRO: ADA 127 page 98, Manor of Framfield Court Book 14.

[7] ESRO: ADA 128 pages 86-87, Manor of Framfield Court Book 15.

[8] ESRO: ADA 129 pages 485-486, Manor of Framfield Court Book 16.

[9] ESRO: ADA 130 pages 6-7, Manor of Framfield Court Book 17.

[10] ESRO: ADA 129 pages 485-486, Manor of Framfield Court Book 16.

[11] ESRO: ADA 132 pages 91-92, Manor of Framfield Court Book 19.

[12] WSRO: WISTON/791 Inventory & valuation of tenant's rights for Newlands Farm, 26 Sep 1884.

[13] TNA: RG 4/2620 Eastbourne Wesleyan Methodist Circuit Baptisms 1808-1825.

[14] TNA: ADM 188/173/129155 Royal Navy Service Record for Thomas James Veness.

[15] TNA: BT 351/1/144242 Medal Card for Thomas James Veness.

 

Copyright © Derek Miller 2013-2016

Last updated 10 August 2016

 

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